You Learn Something New Every Day

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JD
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by JD »

People might find this interesting; it's a tool that lets you pick chords and then tell you which ones tend to come next (in the pop ouvre, mostly) and shows you which songs match the progression you've put together.
https://www.hooktheory.com/trends

For example, songs that go from Em to C include "Poison" by Alice Cooper, "You Don't Know Me" by Ben Folds, and "Humoresque Op 101 No 7" by Antonin Dvorak.
I sort of feel like a sucker about aspiring to be intellectually rigorous when I could just go on twitter and say capitalism causes space herpes and no one will challenge me on it. - Hugh Akston
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JD
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

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Patti Smith was married to Fred "Sonic" Smith of the MC5. That is not why she was named Smith, though, as Smith was her maiden name as well.
I sort of feel like a sucker about aspiring to be intellectually rigorous when I could just go on twitter and say capitalism causes space herpes and no one will challenge me on it. - Hugh Akston
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dead_elvis
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by dead_elvis »

TIL: REM's Superman was a cover.

"Never forget: a war on undocumented immigrants by necessity is a war on all of our freedoms of association and movement."
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Warren
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Warren »

dead_elvis wrote: 03 Mar 2021, 17:48 TIL: REM's Superman was a cover.

TIL: REM covered The Clique's I Am Superman.
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JD
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

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There was a popular early plastic called galalith (or erinoid or casolith or lactoloid in some countries) which is actually made from, essentially, curdled milk. It's easy to make, nontoxic, nonflammable, and biodegradable. Despite those seeming advantages, it has some severe disadvantages, as apparently it's more expensive to make than petroleum-based plastics, can't be molded, and is generally a lot less durable than other plastics.
I sort of feel like a sucker about aspiring to be intellectually rigorous when I could just go on twitter and say capitalism causes space herpes and no one will challenge me on it. - Hugh Akston
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lshap
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by lshap »

JD wrote: 30 Mar 2021, 10:33 There was a popular early plastic called galalith (or erinoid or casolith or lactoloid in some countries) which is actually made from, essentially, curdled milk. It's easy to make, nontoxic, nonflammable, and biodegradable. Despite those seeming advantages, it has some severe disadvantages, as apparently it's more expensive to make than petroleum-based plastics, can't be molded, and is generally a lot less durable than other plastics.
Could be great for packaging certain foods, though?
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Jasper
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

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That is interesting. Filing away for later. Casein is something I've wanted to experiment with for a long time, but our prohibition of any allergens on our production equipment makes it pointless.

The non-moldability is definitely a liability for packaging. The fact it's made using formaldehyde may play into consumers' negative perceptions of it too. But there's definitely interest in biodegradable 'bio-plastics' for food packaging. Lot of interesting work being done with cellulosics. *cough cough*
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JD
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

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Across Europe, people have found numerous bronze dodecahedrons among Roman artifacts. The objects themselves are odd enough: bronze dodecahedrons, ranging from about the size of a golf ball to about the size of a baseball, hollow, with a small knob at each apex. Each face of the dodecahedron has a round hole in it, but the holes are all of different sizes. And nobody has any idea what the hell they were for. There's even one similar but not identical bronze icosahedron.

There is no mention of them in Roman writings. There are enough of them and they are found widely enough across Europe that it clearly wasn't just the work of one guy turning out curiosities. They seem to have some sort of military connection, based on the fact that they're usually found at military sites. But beyond that, everything is guesswork.

Some kind of weapon, like a mace head or a sling bullet? (But they seem too elaborate for that.)
Connectors for tent poles? (Why are all the holes different sizes, then?)
Size gauges for knitting? (Then why only at military sites?)
Some kind of distance gauge? (Then why only in Europe, and why aren't they more standardized?)
Candle-holders?
Gambling or fortune-telling devices?
Ritual items?

Image
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lunchstealer
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

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Well there are two schools of thought, really. The Deons believe the Dodecahedron is a gift from god. The Savants hold that it is a technological artifact that should be studied scientifically. Now, Meglos holds that it is far more useful than the Savants understand and wants to use it to spread spiny death to all who would oppose him, but who listens to cactuses?
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JD
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

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A Navajo American soldier was captured by the Japanese in WWII, and they thought he was Japanese-American (so don't feel bad about confusing different kinds of Asian people). When they learned he was Navajo, they tortured him to get him to reveal the secrets of Navajo Code, which he couldn't do because it wasn't just about knowing the language, you also had to know the very specific code words they used.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Kieyo ... ner_of_war
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JD
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

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There was an 1839 conflict, called the Honey War, between Iowa Territory and Missouri over their shared border and its exact location. It escalated into the state militias facing off along the border, although in the end, the only "casualties" were three trees containing beehives that got cut down, and a Missouri sheriff getting jailed in Iowa.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honey_War
I sort of feel like a sucker about aspiring to be intellectually rigorous when I could just go on twitter and say capitalism causes space herpes and no one will challenge me on it. - Hugh Akston
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JD
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

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STS-27R, the third flight of the space shuttle Atlantis and only the second shuttle flight after the Challenger disaster, was almost a disaster of the kind that destroyed Columbia in STS-107.
Atlantis' Thermal Protection System tiles sustained extensive damage during the flight. Ablative insulating material from the right-hand solid rocket booster nose cap had hit the orbiter about 85 seconds into the flight, as seen in footage of the ascent.
...
One report describes the crew as "infuriated" that Mission Control seemed unconcerned.[10][11] When Gibson saw the damage he thought to himself, "We are going to die";[2] he and others did not believe that the shuttle would survive reentry. Gibson advised the crew to relax because "No use dying all tensed-up", he said,[8][7] but if instruments indicated that the shuttle was disintegrating, Gibson planned to "tell mission control what I thought of their analysis" in the remaining seconds before his death.[1][7]

Mullane recalled that while filming the reentry through the upper deck's overhead windows, "I had visions of molten aluminum being smeared backwards, like rain on a windshield". Although the shuttle landed safely "The damage was much worse than any of us had expected", he wrote.[7] Upon landing, the magnitude of the damage to the shuttle astonished NASA; over 700 damaged tiles were noted, and one tile was missing altogether.
I sort of feel like a sucker about aspiring to be intellectually rigorous when I could just go on twitter and say capitalism causes space herpes and no one will challenge me on it. - Hugh Akston
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lunchstealer
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

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JD wrote: 22 Apr 2021, 12:22 STS-27R, the third flight of the space shuttle Atlantis and only the second shuttle flight after the Challenger disaster, was almost a disaster of the kind that destroyed Columbia in STS-107.
Atlantis' Thermal Protection System tiles sustained extensive damage during the flight. Ablative insulating material from the right-hand solid rocket booster nose cap had hit the orbiter about 85 seconds into the flight, as seen in footage of the ascent.
...
One report describes the crew as "infuriated" that Mission Control seemed unconcerned.[10][11] When Gibson saw the damage he thought to himself, "We are going to die";[2] he and others did not believe that the shuttle would survive reentry. Gibson advised the crew to relax because "No use dying all tensed-up", he said,[8][7] but if instruments indicated that the shuttle was disintegrating, Gibson planned to "tell mission control what I thought of their analysis" in the remaining seconds before his death.[1][7]

Mullane recalled that while filming the reentry through the upper deck's overhead windows, "I had visions of molten aluminum being smeared backwards, like rain on a windshield". Although the shuttle landed safely "The damage was much worse than any of us had expected", he wrote.[7] Upon landing, the magnitude of the damage to the shuttle astonished NASA; over 700 damaged tiles were noted, and one tile was missing altogether.
The Thermal Protection System is a big deal and reports on the TPS need to be given top priority. That's why you have to use the new cover sheet.
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Kolohe
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Kolohe »

I vaguely remember (maybe?) discussions of this when they were doing the Columbia post mortem
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Warren »

Kolohe wrote: 24 Apr 2021, 18:12 I vaguely remember (maybe?) discussions of this when they were doing the Columbia post mortem
Didn't you get the memo?
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thoreau
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by thoreau »

Inoculation against smallpox was introduced to New England by a slave who brought the technique with him from Africa.

https://www.historyofvaccines.org/conte ... ton-mather

We should be naming hospitals after him.
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JD
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

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JD wrote: 24 Dec 2019, 10:46 You know how sometimes people say something like, "Instead of having a huge destructive war that kills a ton of people, why don't the two sides just each nominate champions to fight it out?" Something very similar to that actually happened: The Battle of the 300 Champions
And I just learned of another example, featuring none other than Pyrrhus of Epiros, from whose name we get the word "Pyrrhic."
Pyrrhus had the bulk of the army of Epirus with him, probably 20,000–25,000 men, while Pantauchus commanded but a detachment of Demetrius' army consisting of around 11,000 men. The fighting was heavy, and according to the sources Pantauchus and Pyrrhus sought out one another. Pantauchus challenged Pyrrhus to individual combat, and Pyrrhus accepted. After hurling spears at each other they fought it out with swords. Pyrrhus was wounded, but in return wounded his opponent twice, in the thigh and in the neck. Pantauchus' bodyguards had to carry him away.
but then of course
Emboldened by their king's victory, the Epirotes resumed their attack and broke Pantauchus' army, and took 5,000 prisoners.
I sort of feel like a sucker about aspiring to be intellectually rigorous when I could just go on twitter and say capitalism causes space herpes and no one will challenge me on it. - Hugh Akston
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JD
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

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There is a chess variant called Hand and Brain chess, in which each side has two players, called (duh) Hand and Brain. Brain picks which piece to move, but cannot specify how to move it; Hand must move the piece that Brain has chosen, but has freedom in exactly what to do with it. Hilarity results if the teammates have different ideas about strategy.
I sort of feel like a sucker about aspiring to be intellectually rigorous when I could just go on twitter and say capitalism causes space herpes and no one will challenge me on it. - Hugh Akston
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Eric the .5b
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Eric the .5b »

The "OMG, Trump invented lying" lady is this journo:



The producers told her to paddle in the shallow water, but even after being a laughingstock for five hot minutes and later admitting that yeah, she was totally scraping the bottom with her oar, there, she vigorously defended the totally-not-deceptive nature of that bit.
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lshap
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

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JD wrote: 06 May 2021, 14:23 There is a chess variant called Hand and Brain chess, in which each side has two players, called (duh) Hand and Brain. Brain picks which piece to move, but cannot specify how to move it; Hand must move the piece that Brain has chosen, but has freedom in exactly what to do with it. Hilarity results if the teammates have different ideas about strategy.
I must try this!
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