What's New at the Bijou?

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Aresen
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Re: What's New at the Bijou?

Post by Aresen »

I enjoyed the Foundation series - the initial 3 books - mainly because I was a hard science geek. At the time, I thought the concept of a 'science' of history was fascinating. Little did I realize at the time that the story was basically the fall of the Byzantine Empire set in space.

Asimov's characters were a little lifeless - all too rational and lacking emotion.

It wasn't too noticeable in the Foundation series, but he could get preachy on social issues.
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Warren
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Re: What's New at the Bijou?

Post by Warren »

Aresen wrote: 16 Apr 2020, 10:55 Asimov's characters were a little lifeless - all too rational and lacking emotion.
That's actually what I liked about Clarke's characters.
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Eric the .5b
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Re: What's New at the Bijou?

Post by Eric the .5b »

I've read most of Asimov's science fiction, and the original Foundation trilogy is dry AF compared to his usual writing.
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JD
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Re: What's New at the Bijou?

Post by JD »

Asimov's Foundation books always seemed like the kind of thing I would like, but whenever I tried to read one I bounced off it. Maybe I'll try again one of these days.
I sort of feel like a sucker about aspiring to be intellectually rigorous when I could just go on twitter and say capitalism causes space herpes and no one will challenge me on it. - Hugh Akston
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Hugh Akston
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Re: What's New at the Bijou?

Post by Hugh Akston »

Present me traveling forward thinks that Nolan movies are complex and Tenet will require multiple viewings to really get and appreciate what he's up to. But future me traveling backwards assures me that no, it's actually just a bad movie.

In addition to not adequately presenting the premise through visual storytelling, the dialogue did nothing to clarify what was going on, and the sound editors did nothing to clarify the dialogue. Nolan has really bought into the combination of dialogue and music that assures us we don't need to concern ourselves with what people are saying.
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D.A. Ridgely
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Re: What's New at the Bijou?

Post by D.A. Ridgely »

Obviously, next to nothing is new at the Bijou. Speaking of which, I was really disappointed by Wonder Woman 1984. Even ignoring the not so thinly veiled allusions to our Commander in Orange, I kept thinking that the background music was so relentlessly dramatic, it was a shame nothing even mildly dramatic was happening most of the time on the screen. Sure, there was plenty of action, it just wasn't especially engaging. Anyway, my daughter liked it, which was the important thing and, honestly, looking at Gal Gadot for two and a half hours is a pretty good deal, so-so movie or not.
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Eric the .5b
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Re: What's New at the Bijou?

Post by Eric the .5b »

Caught Wild Mountain Thyme under dubious copyright arrangement while visiting family, because streaming services have fucked up and yarr, we all be pirates now.

Full of charming portrayals, Irish scenery porn, general Oirish bullshit, plenty of actual charm, Emily Blunt's fantastic cheekbones, and even Christopher Walken doing more acting than I've seen from him in decades despite his absolutely fucking hilarious accent.

Writing-wise, it's not sure whether it's a screwball comedy, a strange attempt at a by-the-numbers romantic comedy, or maybe even a parody of a romantic comedy. Doesn't help that romantic comedy is a fucked-up genre to begin with, but this is a weird one. The romantic leads are odd, depressive people with genuinely funny chemistry, which actually helps things...though for the longest time, it really does seem like female lead is, as the Inevitable Handsome Interloper suggests, letting a romantic childhood fantasy about the male lead who shows absolutely no interest in her ruin her life. (And given she's actively dazzled by the Interloper's brash American traits of making eye contact, smiling, and finding her attractive, holy shit.*)

Yes, the guy/girl who thaws after constant stalking is a thing in romantic comedies, but this one take it to a new level, with her mooning after a guy since age 10...a guy who's been ignoring/avoiding her up until the start of the movie, despite his farm neighboring hers. There's even an (obvious) feint to suggest that he's gay, right down to him praying to God as a child, asking why he's "this way" and botching an attempt to propose to her...which he only seems to be doing because his dying father won't let him inherit the farm if he can't continue the family. It's literally right before the climactic scene when the male lead finally indicates that he has any feelings for the female lead besides an awkward friendship.

Further, there's some bullshit about the Irish being "an indirect people" to justify the fact the female lead has never just expressed her feelings to the guy, despite the fact that she's aggressive and assertive and unconcerned about others' opinions. She truly never could just ask this guy out?

(Also, the actual explanation for why the male lead says and does some things that suggest that he's gay and why he thinks he's crazy is already blowing up in corners of the internet. You'll probably hear it before you see the movie.)

And yet, this fucked-up movie is charming. I can only shrug helplessly, even when the movie tries to straight-facedly tell me that Irish farmers don't know or care about the acreage of their family farms...



* If we're gonna pretend Emily Blunt is Just This Random Weird Girl nobody asks out, then Jon Hamm can be Just This Guy.
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Pham Nuwen
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Re: What's New at the Bijou?

Post by Pham Nuwen »

Watched Love and Monsters. Worth a watch.

Not the acting or anything. Thats terrible. The world building is incredible is all. So incredible that it over shadows the otherwise awful plot. It has an great middle piece involving Michael Rooker and a girl. But they are gone way to soon in the story. A sequel should just involve those two and the adventures they experience in search of safety.
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Kolohe
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Re: What's New at the Bijou?

Post by Kolohe »

Greyhound, the Tom Hanks WW2 battle of Atlantic flick.

If I could describe it in one word, it’s ‘efficient.’ There’s basically no B plot, just the series of decisions and commands Hanks gives as captain of a destroyer over the course of two plus days of transit between the coverage of maritime patrol aircraft, all in a runtime right at 90 minutes.

The first set piece is IMO the best, (and again, starts really early in the movie, but not actually as a cold open in media res). It’s a bit of a limitation of filmmaking that the follow on set pieces are ‘more dramatic’ with higher stakes and more losses, but more difficult to follow the action where the color palette is one shade of gray over another slightly different shade of gray - and then, all at night. (It’s also probably that my eyesight has never been great and ain’t getting better as approach a half century with this current factory installed equipment).

I could follow some stuff more readily because of experience with the commands (though since my reference frame is different I winced at some of it). I also did the Leo DiCaprio pointing at the screen thing when they showed some tools on the nav chart that I literally have from a going away gift. (I have a 1942 solid brass parallel motion staightedge with BUSHIPS engraved on it)

Anyway, worth seeing, if you’re into ‘war flicks’
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Kolohe
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Re: What's New at the Bijou?

Post by Kolohe »

Soul, the new Pixar flick is another solid outing from them. I do agree with one reviewer in that I think it stops a little bit short of fulling fleshing out its own premises and underlying tension so the resolution, while satisfying and earned, is a bit pat.
when you wake up as the queen of the n=1 kingdom and mount your steed non sequiturius, do you look out upon all you survey and think “damn, it feels good to be a green idea sleeping furiously?" - dhex
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dead_elvis
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Re: What's New at the Bijou?

Post by dead_elvis »

D.A. Ridgely wrote: 26 Dec 2020, 00:17 Speaking of which, I was really disappointed by Wonder Woman 1984.
We made the mistake of watching this last night.
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Kolohe
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Re: What's New at the Bijou?

Post by Kolohe »

Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom. I never saw Fences, the other movie production(so far) based on this series of plays (called ‘the century cycle’), so I can’t compare, but, while very good, you can see the ‘adaptation from a play’ bones on this very clearly, to the point it became a bit distracting for me.

To wit, there are a couple of extended monologues by Bossman that I think work in a theatre setting, but a bit, I dunno, saturated?, in a film setting. Not literally visually, but just a movie doesn’t lend itself to the ‘one man show’-esque performance.

I do wonder if part of it is that they basically out of time with Bozeman, and so of course couldn’t do any reshoots or other editing work. Also, the screenwriter a according to IMDb has limited experience in that role (at least as it comes to film screenplays)

But still, pretty good. Scenery chewing galore, but entertaining.
when you wake up as the queen of the n=1 kingdom and mount your steed non sequiturius, do you look out upon all you survey and think “damn, it feels good to be a green idea sleeping furiously?" - dhex
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Warren
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Re: What's New at the Bijou?

Post by Warren »

Kolohe wrote: 01 Jan 2021, 13:46 I never saw Fences...
I did. What did I think of it?
Huh, I think I liked it.
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Kolohe
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Re: What's New at the Bijou?

Post by Kolohe »

Warren wrote: 01 Jan 2021, 14:29
Kolohe wrote: 01 Jan 2021, 13:46 I never saw Fences...
I did. What did I think of it?
Huh, I think I liked it.
It’s possible that Ma Rainey is Viola Davis being even more her Viola Davisest
when you wake up as the queen of the n=1 kingdom and mount your steed non sequiturius, do you look out upon all you survey and think “damn, it feels good to be a green idea sleeping furiously?" - dhex
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