Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

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D.A. Ridgely
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by D.A. Ridgely »

My son rarely posts links but just posted this link on Twitter. I don't know enough to understand, let alone analyse it so I thought I'd let you big brain types (I'm looking at you, Warren!) tell me what to think.

zkPorter: a breakthrough in L2 scaling
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Warren
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by Warren »

D.A. Ridgely wrote: 13 Apr 2021, 20:02 My son rarely posts links but just posted this link on Twitter. I don't know enough to understand, let alone analyse it so I thought I'd let you big brain types (I'm looking at you, Warren!) tell me what to think.

zkPorter: a breakthrough in L2 scaling
I didn't get all of that, but I got enough to know what they're talking about.

The problem of scalability in crypto was identified at birth. There are several schools of thought about how to solve this and they've been duking it out in the market place. From what I've seen, it's mostly about creating one sort of clearing house or another, where transactions can be processed quickly and then moved onto the supporting blockchain at a later time.

BitCoin was invented to be BitCoin. But Ethereum was designed to be a platform upon which other things could be built. Other things like other crypto currencies (i.e. tokens) with their own special features, but also smart contracts and such. A lot of activity has been happening in this area recently with great success, but also running up against the problem of scalability. (Google "decentralized finance" to learn more).

This paper says that they have a solution to the problem that is a leapfrog advance. They'll achieve this with two tokens, one being ultra fast and the other being ultra secure, BUT
Both parts will be composable and interoperable: contracts and accounts on the zkRollup side will be able to seamlessly interact with accounts on the zkPorter side, and vice versa.
Making the system both fast and secure and (very important) transparent to the end user.
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by Aresen »

The headline is misleading. That is the calculated total number over the whole 2.4 million years the species existed.

'Like Godzilla, but actually real': study shows T. rex numbered 2.5 billion

According to the study, the population at any one time was around 20,000. That's still a lot of T. Rex, though, especially as their range is estimated at 890,000 square miles. Crunching the numbers, that would mean, on average, the nearest T. Rex was only 4 miles away.

A human would be the T. Rex equivalent of a two-bite brownie.
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Eric the .5b
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by Eric the .5b »

Aresen wrote: 15 Apr 2021, 22:49According to the study, the population at any one time was around 20,000. That's still a lot of T. Rex, though, especially as their range is estimated at 890,000 square miles. Crunching the numbers, that would mean, on average, the nearest T. Rex was only 4 miles away.
The range is disputed, mind, and might have been be significantly larger.
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

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New research is suggesting why LSD has the effects it does.
Each volunteer underwent two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans, two weeks apart. Before one of the scans, they were given salty water as a placebo, and before the other they were given 75 micrograms of LSD dissolved in salty water.
...
LSD temporarily reorganized the traffic of the brain, triggering communication between regions that don't normally interact. Instead of traveling well-worn superhighways, brain signals took circuitous routes through tiny backroads to distant locales in the brain.
...
"LSD changes the parts of our brain that can chat," Luppi said. Specifically, the change in traffic temporarily altered the way the brain takes in and categorizes information from the outside world. They also found that the effects of the drug on brain function were not constant over the entire duration of the psychedelic experience.
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thoreau
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by thoreau »

There are viruses that use a 5th DNA letter, commonly called Z.

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-01157-x

These viruses apparently only infect bacteria. But if we can get them into humans I'm sure we can create an army of powerful mutants.
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D.A. Ridgely
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by D.A. Ridgely »

thoreau wrote: 01 May 2021, 15:46 There are viruses that use a 5th DNA letter, commonly called Z.

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-01157-x

These viruses apparently only infect bacteria. But if we can get them into humans I'm sure we can create an army of powerful mutants.
Finally! A use for Generation Z!
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by JD »

The Parker Solar Probe is now the closest-ever human-made object to the sun, at about 0.07 AU. By way of comparison, even Mercury's perihelion is about 0.31 AU. I think I am so fond of the Parker Solar Probe partly because it reminds me of Ray Bradbury's story "The Golden Apples of the Sun", about taking a cup full of fire from the Sun.
I sort of feel like a sucker about aspiring to be intellectually rigorous when I could just go on twitter and say capitalism causes space herpes and no one will challenge me on it. - Hugh Akston
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