Post Urbanism?

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Ellie
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Joined: 21 Apr 2010, 18:34

Re: Post Urbanism?

Post by Ellie »

Highway wrote: 13 Feb 2021, 23:28I'm hoping that my workplaces keep the accommodations to continue to work from home even as some or most people are back in the office. Allow for meetings via Zoom / Teams / Google Meet, especially for inter-organization meetings. Personally, I'm probably past a point where it would hold me back for promotion or anything to not be in the office (I am pretty much at the ceiling of what I'm going to do, and having consciously resisted moving into management, I think that has passed me by, which is mostly welcome, although a little bit regretful), but I can see people not in the office being thought of as less productive, less 'present', which could affect them.
As a single parent with four children I hope never to have to send to school, I am very hopeful that my workplace does let me continue WFH or I can find a similar job that does. I'm also hoping that they'll let me switch my "two days in the building per month" to be for coming to take pictures at events -- the one thing that I'm REALLY feeling the lack of; even if most of our events are online right now, we still need pictures to advertise them, and nobody else is giving me ANYTHING to work with. Instead of having to use two days on fucking STAFF MEETINGS argh argh argh
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Highway
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Joined: 12 May 2011, 00:22
Location: the Electric Ocean

Re: Post Urbanism?

Post by Highway »

Ellie wrote: 14 Feb 2021, 20:10
Highway wrote: 13 Feb 2021, 23:28I'm hoping that my workplaces keep the accommodations to continue to work from home even as some or most people are back in the office. Allow for meetings via Zoom / Teams / Google Meet, especially for inter-organization meetings. Personally, I'm probably past a point where it would hold me back for promotion or anything to not be in the office (I am pretty much at the ceiling of what I'm going to do, and having consciously resisted moving into management, I think that has passed me by, which is mostly welcome, although a little bit regretful), but I can see people not in the office being thought of as less productive, less 'present', which could affect them.
As a single parent with four children I hope never to have to send to school, I am very hopeful that my workplace does let me continue WFH or I can find a similar job that does. I'm also hoping that they'll let me switch my "two days in the building per month" to be for coming to take pictures at events -- the one thing that I'm REALLY feeling the lack of; even if most of our events are online right now, we still need pictures to advertise them, and nobody else is giving me ANYTHING to work with. Instead of having to use two days on fucking STAFF MEETINGS argh argh argh
If you absolutely have to have staff meetings, telemeetings are the best way to have them. I've addressed many issues during our meetings by being able to look for answers while the meeting continues, rather than the ol' "Let me check and get back to you." Plus, the meetings we've had have worked well to keep the community aspect of that group going through this pandemic. The other groups I work for don't have more than weekly meetings together, and they're much more focused on current tasks than group cohesiveness. So they don't really fulfill that "keep us thinking as a team" need.
Well, that was a long walk down a windy beach to a cafe that was closed...
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Jasper
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Joined: 27 Apr 2010, 07:56
Location: Newyorkachusetts

Re: Post Urbanism?

Post by Jasper »

Personally, I'm Team Highway. If I didn't have a couple of minions that need to be physically in the lab to do their jobs, I'd be wfh a lot more.

As it is, I'm angling for a position (lateral move with broader responsibilities and better advancement opportunities) that will allow me that freedom.
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Hugh Akston
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Re: Post Urbanism?

Post by Hugh Akston »

Interesting look at the data of where people are moving during the Great Covid Migration
A year into the Covid-19 pandemic, after much speculation about emptied downtowns and the prospect of remote work, the clearest picture yet is emerging about how people moved. There is no urban exodus; perhaps it’s more of an urban shuffle. Despite talk of mass moves to Florida and Texas, data shows most people who did move stayed close to where they came from—although Sun Belt regions that were popular even before the pandemic did see gains.
Those Americans who did move accelerated a trend that predates the pandemic: Dense core counties of major U.S. metro areas saw a net decrease in flow into the city, while other suburbs and some smaller cities saw net gains. In other words, people moved outward. Outward to the suburbs of their own core metro area, but also farther out, to satellite cities or even other major urban centers that might still give people proximity to their region. As CityLab contributor Richard Florida has noted, the pandemic compressed into a matter of months moves that might have happened in the next few years anyway.
“The phrase or the concept of urban exodus, that really only applies to New York and San Francisco,” said Stephan D. Whitaker, a policy economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland who’s been analyzing migration patterns during the pandemic.
Even in the biggest metro areas, most people didn’t go very far. In the country’s 50 most populous cities, 84% of the moves were to somewhere within the perimeter of the central metro area, down just slightly from pre-pandemic levels. Many of the most local moves were likely related to the economic downturn: A February Pew Research Center survey of those who moved during the pandemic found that the most common reason people cited was financial distress including job loss.
Even for people who said their moves were permanent, wealth was the dominant explanation for the jump in moves in New York City’s five boroughs. While people across incomes continued to move around as they had before the pandemic, it was higher-income zip codes that saw a sharp change in movement at the height of the pandemic.
Some impacts of the past year’s migration have already set in. Rents declined in New York City and other expensive urban centers during the pandemic, while they soared in some less affluent regions that saw migration increase, such as Sacramento, research from Zumper shows. And while there are signs that this trend is already reversing, it will take years for rents in expensive urban areas to return to where they were before the pandemic. That has some analysts talking about a structural shift in what landlords can charge. Higher-end apartment buildings in San Francisco, for instance, may be worth about 20% less today than they were before the pandemic, according to Green Street, a real estate research and data firm.

In New York City, this shift has already freed up more homes for Section 8 affordable housing vouchers.
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JasonL
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Joined: 05 May 2010, 17:22

Re: Post Urbanism?

Post by JasonL »

I just had a chat with someone who indicated large insurance companies use their own corporate real estate as a key portfolio strategy - hence all the skyscrapers with insurance company branding. If urban commercial real estate takes a years long dump, it's bad bad bad for insurance cos.
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