Speaking in tongues (the "learning languages" thread)

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Jadagul
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Re: Speaking in tongues (the "learning languages" thread)

Post by Jadagul »

For what it's worth, the Chinese restaurant owners apparently loved it when my little sister talked to them in Mandarin.

(She has an obnoxious gift for languages and was conversational in Mandarin after like a year of high school study.)
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thoreau
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Re: Speaking in tongues (the "learning languages" thread)

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Mo wrote: 17 Dec 2020, 03:01 Dojito and Mojito are learning Chinese at school and it's pretty adorable and funny. Dojito in particular has taken a shining to it. The cab drivers here love it and encourage them both. I'm a bit concerned about them learning a language neither I nor their mother can understand. Also, a minor concern is if we go back to the US, randomly speaking Chinese to Asian Americans.
I think that most people would recognize the difference between being addressed in real Chinese with a Singapore accent, and being addressed with white boy "Knee how."
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Jennifer
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Re: Speaking in tongues (the "learning languages" thread)

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That Spanish nature-documentary stream showed a few Spanish-dubbed episodes of something which I think is called "My underwater friends" -- two kids plus a talking sea turtle swimming in the sea observing animals. Ironic, in that I switched channels partly to get a break from the relentless cheerfulness of kids' programming. But I think I recognize some of the Spanish voice actors; one woman/girl in "My underwater friends" sounds like Princess Holly from Ben y Holly, and the boy sounds like the turtle from Wonder Pets. (Not surprising at all, that the same relatively small groups of voice actors would handle the dubbings for multiple series.)
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Mo
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Re: Speaking in tongues (the "learning languages" thread)

Post by Mo »

Jennifer wrote:
Mo wrote: 17 Dec 2020, 03:01 Dojito and Mojito are learning Chinese at school and it's pretty adorable and funny. Dojito in particular has taken a shining to it. The cab drivers here love it and encourage them both. I'm a bit concerned about them learning a language neither I nor their mother can understand. Also, a minor concern is if we go back to the US, randomly speaking Chinese to Asian Americans.
If you do go back to the US, it would be cool (despite your valid child-conspiracy concerns) if you could somehow continue their Chinese lessons, say with a tutor. At their ages, the language-acquisition parts of their brains are like little sponges, absorbing everything. (If they'd been watching Spanish TV as long as I have, by now they probably WOULD be able to speak and understand it at least well enough to fully comprehend each show I've seen.) And when they're adults, knowing Chinese well enough to comfortably get by in the language will be a VERY valuable skill.
That’s the plan. It’s quite funny and adorable to watch them take it up.
his voice is so soothing, but why do conspiracy nuts always sound like Batman and Robin solving one of Riddler's puzzles out loud? - fod

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lunchstealer
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Re: Speaking in tongues (the "learning languages" thread)

Post by lunchstealer »

[Mo|Do]jito, for one, welcomes our new Chinese overlords.

Also now they can terrify MAGAs.

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Jennifer
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Re: Speaking in tongues (the "learning languages" thread)

Post by Jennifer »

I don't know if this is a limitation in actual everyday spoken/colloquial Spanish vocabulary compared to spoken English, or merely a limitation on the part of whoever translated "Max and Ruby" for Nick Latino (side note: if I had the actual fluency in whatever language to be an English-to-whatever and Whatever-to-English translator, I bet that would be a SUPER-fun job): there's an episode where the kids are play-pretending they're pirates on a pirate adventure. I've never seen or heard the episode in English, but if I did, I'm sure I'd've heard many repetitions of either "Arr, mateys" or "Arr, me mateys" because that's a common English-language storybook-pirate cliche. When the episode aired in Spanish, I heard many repetitions of "Arr, amigos," and now that I think about it, I'm pretty sure I've heard pirate characters in other Spanish preschool shows say "Arr, amigos" too. If any used a different translation of "Arr, mateys," I haven't noticed (especially since trilling Rs, which in English are only "piratey," are already commonplace in Spanish). Granted, "amigos" and "me mateys" have identical numbers of syllables and even identical emphasized syllables, which would make them a useful switch when translating songs or TV dubbings where rhythm and timing especially matter -- though I expect original-Spanish storybook pirates say "Arr amigos" too, not just translations of English ones.

"Mateys" is obviously a slangy version of "mates," which in British/Commonwealth English is a fairly common synonym for "friend" (though in American colloquial English, "mate" is more commonly used in reference to romantic or sexual partners). Sometimes people might have "pals" or "chums," too, well-known enough that even young children in Nick Jr.'s target audience are likely to know those words. I don't know yet if everyday spoken Spanish has such synonyms, let alone common slangy pronunciations (such as when "mate" becomes "matey"). Given that Spanish grammar is already based heavily on modifying words via changing their prefixes or suffixes -- I gather things like the -ito ending meaning "little" is NOT slangy or casual, but standard everyday or even formal Spanish -- I don't know if they have anything equivalent to "saying 'matey' instead of 'mate' is something pirates do."
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Kolohe
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Re: Speaking in tongues (the "learning languages" thread)

Post by Kolohe »

the -ito thing is common enough in Spanish grammar, but making it an appellation (i.e nickname or term of address), instead of just a adjective, is a bit slangy & casual.
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