Setec Astronomy

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Mo
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Re: Setec Astronomy

Post by Mo »

JasonL wrote: 11 Feb 2020, 22:04 I have the concern about huawei and don’t have a particular take about us having monitoring capability. I mean it’s bad but not the same as chi coms with finger on the pulse. I don’t want China with that kind of ability.
The difference being that lots of folks assumed the company was clean and didn’t do due diligence. With Huawei because of the presumption of guilt, a lot more due diligence will be done than if it was someone like Qualcomm or someone else from a friendly country.
his voice is so soothing, but why do conspiracy nuts always sound like Batman and Robin solving one of Riddler's puzzles out loud? - fod

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Hugh Akston
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Re: Setec Astronomy

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Long read by a journalist who has met with Snowden
The MacBook Air I used for everyday computing seemed another likely target. I sent a forensic image of its working memory to a leading expert on the security of the Macintosh operating system. He found unexpected daemons running on my machine, serving functions he could not ascertain. (A daemon is a background computing process, and most of them are benign, but the satanic flavor of the term seemed fitting here.) Some software exploits burrow in and make themselves very hard to remove, even if you wipe and reinstall the operating system, so I decided to abandon the laptop.
I acquired a heavy safe for my office in New York as well. I will not enumerate every step I took to keep my work secure, but they were many and varied and sometimes befuddled me. The computers we used for the NSA archive were specially locked down. Soltani and I used laptops from which we’d removed the Wi-Fi and Bluetooth hardware, and disconnected the batteries. If a stranger appeared at the door, we merely had to tug on the quick-release power cables to switch off and re-encrypt the machines instantly. We stored the laptops in the vault and kept encryption keys on hardware, itself encrypted, that we took away with us each time we left the room, even for bathroom breaks. We sealed the USB ports. I disconnected and locked up the internet-router switch in my New York office every night. I dabbed epoxy and glitter on the screws along the bottom of all my machines, to help detect tampering in my absence. (The glitter dries in unique, random patterns.) A security expert had told me that detection of compromise was as important as prevention, so I experimented with ultraviolet powder on the dial of my safe in New York. (Photographing dust patterns under a UV flashlight beam turns out to be messy.) I kept my digital notes in multiple encrypted volumes, arranging the files in such a way that I had to type five long passwords just to start work every day.
I know perfectly well that government agencies prefer not to read their secrets on the front page. Sometimes they resent a story enough to investigate. How in the blazes did the reporter find that out? In serious cases maybe the Justice Department steps in. I knew all that—but despite years of reporting on government secrets, I had not often experienced it personally. So, in the summer of 2013, when I came across my own name in the NSA archive Snowden had shared with me, I gawped at the screen and bit back an impulse to swear.
But our government clearly doesn’t see it that way. Here are some facts I’ve learned, through Freedom of Information Act requests and a lawsuit I filed to enforce them, about various government actions that involve me. The Office of the Director of National Intelligence said it had completely withheld 435 documents about me, but its explanation was classified and my lawyers at the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press were not allowed to read it. Homeland Security personnel, I learned from one document, had produced a 76-page report of every international flight I’d taken since 1983. Customs inspectors had secretly searched my checked baggage when I returned from more than one overseas reporting trip. The reasons for and results of those searches were redacted. Hundreds of emails recorded behind-the-scenes reactions and internal debates about how to respond to my questions or stories. The government asked the court to withhold all of those on grounds of deliberative privilege.
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Warren
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Re: Setec Astronomy

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TIL
gawp
/ɡôp/
Learn to pronounce
verbinformal•British
past tense: gawped; past participle: gawped

stare openly in a stupid or rude manner.
"what are you gawping at ?"

Origin
late 17th century: perhaps an alteration of gape.
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Warren
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Re: Setec Astronomy

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Okay this shit is making my skin crawl.
So I'm reading Hugh's Atlantic article and I've got my Mail program open. I can see the inbox behind my browser. All of a sudden two years of emails disappear from my inbox. Like *poof* just gone in a wink. Now they seem to be coming back. Down at the bottom, my Mail program is telling me it's Downloading Messages (currently 693 of 4890, but both those number keep getting bigger) and my inbox seems to be repopulating.

AFAICT it's only my general use/give to anyone/spam account that was affected and only on my Mail program, my email server seems unaffected.
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Eric the .5b
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Re: Setec Astronomy

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That sounds more like a network hiccup or an error in the email program than anything else.
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Re: Setec Astronomy

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Eric the .5b wrote: 20 May 2020, 21:18 That sounds more like a network hiccup or an error in the email program than anything else.
I'm sure. It was just the coincidence of it.
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Hugh Akston
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Re: Setec Astronomy

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Cancelling an uncompetitive product is always a good business decision, but doubly so when you can score a few PR points in the process
IBM is getting out of the facial recognition business, saying it’s concerned about how the technology can be used for mass surveillance and racial profiling.
IBM is one of several big tech firms that had earlier sought to improve the accuracy of their face-scanning software after research found racial and gender disparities. But its new CEO is now questioning whether it should be used by police at all.

“We believe now is the time to begin a national dialogue on whether and how facial recognition technology should be employed by domestic law enforcement agencies,” wrote CEO Arvind Krishna in a letter sent Monday to U.S. lawmakers.
IBM’s decision to stop building and selling facial recognition software is unlikely to affect its bottom line, since the tech giant is increasingly focused on cloud computing while an array of lesser-known firms have cornered the market for government facial recognition contracts.
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JasonL
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Re: Setec Astronomy

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That particular case is reflective of a culture takeover that came with the acquisition of Red Hat by IBM. Arvind was the architect of that deal by IBM and was named CEO, and the former head of Red Hat was named President at IBM. They are trying hard to send signals everywhere that they are now a silicon valley type tech firm.
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Mo
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Re: Setec Astronomy

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JasonL wrote: 10 Jun 2020, 08:26 That particular case is reflective of a culture takeover that came with the acquisition of Red Hat by IBM. Arvind was the architect of that deal by IBM and was named CEO, and the former head of Red Hat was named President at IBM. They are trying hard to send signals everywhere that they are now a silicon valley type tech firm.
I mean their revenue is down >25% (in nominal terms) since I worked there 9 years, they kinda need a full cultural housecleaning.

https://www.macrotrends.net/stocks/char ... bm/revenue
his voice is so soothing, but why do conspiracy nuts always sound like Batman and Robin solving one of Riddler's puzzles out loud? - fod

no one ever yells worldstar when a pet gets fucked up - dhex
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Aresen
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Re: Setec Astronomy

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Mo wrote: 12 Feb 2020, 03:08
JasonL wrote: 11 Feb 2020, 22:04 I have the concern about huawei and don’t have a particular take about us having monitoring capability. I mean it’s bad but not the same as chi coms with finger on the pulse. I don’t want China with that kind of ability.
The difference being that lots of folks assumed the company was clean and didn’t do due diligence. With Huawei because of the presumption of guilt, a lot more due diligence will be done than if it was someone like Qualcomm or someone else from a friendly country.
The behavior of the Chinese government in the case of Meng Wanzhou has made it perfectly clear that the Chinese government regards Huawei as an organ of the Chinese state. No effing way Huawei should be trusted with critical infrastructure.
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JD
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Re: Setec Astronomy

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This could admittedly go in a whole bunch of threads. I got home yesterday and discovered I'd received something in the mail, which I was not expecting, and the return address was "Ingram Micro CFS", which didn't provide a clue. Opening it, I discovered a Google Nest Mini with a note saying "Happy Holidays from your Google Cloud Services account team!" That makes some sense, since my employer spends a ton with them.

Still, I'm tempted to write a letter back saying
Dear Google,

Thank you for sending me your cheapest piece of spyware...
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Number 6
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Re: Setec Astronomy

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JD wrote: 03 Jan 2021, 11:23 This could admittedly go in a whole bunch of threads. I got home yesterday and discovered I'd received something in the mail, which I was not expecting, and the return address was "Ingram Micro CFS", which didn't provide a clue. Opening it, I discovered a Google Nest Mini with a note saying "Happy Holidays from your Google Cloud Services account team!" That makes some sense, since my employer spends a ton with them.

Still, I'm tempted to write a letter back saying
Dear Google,

Thank you for sending me your cheapest piece of spyware...
Google has sent me two of those things over the past year or so. I'm on Google Fi and have their fiber internet service (which is just as good as they say), so I imagine that is why. While I'm at least a little concerned about giving corporate spies access to my home,* I've still got those plugged in, though I use Alexa for most smart home stuff.

*And yet I use the brave browser and every ad block extension I can.
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Re: Setec Astronomy

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I have a Google home mini if someone wants that. I also have a chromecast v1 but that's being used so my wife can watch netflixes new panethnic bodice ripper.
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Re: Setec Astronomy

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U.K. judge refuses extradition of WikiLeaks founder Assange
A British judge on Monday rejected the United States’ request to extradite WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange to face espionage charges, saying he was likely to kill himself if held under harsh U.S. prison conditions.

District Judge Vanessa Baraitser ruled that extradition would be “oppressive” because of Assange's mental health.
The reason may be dubious, but I'll take it.

:D
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Hugh Akston
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Re: Setec Astronomy

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Not subjecting someone to America's prison system is definitely reason enough to deny extradition.
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Eric the .5b
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Re: Setec Astronomy

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Hugh Akston wrote: 04 Jan 2021, 13:52 Not subjecting someone to America's prison system is definitely reason enough to deny extradition.
Assuming he even stayed in the court system and didn't end up in a black site.

I mean the guy's probably a rapist and should have been tried, but as much as people have mocked his fears of being sent to the US....as soon as he was out of that embassy, the US tried to get him.
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Re: Setec Astronomy

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Eric the .5b wrote: 04 Jan 2021, 19:54
Hugh Akston wrote: 04 Jan 2021, 13:52 Not subjecting someone to America's prison system is definitely reason enough to deny extradition.
Assuming he even stayed in the court system and didn't end up in a black site.

I mean the guy's probably a rapist and should have been tried, but as much as people have mocked his fears of being sent to the US....as soon as he was out of that embassy, the US tried to get him.
Yup. I've never looked at the evidence that he's a rapist. His real crime was embarrassing people with a lot to lose.
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Re: Setec Astronomy

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I still can't see the difference between Assange and journalists, regarding his publication of secret info obtained from anonymous sources. If he's a felon then so are a lot of reporters at the WaPo and NYT.
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