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Corporate America Discovers the Limits of Political Posturing as a Marketing Tactic

Posted: 24 Oct 2019, 09:49
by Ellie
https://reason.com/2019/10/22/corporate ... ng-tactic/

I'll admit I read this with maybe 70% of my full attention while in line at the bank, so perhaps I missed an essential part of the article. But I don't see how things like Blizzard and the NBA are discovering the limits of political posturing and now pulling back to a politically neutral view. If anything, it would be politically neutral to let individual gamers and players make political pronouncements, and then shrug when Chinese investors get mad and say, "We don't take political stances." I think kowtowing to Chinese butthurt is political posturing, just a bootlicking posture, and I would love to see Blizzard and the NBA discover its limits when they lose customer support here for siding with China.

Re: Corporate America Discovers the Limits of Political Posturing as a Marketing Tactic

Posted: 24 Oct 2019, 10:27
by Warren
Ellie wrote: 24 Oct 2019, 09:49 https://reason.com/2019/10/22/corporate ... ng-tactic/

I'll admit I read this with maybe 70% of my full attention while in line at the bank, so perhaps I missed an essential part of the article. But I don't see how things like Blizzard and the NBA are discovering the limits of political posturing and now pulling back to a politically neutral view. If anything, it would be politically neutral to let individual gamers and players make political pronouncements, and then shrug when Chinese investors get mad and say, "We don't take political stances." I think kowtowing to Chinese butthurt is political posturing, just a bootlicking posture, and I would love to see Blizzard and the NBA discover its limits when they lose customer support here for siding with China.
That's the whole a point of the article. Are you sure it wasn't more like 65% of your attention?

ETA
ReRTFA It's not as explicitly "customers are revolting as I thought."

Re: Corporate America Discovers the Limits of Political Posturing as a Marketing Tactic

Posted: 25 Oct 2019, 03:13
by Eric the .5b
Ellie wrote: 24 Oct 2019, 09:49 https://reason.com/2019/10/22/corporate ... ng-tactic/

I'll admit I read this with maybe 70% of my full attention while in line at the bank, so perhaps I missed an essential part of the article. But I don't see how things like Blizzard and the NBA are discovering the limits of political posturing and now pulling back to a politically neutral view.
Eh. When it comes to China, there is no "politically neutral" response for these companies. Every possible response from, "STFU about Hong Kong, guys!" to "Sorry, but we don't police our players' expression of their opinions..." strikes a political posture, much as Tuccille wants to pretend that the latter is some apolitical default thing and somehow not a classical liberal argument in direct conflict with the values of the PRC regime.

(Really, I can't help noticing that Tuccille wants Blizzard and the NBA to take a political stance he supports, while sneering at companies that take stances that Blues like, including opposing police brutality, But then, I don't really buy the idea Tuccille parrots that you can separate "true values" from "political positions" when it comes to "brands".)

I'm also at least sympathetic to claims that this is true about other issues. Though, actually, it doesn't matter whether you or me or any of us think this is true about an issue. If enough people consider a company's action to be politically freighted, it's true—at least to the extent that the dynamic Tuccille talks about applies, and the company has to pick who they piss off and who they try to make happy. There's no neutral response when some people holler that your holiday cup is anti-Christian because it's plain red; you either make them happy or you piss them off, and making them happy will probably piss someone else off. There's no automatic neutrality when you opt to do business in a place that's just put in bathroom laws or other discriminatory practices, because some fraction of the public will see that as your endorsement of those laws. You still have to decide whether you're OK with who you might piss off with that course of action or its alternatives.

(And that's of course ignoring the possibility that maybe some decision-makers at Netflix just weren't transphobes and were offended by the law in question. Tuccille gives me the impression that he doesn't think that's a "true value", WTF ever that is.)

Re: Corporate America Discovers the Limits of Political Posturing as a Marketing Tactic

Posted: 27 Oct 2019, 16:25
by Mo
It’s like how complaining about police brutality affecting minority communities is identity politics and complaining about immigrants is just politics.