Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

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Painboy
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

Post by Painboy » 13 Nov 2018, 22:21

Andrew wrote:
13 Nov 2018, 22:08
I see only one brief mention in that massive article of the huge drop in average testosterone in the last few decades. That seems somewhat important and doesn't rely upon questionable social surveys for data.
I thought low testosterone was for the most part bunk. A way to sell more supplements. My understanding was there are a few who have it, but for most guys it's just aging. Is there good evidence of something more substantive than that?

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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

Post by Hugh Akston » 13 Nov 2018, 22:40

Painboy wrote:
13 Nov 2018, 22:21
Andrew wrote:
13 Nov 2018, 22:08
I see only one brief mention in that massive article of the huge drop in average testosterone in the last few decades. That seems somewhat important and doesn't rely upon questionable social surveys for data.
I thought low testosterone was for the most part bunk. A way to sell more supplements. My understanding was there are a few who have it, but for most guys it's just aging. Is there good evidence of something more substantive than that?
A lot of the people who are trying to sell supplements/MAGA seem to link back to this 2007 study. My cursory searching has failed to return any subsequent studies that confirm the results or posit any explanations.
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

Post by Hugh Akston » 03 Jan 2019, 19:51

Image

British Army Seeks 'Snow Flakes' And 'Me Me Me Millennials' In New Recruiting Campaign
"The Army sees people differently and we are proud to look beyond the stereotypes and spot the potential in young people, from compassion to self-belief," Major Gen. Paul Nanson said in the statement. "We understand the drive they have to succeed and recognise their need for a bigger sense of purpose in a job where they can do something meaningful."
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dhex
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

Post by dhex » 04 Jan 2019, 08:50

i gotta say it's not bad at all. not crazy about the typography but the colors and photos are good and the campaign got attention.
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Mo
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

Post by Mo » 04 Jan 2019, 09:24

Yeah, gotta say it's a pretty clever twist and better than 99% of government ad campaigns.
his voice is so soothing, but why do conspiracy nuts always sound like Batman and Robin solving one of Riddler's puzzles out loud? - fod

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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

Post by Warren » 04 Jan 2019, 10:15

Your army needs your compassion? I mean maybe if it was Canada.
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Dangerman
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

Post by Dangerman » 04 Jan 2019, 12:03

The typography is like a Tarantino movie poster.

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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

Post by dhex » 04 Jan 2019, 15:11

That's what they eree going for but the serif on the you should have been massaged better.
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Dangerman
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

Post by Dangerman » 04 Jan 2019, 16:30

The 'You' is straight out of a 30s recruitment poster imo, that's the way they're tying it up.

Eta a local actual Irish bar back home has an old bill :

"You!

Belong under the flags with your mates!"

With the same type.

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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

Post by Hugh Akston » 04 Jan 2019, 20:51

Yeah it's a font-for-font ripoff of a WWII recruitment poster. Although if they really wanted to recruit Millennial hipsters, they should have kept the mustache.
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

Post by Hugh Akston » 08 Feb 2019, 23:47

The kids are alright, it's capitalism that's the problem:
Sean Illing: The key variable you emphasize in the book is the divergence between productivity and compensation — or the fact that people are working harder while wages aren’t going up. Why is this such an important data point for you? And how has it altered the day-to-day life of millennials?

Malcolm Harris: I think it’s crucial. Marxists would refer to this as an increase in the rate of exploitation, meaning workers are working longer, harder, and more efficiently but are receiving less and less in return. I reference Marxism here (even though his name never appears in the book) because conventional American economists don’t really have a term for this — it’s not something they like to talk about because they don’t recognize that capitalism is built on exploitation.
Pretty sure even Marx knew that more productive doesn't equal working harder.
Sean Illing: I’ll offer a little pushback here: One could read your book as saying that millennials were promised a version of the American dream and simply didn’t get it. Or someone might read this and say that you’re assuming a certain level of material comfort is a kind of birthright for Americans, when in reality that’s never been the case, particularly for nonwhite Americans.

Malcolm Harris:Well, the promise that hard work will lead to a better life was definitely not just sold to white Americans. That has been sold to black Americans, to Hispanic Americans, to everyone. The American dream is not a product that is only sold to white people.

I’m not interested in arguing that millennials didn’t get what they were promised. It’s a question of exploitation. This is a fundamentally capitalist story. Workers have always been exploited, but that rate of exploitation — measured by the productivity wage gap we talked about earlier — is increasing exponentially for millennials.
Sean Illing: So I want to make sure I’m clear on what you’re saying here. You’re essentially arguing that the system is fundamentally flawed and thus there is no ultimate solution short of overthrowing it. In other words, the only solution is revolution. But that’s a very difficult thing to control or predict.

Malcolm Harris: It is. A much smarter Malcolm than I, Malcolm X, said you don’t have revolutions without bloodshed, and he was probably right. But we’re in a situation now where the ruling class feels so powerful and I’m not sure what it will take to change things.

I mean, we have thousands of Americans dead in Puerto Rico, and that’s an attack by the ruling class. You had all these vulture funds that swooped into Puerto Rico, threw them even deeper into debt, and eviscerated the public services, and people died because of it. That’s an attack by any definition.
Sean Illing: It’s hard to read your book and not walk away with a sense of fatalism about our situation. Do you see no value in pushing for meaningful social change within the system? Do you see any value in political movements that are seeking practical policy shifts that won’t overturn capitalism but might nevertheless reduce suffering?

Malcolm Harris: I definitely have a sense of fatalism about this system. I don’t think capitalism can last forever (or even much longer), and I think if you asked a bunch of ecologists, they’d agree with me. That doesn’t mean what comes next will necessarily be better, but if by “within this system” you mean liberal capitalist democracy, then no, I don’t see any real strategic possibilities there.

That said, I’m not committed to only doing the most correct things. I voted for Hillary Clinton, I volunteer with groups in my neighborhood that are focused on harm reduction, etc. I’ve even helped put on a training for the DSA [Democratic Socialists of America].

Revolution is hard, and that’s not an excuse not to participate in your community. But we have to be realistic about the possible near- and medium-term outcomes for this system, and there aren’t any good ones. We have to deal with capitalism soon, or it will deal with us.
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

Post by JasonL » 09 Feb 2019, 00:11

I hear that from left millennials all the time. It’s the “late stage capitalism” complaint.

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Hugh Akston
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

Post by Hugh Akston » 09 Feb 2019, 00:21

Well fortunately it should collapse any day now so
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

Post by JasonL » 09 Feb 2019, 00:39

It’s worth noting that the lates stage capitalism complaint about “exponential” (not close to exponential really) divergence in productivity and compensation was Marx’s first point. His view of exploitation made it obvious and wrong that wages could not go up. So we are in a new equilibrium now. We have seen a litany of Marx’s predictions fail, and now we are in a regime where productivity and wages are both stagnating.

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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

Post by Painboy » 10 Feb 2019, 14:09

Sean Illing: I’ll offer a little pushback here: One could read your book as saying that millennials were promised a version of the American dream and simply didn’t get it.
Who's promising this? I was never promised shit growing up. Being that Millennials were taught by Boomers and Gen Xers I seriously doubt they were promised anything. I'm not sure I know anyone who says the American Dream without saying "The American Dream" usually with an eye roll tossed in.

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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

Post by Warren » 10 Feb 2019, 14:19

Painboy wrote:
10 Feb 2019, 14:09
Who's promising this?
The media.
We fucked up, so we're going to need more money. - Tuco

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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

Post by JasonL » 10 Feb 2019, 14:35

I’ve never understood that argument. I get it if you are 18. I don’t get it if you are 30. How can you not know nobody can promise you anything? It’s like the first identifier of adulthood.

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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

Post by Mo » 10 Feb 2019, 15:37

It’s the myth (and facts) begins the Old Economy Steve meme coming to life.
his voice is so soothing, but why do conspiracy nuts always sound like Batman and Robin solving one of Riddler's puzzles out loud? - fod

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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

Post by Warren » 10 Feb 2019, 19:02

JasonL wrote:
10 Feb 2019, 14:35
I’ve never understood that argument. I get it if you are 18. I don’t get it if you are 30. How can you not know nobody can promise you anything? It’s like the first identifier of adulthood.
Extended adolescence. 30 isn't adulthood anymore in many important ways.
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

Post by nicole » 11 Feb 2019, 07:57

JasonL wrote:
10 Feb 2019, 14:35
I’ve never understood that argument. I get it if you are 18. I don’t get it if you are 30. How can you not know nobody can promise you anything? It’s like the first identifier of adulthood.
So...if you get it when someone is 18, in what way do you not get it?

The real question is whether you get it when someone is 5, 10, 15. All those years kids spend not killing their parents, going to school, doing what they’re supposed to, etc. Would kids even go to high school, much less to college in their current numbers, if they didn’t believe in the American Dream of earning success through hard work?
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JasonL
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

Post by JasonL » 11 Feb 2019, 09:16

Well, yes. There are certain things you may not really know until you have to pay your own bills. I think good parenting involves lessons about no promises just chances with costs and trade offs quite early on, but maybe some don’t really get it until they move out. Before that you are a child. Children have things provided for them. Their expectation is to have things provided to them.

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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

Post by nicole » 11 Feb 2019, 12:53

I'm just...skeptical that there are that many "good parents" telling their kids something much more true than "that hard work will lead to a better life." I mean, how many parents (let alone teachers, guidance counselors, etc.) are telling kids, "Well, if you work hard you might be successful, but you also might not, and the same goes for if you don't work hard...theoretically working hard will give you a better shot, but..."? What kids are actually taught are things like "if you do what people tell you to do you'll be rewarded and if you do what they tell you not to do you'll be punished," which make kids easier for adults to deal with but also teach them to expect a justice that doesn't exist outside those walled gardens. They read fables and fairy tales where everyone gets what's coming to them at the end. How many parents tell their kids things like, "Don't worry, everything will be okay" instead of "Yes, you are alone in an uncaring universe and neither of us can even tell the other is real"?

Of course, this isn't unique to millennials' upbringings, and most millennials are set to reenact it.

...

Seriously though, how many parents are prepared to tell their kids, "Your life as an adult might be worse than mine is"? Like, zero, right? Mine definitely could not have processed that.
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

Post by lunchstealer » 11 Feb 2019, 13:00

There are probably a lot of bitter parents telling kids, 'fuck it work will keep you fed.'
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

Post by Dangerman » 11 Feb 2019, 13:14

Well, contrast all this with a society that believes that anyone who is failing needs help via a safety net, then you have to address the question of what level of failure deserves help, and what about people who are only a bit behind the curve?

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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

Post by JasonL » 11 Feb 2019, 14:20

I can’t digest the willful blindness into college years. You can’t know anything about the world at all and think someone can promise you great outcomes really really.

I can only make sense of it as some kind of thing like The Secret where you choose to replace what you know with wishes and fairy dust because what you know isn’t fun. In which case- fuck you, you big baby.

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