Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

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JD
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by JD » 24 May 2017, 14:50

A neat diagram for a variety of materials. Comes from an article on "high-entropy alloys", which are (if I understand correctly) alloys made with nearly equal amounts of five or more metals, like CrMnFeCoNi, and which tend to have some interesting properties.

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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by dbcooper » 24 May 2017, 15:55

The prof in the article conducted my oral qualifying exam. Nice guy!
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by JD » 24 May 2017, 16:43

Researchers at Washington State University have created material with negative mass, which displays some unusual properties. Now, it was a Bose-Einstein condensate of rubidium atoms, so not exactly an everyday item, but it still sounds significant.
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by JD » 31 May 2017, 11:31

This is some pretty cool research:
A study led by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and the University of Tubingen in Germany managed to plug some of those genetic gaps. Researchers wrung genetic material from 151 Egyptian mummies, radiocarbon dated between Egypt's New Kingdom (the oldest at 1388 B.C.) to the Roman Period (the youngest at 426 A.D.), as reported Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications.
This is going to piss off some people, though:
“The other big surprise,” Krause said, “was we didn't find much sub-Saharan African ancestry.”
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by nicole » 31 May 2017, 11:35

JD wrote:This is some pretty cool research:
A study led by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and the University of Tubingen in Germany managed to plug some of those genetic gaps. Researchers wrung genetic material from 151 Egyptian mummies, radiocarbon dated between Egypt's New Kingdom (the oldest at 1388 B.C.) to the Roman Period (the youngest at 426 A.D.), as reported Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications.
This is going to piss off some people, though:
“The other big surprise,” Krause said, “was we didn't find much sub-Saharan African ancestry.”
Actual scientists were surprised by that?
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by Aresen » 31 May 2017, 11:57

nicole wrote:
JD wrote:This is some pretty cool research:
A study led by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and the University of Tubingen in Germany managed to plug some of those genetic gaps. Researchers wrung genetic material from 151 Egyptian mummies, radiocarbon dated between Egypt's New Kingdom (the oldest at 1388 B.C.) to the Roman Period (the youngest at 426 A.D.), as reported Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications.
This is going to piss off some people, though:
“The other big surprise,” Krause said, “was we didn't find much sub-Saharan African ancestry.”
Actual scientists were surprised by that?
Probably not. After all, historical genetic research in other locations has shown long-term genetic continuity in the population.

It is going to piss off the Afrocentrists, though.
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by JD » 31 May 2017, 15:49

Pilobolus is a fungus that grows on herbivore dung. It can also "see", after a fashion, and launch its sporangia at an acceleration of 20,000G:
The sporangiophore has the remarkable ability of orienting itself to point directly towards a light source. The subsporangial vesicle acts as a lens, focusing light via carotenoid pigments deposited near the base of the vesicle. The developing sporangiophore grows such that the maturing sporangium is aimed directly at the light.

When turgor pressure within the subsporangial vesicle builds to a sufficient level (often 7 ATM or greater), the sporangium is launched, and can travel anywhere from a couple of centimeters to a distance of 2 meters (6 ft). For a sporangiophore less than 1 cm tall, this involves acceleration from 0 to 20 km/h in only 2 µs, subjecting it to over 20 000 G, equivalent to a human being launched at 100 times the speed of sound (33 831 m/s at sea level, 121 791,6 km/h). The orientation of the stalk towards the early morning sun apparently guarantees that the sporangium is shot some distance from the excrement, enhancing the chances that it will attach to vegetation and be eaten by a new host.
And there are some stowaway rocket riders, too:
The forcible discharge mechanism of Pilobolus is exploited by parasitic nematodes including lungworms in the genus Dictyocaulus. Larval lungworm nematodes excreted by infected deer, elk, cattle, horses, and other hosts climb up Pilobolus sporangiophores and are discharged with the sporangium.
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by thoreau » 31 May 2017, 16:11

nicole wrote:
JD wrote:This is some pretty cool research:
A study led by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and the University of Tubingen in Germany managed to plug some of those genetic gaps. Researchers wrung genetic material from 151 Egyptian mummies, radiocarbon dated between Egypt's New Kingdom (the oldest at 1388 B.C.) to the Roman Period (the youngest at 426 A.D.), as reported Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications.
This is going to piss off some people, though:
“The other big surprise,” Krause said, “was we didn't find much sub-Saharan African ancestry.”
Actual scientists were surprised by that?
I was under the impression that while few scientists thought the ancient Egyptians were dark-skinned blacks, there was some question as to just how mixed up their lineage might be. A finding of hardly any sub-Saharan DNA is interesting.
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by JasonL » 31 May 2017, 16:14

I'm out of the loop. Whats the current version of cradle of civilization? Multiple pockets?

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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by Painboy » 31 May 2017, 16:41

Aresen wrote:
nicole wrote:
JD wrote:This is some pretty cool research:
A study led by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and the University of Tubingen in Germany managed to plug some of those genetic gaps. Researchers wrung genetic material from 151 Egyptian mummies, radiocarbon dated between Egypt's New Kingdom (the oldest at 1388 B.C.) to the Roman Period (the youngest at 426 A.D.), as reported Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications.
This is going to piss off some people, though:
“The other big surprise,” Krause said, “was we didn't find much sub-Saharan African ancestry.”
Actual scientists were surprised by that?
Probably not. After all, historical genetic research in other locations has shown long-term genetic continuity in the population.

It is going to piss off the Afrocentrists, though.
Which is kind of goofy when you think about it. "Africa" is just a convenient name for the contiguous continent. It doesn't mean the residents are from the same cultural background or share racial traits. North Africa is much more part of the Mediterranean than Sub-Saharan Africa.

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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by Mo » 31 May 2017, 17:02

thoreau wrote:
nicole wrote:
JD wrote:This is some pretty cool research:
A study led by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and the University of Tubingen in Germany managed to plug some of those genetic gaps. Researchers wrung genetic material from 151 Egyptian mummies, radiocarbon dated between Egypt's New Kingdom (the oldest at 1388 B.C.) to the Roman Period (the youngest at 426 A.D.), as reported Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications.
This is going to piss off some people, though:
“The other big surprise,” Krause said, “was we didn't find much sub-Saharan African ancestry.”
Actual scientists were surprised by that?
I was under the impression that while few scientists thought the ancient Egyptians were dark-skinned blacks, there was some question as to just how mixed up their lineage might be. A finding of hardly any sub-Saharan DNA is interesting.
I think some of the confusion comes from the whole Nubian thing. The Nubians definitely hooked up with ancient Egyptians and were quite dark, but they were not sub-Saharan. Today they would be southern Egyptian/northern Sudanese.
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by thoreau » 31 May 2017, 17:15

Also, wouldn't mummies be from the higher classes? If so, then mummy DNA doesn't necessarily tell you much about what some random wheat farmer's ancestry is, just the elite classes.

Maybe Egyptian commoners were dark-skinned brothers being kept down by white men from Europe and Anatolia.
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by Aresen » 01 Jun 2017, 11:39

There has been another gravitational wave detection.

Merger of two black holes approx 30 solar masses and 20 solar masses, 3 billion years ago.
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by Aresen » 07 Jun 2017, 10:18

This New Scientist website article: General relativity passes test at Milky Way’s central black hole
is extremely frustrating in that it says the measurements agreed with General Relativity, but does not explain how the observations match GR (as opposed to Newtonian mechanics, I presume.)

I expected a little better from New Scientist.
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by JD » 07 Jun 2017, 14:58

A very interesting article at Nature about examining the history of life on Earth from the perspective of available energy sources, from geochemical to sunlight to oxygen to flesh to fire: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41559-017-0138
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by Jadagul » 07 Jun 2017, 19:05

Aresen wrote:This New Scientist website article: General relativity passes test at Milky Way’s central black hole
is extremely frustrating in that it says the measurements agreed with General Relativity, but does not explain how the observations match GR (as opposed to Newtonian mechanics, I presume.)

I expected a little better from New Scientist.
I'm guessing it's not as opposed to Newtonian mechanics. I'm guessing it matches with GR as opposed to one of the hypothesized successor theories.

Which would make it hard to explain exact contents, because the result is "the measurements match GR, and not any of the fifteen other things people have guessed, or something else entirely".

At this point, high-theory physicists are desperately waiting for some sort of experiment that doesn't match their predictions, so they learn something new.

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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by Warren » 08 Jun 2017, 11:56

The "Wow!" signal was a couple of comets.
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by JD » 08 Jun 2017, 12:54

Warren wrote:The "Wow!" signal was a couple of comets.
That's slightly disappointing from a "it was aliens, though" perspective, but still pretty cool.
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by Aresen » 08 Jun 2017, 13:07

Warren wrote:The "Wow!" signal was a couple of comets.
But were they intelligent comets?
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by JD » 08 Jun 2017, 13:11

While I was reading about the Wow! signal, I came across a mention of something I hadn't heard of before: the Space Roar. In 2009, NASA's ARCADE mission sent radiometers to an altitude of 120,000 feet to do radio astronomy outside the Earth's atmosphere. To the mission planners' surprise, the level of radio noise was six times higher than anyone had predicted, and nobody has any idea where it might be coming from.
Many objects in the universe emit radio waves. In 1931, American physicist Karl Jansky first detected radio static from our own Milky Way galaxy. Similar emission from other galaxies creates a background hiss of radio noise.

The problem, notes team member Dale Fixsen of the University of Maryland at College Park, is that there don't appear to be enough radio galaxies to account for the signal ARCADE detected. "You'd have to pack them into the universe like sardines," he says. "There wouldn't be any space left between one galaxy and the next."

https://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/ne ... lloon.html
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by Warren » 08 Jun 2017, 13:33

JD wrote:While I was reading about the Wow! signal, I came across a mention of something I hadn't heard of before: the Space Roar. In 2009, NASA's ARCADE mission sent radiometers to an altitude of 120,000 feet to do radio astronomy outside the Earth's atmosphere. To the mission planners' surprise, the level of radio noise was six times higher than anyone had predicted, and nobody has any idea where it might be coming from.
Many objects in the universe emit radio waves. In 1931, American physicist Karl Jansky first detected radio static from our own Milky Way galaxy. Similar emission from other galaxies creates a background hiss of radio noise.

The problem, notes team member Dale Fixsen of the University of Maryland at College Park, is that there don't appear to be enough radio galaxies to account for the signal ARCADE detected. "You'd have to pack them into the universe like sardines," he says. "There wouldn't be any space left between one galaxy and the next."

https://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/ne ... lloon.html
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by Andrew » 08 Jun 2017, 13:40

Warren wrote:The "Wow!" signal was a couple of comets.
What about the undersea bloop?
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by JD » 08 Jun 2017, 14:00

Andrew wrote:
Warren wrote:The "Wow!" signal was a couple of comets.
What about the undersea bloop?
It was an "icequake".
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by lunchstealer » 08 Jun 2017, 15:19

Warren wrote:
JD wrote:While I was reading about the Wow! signal, I came across a mention of something I hadn't heard of before: the Space Roar. In 2009, NASA's ARCADE mission sent radiometers to an altitude of 120,000 feet to do radio astronomy outside the Earth's atmosphere. To the mission planners' surprise, the level of radio noise was six times higher than anyone had predicted, and nobody has any idea where it might be coming from.
Many objects in the universe emit radio waves. In 1931, American physicist Karl Jansky first detected radio static from our own Milky Way galaxy. Similar emission from other galaxies creates a background hiss of radio noise.

The problem, notes team member Dale Fixsen of the University of Maryland at College Park, is that there don't appear to be enough radio galaxies to account for the signal ARCADE detected. "You'd have to pack them into the universe like sardines," he says. "There wouldn't be any space left between one galaxy and the next."

https://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/ne ... lloon.html
I bet it's the sun.
One assumes that a solar signal would be directional enough that it could be identified as the source of said noise. I'm guessing that the space roar in question is omnidirectional (if that's the right term to use for an incoming signal, rather than an antenna configuration). Like the cosmic microwave background, it's a signal that's coming from everywhere at once. This is, however, speculation without even RingTFA.
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by Sandy » 08 Jun 2017, 15:46

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