Massive brawn to go with our massive brains

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Sandy
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Re: Massive brawn to go with our massive brains

Post by Sandy » 11 Jul 2016, 23:16

Ellie wrote:Is there some kind of fitness tipping point where exercise in general just becomes more enjoyable? Or is it pretty much you either like the feeling of physical exertion or you don't?
There's definitely a point, and when you get there depends a lot on your condition and how rigorous and consistent you are, that the workout--if not feeling good, exactly, feels necessary, like an itch to scratch. I got to a point where I felt better on days that I went and worked out and felt antsy if I didn't. And the exhaustion wasn't painful, it was more like it was satisfying.

This was when I was being super-religious about it and went to the gym every other day...I'd say it took 6-9 months to get there, and I'd been an inactive worm before that.

The good news is, every time I slacked off and restarted, it took less time to get back to that point where the workout didn't feel painful or exhausting.

ETA: I'd still not say I enjoyed it--the only thing I really enjoy when I'm in shape enough is a mountain hike or snorkeling in an interesting reef. For obvious reasons, those are hard to do regularly. At the moment I'm making do by walking my dog, but since we've reached the Time of the Evil Sun God, that's harder to do. Also the new pup is suddenly getting balky about walks and thinks rain will melt him. Dog, when I'm less averse to walking than you are, you have a problem.
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Re: Massive brawn to go with our massive brains

Post by nicole » 18 Jul 2016, 19:05

I wish I could remember when I started to like working out. I've been thinking about it all day since catching up with this thread. I took up running in May 2013, and prior to that I had been super inactive since I was a kid. At some point between then and now, it became really fun. One of my favorite activities, even. And no one finds this more incredible than I would have in April 2013.

Now I work out pretty much every day. It definitely is more fun now because I'm more fit; it's not necessarily easier, but you can just do more. And you're always getting fitter, so it's always getting a little more fun. Well, when it's going well at least. And it gives such a different sense of being-in-the-world.

I also remember, though, that before you feel that way, it really sucks. But by some magic of finding the right exercise and sticking to it, that will change.

Since I'm here, an update: I'm now onto week 7 of 18 of my marathon training. I feel like I'm making progress (not always the case). And I'm convinced of the value of a cutback week (my plan has one every three weeks) for the first time. (Not sure if this is a thing in other sports.)
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Painboy
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Re: Massive brawn to go with our massive brains

Post by Painboy » 18 Jul 2016, 20:16

nicole wrote:I wish I could remember when I started to like working out. I've been thinking about it all day since catching up with this thread. I took up running in May 2013, and prior to that I had been super inactive since I was a kid. At some point between then and now, it became really fun. One of my favorite activities, even. And no one finds this more incredible than I would have in April 2013.

Now I work out pretty much every day. It definitely is more fun now because I'm more fit; it's not necessarily easier, but you can just do more. And you're always getting fitter, so it's always getting a little more fun. Well, when it's going well at least. And it gives such a different sense of being-in-the-world.

I also remember, though, that before you feel that way, it really sucks. But by some magic of finding the right exercise and sticking to it, that will change.

Since I'm here, an update: I'm now onto week 7 of 18 of my marathon training. I feel like I'm making progress (not always the case). And I'm convinced of the value of a cutback week (my plan has one every three weeks) for the first time. (Not sure if this is a thing in other sports.)
There is a barrier there and when you cross it feels really good. When I was in the Army there was a point I could just throw on my running shoes and go run for 10 or so miles at the drop of a hat. I obviously couldn't run forever but I sure felt like I could. More recently I had started to get that way with lifting until I got hit by my seemingly ever-rebelling body with more health issues and the lifting got sidelined.

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Jadagul
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Re: Massive brawn to go with our massive brains

Post by Jadagul » 18 Jul 2016, 22:35

Relatedly, I'm finally getting around to learning to run. Next workout I should run a consecutive mile for the first time as an adult. Should be on a nine-minute or so pace. Then I just need to keep going until I can keep it up indefinitely.

(I explained to girl that I'm not fit if I can't keep up a decent pace run indefinitely, like for a couple hours. She responds "ooh, wanna do an iron man with me?")

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Re: Massive brawn to go with our massive brains

Post by Highway » 18 Jul 2016, 22:46

I just hear you guys talking about running and feel bad for you in 20 years. I know it's being in shape and you enjoy it, but I'd prefer to see people do something that's less impactful and still good exercise. I've got enough aches and pains from tendonitis and arthritis, and I'm only 45, and I didn't abuse my joints when I was younger the way running does.

Just remember to take care of yourselves as best as you can. You're not going to be this young ever again.
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Jadagul
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Re: Massive brawn to go with our massive brains

Post by Jadagul » 18 Jul 2016, 22:48

That's why I historically haven't run.

But if I'm late for the train I can't elliptical really fast to catch it.

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Painboy
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Re: Massive brawn to go with our massive brains

Post by Painboy » 19 Jul 2016, 14:50

Highway wrote:I just hear you guys talking about running and feel bad for you in 20 years. I know it's being in shape and you enjoy it, but I'd prefer to see people do something that's less impactful and still good exercise. I've got enough aches and pains from tendonitis and arthritis, and I'm only 45, and I didn't abuse my joints when I was younger the way running does.

Just remember to take care of yourselves as best as you can. You're not going to be this young ever again.
There's actually some evidence coming in from newer studies I've seen that running is actually good for your joints as it helps "lubricate" them, and at the very least it may not be that harmful. Where people start having issues is when they injure a knee or the like and don't rehab it fully before trying to get back out there. That can cause overcompensation by other tendons or joints that then results in problems to the runner's overall motion causing further issues.

Also there are those out there with genetic time bombs who were going to have bad knees anyway. Like an old friend of mine who has blown out his knees several times despite never doing much running.

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nicole
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Re: Massive brawn to go with our massive brains

Post by nicole » 19 Jul 2016, 15:01

Painboy wrote:
Highway wrote:I just hear you guys talking about running and feel bad for you in 20 years. I know it's being in shape and you enjoy it, but I'd prefer to see people do something that's less impactful and still good exercise. I've got enough aches and pains from tendonitis and arthritis, and I'm only 45, and I didn't abuse my joints when I was younger the way running does.

Just remember to take care of yourselves as best as you can. You're not going to be this young ever again.
There's actually some evidence coming in from newer studies I've seen that running is actually good for your joints as it helps "lubricate" them, and at the very least it may not be that harmful. Where people start having issues is when they injure a knee or the like and don't rehab it fully before trying to get back out there. That can cause overcompensation by other tendons or joints that then results in problems to the runner's overall motion causing further issues.
I've seen this as well. Considering just a few decades ago people would have told me not to run because it might jar my womb loose...meh.
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Painboy
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Re: Massive brawn to go with our massive brains

Post by Painboy » 19 Jul 2016, 15:15

nicole wrote:
Painboy wrote:
Highway wrote:I just hear you guys talking about running and feel bad for you in 20 years. I know it's being in shape and you enjoy it, but I'd prefer to see people do something that's less impactful and still good exercise. I've got enough aches and pains from tendonitis and arthritis, and I'm only 45, and I didn't abuse my joints when I was younger the way running does.

Just remember to take care of yourselves as best as you can. You're not going to be this young ever again.
There's actually some evidence coming in from newer studies I've seen that running is actually good for your joints as it helps "lubricate" them, and at the very least it may not be that harmful. Where people start having issues is when they injure a knee or the like and don't rehab it fully before trying to get back out there. That can cause overcompensation by other tendons or joints that then results in problems to the runner's overall motion causing further issues.
I've seen this as well. Considering just a few decades ago people would have told me not to run because it might jar my womb loose...meh.
Yeah I actually don't like quoting fitness studies too often as they can be wildly inaccurate as it can be difficult to control for things like genetics. However, there has been a lot of work in trying to figure out what causes soft tissue injuries and how best to rehabilitate them in pro sports. I tend to trust them a little more as there is not only significant funding behind them, but they are usually done with elite athletes who have to perform in their sport. There was a time when an ACL tear was the end of a career. Now some athletes have been able to rehab it in as little as a year by applying the information from more recent studies.

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Re: Massive brawn to go with our massive brains

Post by JasonL » 19 Jul 2016, 15:46

I've managed to drop about 5 lbs while transitioning into my crappy hips workout plan. With all the mobility stuff I'm doing pulling my hips in painful directions, I've found it difficult to maintain kettlebell workouts. I'm doing a lot of pushups, lat pulls and rows, shoulder press, negative rep leg stuff on the incline press and on steps, walking on an incline and interval elliptical. I don't have a regular routine worked out yet but at least I'm not exploding in fatness.

The therapy stuff hurts tho. Lay on back, bend one knee, pull knee toward opposite shoulder. Ugh. My body doesn't do that and it feels like someone put me in a jiu jitsu hold or something. Not muscular soreness. Not strained connective tissue. More like an arm bar locked in good, including the next day inflammation.

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Re: Massive brawn to go with our massive brains

Post by lunchstealer » 19 Jul 2016, 18:47

JasonL wrote:I've managed to drop about 5 lbs while transitioning into my crappy hips workout plan. With all the mobility stuff I'm doing pulling my hips in painful directions, I've found it difficult to maintain kettlebell workouts. I'm doing a lot of pushups, lat pulls and rows, shoulder press, negative rep leg stuff on the incline press and on steps, walking on an incline and interval elliptical. I don't have a regular routine worked out yet but at least I'm not exploding in fatness.

The therapy stuff hurts tho. Lay on back, bend one knee, pull knee toward opposite shoulder. Ugh. My body doesn't do that and it feels like someone put me in a jiu jitsu hold or something. Not muscular soreness. Not strained connective tissue. More like an arm bar locked in good, including the next day inflammation.
Yugh. Make sure you're mentioning that to your PT. If PT doesn't hurt, you need to be pushing harder, but it's gotta be the right kind of hurt. The PT will know which is which for your rehab schedule. I need to start back with my rehab exercises, because they did wonders for my overall upper-back happiness, and I've back-slid a little bit since stopping regular sessions.
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Re: Massive brawn to go with our massive brains

Post by Andrew » 19 Jul 2016, 20:48

I had my health assessment today to continue getting my insurance discount. My numbers are all still great despite my meat/egg/dairy-heavy diet, so that's a good sign. Also, their scale had me at 205, which might explain my dress shirts feeling tighter lately. I was 195 in April when I had the body composition test done at my gym, and my waist hasn't changed.
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Solitudinarian
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Re: Massive brawn to go with our massive brains

Post by Solitudinarian » 20 Jul 2016, 03:33

Painboy wrote:
Highway wrote:I just hear you guys talking about running and feel bad for you in 20 years. I know it's being in shape and you enjoy it, but I'd prefer to see people do something that's less impactful and still good exercise. I've got enough aches and pains from tendonitis and arthritis, and I'm only 45, and I didn't abuse my joints when I was younger the way running does.

Just remember to take care of yourselves as best as you can. You're not going to be this young ever again.
There's actually some evidence coming in from newer studies I've seen that running is actually good for your joints as it helps "lubricate" them, and at the very least it may not be that harmful. Where people start having issues is when they injure a knee or the like and don't rehab it fully before trying to get back out there. That can cause overcompensation by other tendons or joints that then results in problems to the runner's overall motion causing further issues.

Also there are those out there with genetic time bombs who were going to have bad knees anyway. Like an old friend of mine who has blown out his knees several times despite never doing much running.
My understanding is that running is not bad for you per se, but excessive mileage is. I've reduced my running to 12-13 miles per week (if we include rucking) and my joints have thanked me for it.
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Painboy
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Re: Massive brawn to go with our massive brains

Post by Painboy » 20 Jul 2016, 11:18

Solitudinarian wrote:
Painboy wrote:
Highway wrote:I just hear you guys talking about running and feel bad for you in 20 years. I know it's being in shape and you enjoy it, but I'd prefer to see people do something that's less impactful and still good exercise. I've got enough aches and pains from tendonitis and arthritis, and I'm only 45, and I didn't abuse my joints when I was younger the way running does.

Just remember to take care of yourselves as best as you can. You're not going to be this young ever again.
There's actually some evidence coming in from newer studies I've seen that running is actually good for your joints as it helps "lubricate" them, and at the very least it may not be that harmful. Where people start having issues is when they injure a knee or the like and don't rehab it fully before trying to get back out there. That can cause overcompensation by other tendons or joints that then results in problems to the runner's overall motion causing further issues.

Also there are those out there with genetic time bombs who were going to have bad knees anyway. Like an old friend of mine who has blown out his knees several times despite never doing much running.
My understanding is that running is not bad for you per se, but excessive mileage is. I've reduced my running to 12-13 miles per week (if we include rucking) and my joints have thanked me for it.
Certainly. Too much of anything is ultimately bad for you.

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Painboy
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Re: Massive brawn to go with our massive brains

Post by Painboy » 20 Jul 2016, 11:43

Jadagul wrote:Relatedly, I'm finally getting around to learning to run. Next workout I should run a consecutive mile for the first time as an adult. Should be on a nine-minute or so pace. Then I just need to keep going until I can keep it up indefinitely.

(I explained to girl that I'm not fit if I can't keep up a decent pace run indefinitely, like for a couple hours. She responds "ooh, wanna do an iron man with me?")
I don't want to sound like a fitness guru but this is something I have some personal experience dealing with when.

I don't know your height and weight but you should probably try to pace yourself for 8-8 1/2 minute miles. 9 minute miles are almost counter productive as it's likely to keep that speed you are not stretching out your stride very much. Taking shorter choppy steps takes almost the same amount of energy but covers little distance in return. Even semi-experienced runners usually find a 9 minute pace to be uncomfortable to maintain. Not sure about the science of it but it also feels like it helps "open up" your lungs as well.

I struggled with this early in the Army as I had no idea there were actual techniques to running. My times were terrible because I shuffled my feet thinking I was minimizing my energy loss. It wasn't until I got to my unit after Basic that I was taught some better stuff. In my unit we were regularly doing 7 minute miles on long runs. It took a few weeks to get it down (running in formation helps since you have someone to pace off of) but once that line was crossed I not only performed better but I felt much better when I ran.

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Re: Massive brawn to go with our massive brains

Post by tr0g » 20 Jul 2016, 11:50

Painboy wrote:
Jadagul wrote:Relatedly, I'm finally getting around to learning to run. Next workout I should run a consecutive mile for the first time as an adult. Should be on a nine-minute or so pace. Then I just need to keep going until I can keep it up indefinitely.

(I explained to girl that I'm not fit if I can't keep up a decent pace run indefinitely, like for a couple hours. She responds "ooh, wanna do an iron man with me?")
I don't want to sound like a fitness guru but this is something I have some personal experience dealing with when.

I don't know your height and weight but you should probably try to pace yourself for 8-8 1/2 minute miles. 9 minute miles are almost counter productive as it's likely to keep that speed you are not stretching out your stride very much. Taking shorter choppy steps takes almost the same amount of energy but covers little distance in return. Even semi-experienced runners usually find a 9 minute pace to be uncomfortable to maintain. Not sure about the science of it but it also feels like it helps "open up" your lungs as well.

I struggled with this early in the Army as I had no idea there were actual techniques to running. My times were terrible because I shuffled my feet thinking I was minimizing my energy loss. It wasn't until I got to my unit after Basic that I was taught some better stuff. In my unit we were regularly doing 7 minute miles on long runs. It took a few weeks to get it down (running in formation helps since you have someone to pace off of) but once that line was crossed I not only performed better but I felt much better when I ran.
Fucking jump school. They put the midgets at the front of the formation and they took little tiny baby steps on an 8 minute pace. I was all the way at the back and the instructors were riding us to keep the formation closed up so we couldn't stretch out. I had the worst shin splints of my life after 3 weeks of that shit.
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nicole
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Re: Massive brawn to go with our massive brains

Post by nicole » 20 Jul 2016, 11:57

All the running advice I've seen is to try to target 170 strides per minute and not to overstride.

As far as speed, that's a whole other question. I run based on HR, mostly very slowly with a pretty low HR. But if you're not trying to do endurance running that might be different.
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lunchstealer
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Re: Massive brawn to go with our massive brains

Post by lunchstealer » 20 Jul 2016, 12:01

Painboy wrote:
Solitudinarian wrote:
Painboy wrote:
Highway wrote:I just hear you guys talking about running and feel bad for you in 20 years. I know it's being in shape and you enjoy it, but I'd prefer to see people do something that's less impactful and still good exercise. I've got enough aches and pains from tendonitis and arthritis, and I'm only 45, and I didn't abuse my joints when I was younger the way running does.

Just remember to take care of yourselves as best as you can. You're not going to be this young ever again.
There's actually some evidence coming in from newer studies I've seen that running is actually good for your joints as it helps "lubricate" them, and at the very least it may not be that harmful. Where people start having issues is when they injure a knee or the like and don't rehab it fully before trying to get back out there. That can cause overcompensation by other tendons or joints that then results in problems to the runner's overall motion causing further issues.

Also there are those out there with genetic time bombs who were going to have bad knees anyway. Like an old friend of mine who has blown out his knees several times despite never doing much running.
My understanding is that running is not bad for you per se, but excessive mileage is. I've reduced my running to 12-13 miles per week (if we include rucking) and my joints have thanked me for it.
Certainly. Too much of anything is ultimately bad for you.
Especially moderation.
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Ellie
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Re: Massive brawn to go with our massive brains

Post by Ellie » 20 Jul 2016, 13:14

Thanks for the input, guys. It's nice to know there's (probably) a light at the end of the tunnel. I was never super athletic, but I did run cross-country and track (small enough high school where literally anyone could be on the team). Basically, I'd get my ass kicked if I tried anything competitive but was fit enough that day-to-day stuff never slowed me down.

But where I am now, starting what feels like from scratch, suuuuuuucks. You can't DO anything because you get worn out so fast. So your progress is crazy slow because you have nothing to build momentum on. Oh well, just gotta keep grinding.
I should have listened to Warren. He was right again as usual.

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Painboy
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Re: Massive brawn to go with our massive brains

Post by Painboy » 20 Jul 2016, 14:19

tr0g wrote:
Painboy wrote:
Jadagul wrote:Relatedly, I'm finally getting around to learning to run. Next workout I should run a consecutive mile for the first time as an adult. Should be on a nine-minute or so pace. Then I just need to keep going until I can keep it up indefinitely.

(I explained to girl that I'm not fit if I can't keep up a decent pace run indefinitely, like for a couple hours. She responds "ooh, wanna do an iron man with me?")
I don't want to sound like a fitness guru but this is something I have some personal experience dealing with when.

I don't know your height and weight but you should probably try to pace yourself for 8-8 1/2 minute miles. 9 minute miles are almost counter productive as it's likely to keep that speed you are not stretching out your stride very much. Taking shorter choppy steps takes almost the same amount of energy but covers little distance in return. Even semi-experienced runners usually find a 9 minute pace to be uncomfortable to maintain. Not sure about the science of it but it also feels like it helps "open up" your lungs as well.

I struggled with this early in the Army as I had no idea there were actual techniques to running. My times were terrible because I shuffled my feet thinking I was minimizing my energy loss. It wasn't until I got to my unit after Basic that I was taught some better stuff. In my unit we were regularly doing 7 minute miles on long runs. It took a few weeks to get it down (running in formation helps since you have someone to pace off of) but once that line was crossed I not only performed better but I felt much better when I ran.
Fucking jump school. They put the midgets at the front of the formation and they took little tiny baby steps on an 8 minute pace. I was all the way at the back and the instructors were riding us to keep the formation closed up so we couldn't stretch out. I had the worst shin splints of my life after 3 weeks of that shit.
Ha! That was my exact experience as well. Even as poor a runner as I was at the time my shins took a beating.

The absolute worst was the division run they made us do in my first unit. Every desk jockey and REMF in the division had to run 3 miles. It felt like we were walking most of it. The only thing that made up for it was making fun of all the people who fell out even at that pace. God we were assholes. :P

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Jadagul
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Re: Massive brawn to go with our massive brains

Post by Jadagul » 20 Jul 2016, 17:25

Painboy wrote:
Jadagul wrote:Relatedly, I'm finally getting around to learning to run. Next workout I should run a consecutive mile for the first time as an adult. Should be on a nine-minute or so pace. Then I just need to keep going until I can keep it up indefinitely.

(I explained to girl that I'm not fit if I can't keep up a decent pace run indefinitely, like for a couple hours. She responds "ooh, wanna do an iron man with me?")
I don't want to sound like a fitness guru but this is something I have some personal experience dealing with when.

I don't know your height and weight but you should probably try to pace yourself for 8-8 1/2 minute miles. 9 minute miles are almost counter productive as it's likely to keep that speed you are not stretching out your stride very much. Taking shorter choppy steps takes almost the same amount of energy but covers little distance in return. Even semi-experienced runners usually find a 9 minute pace to be uncomfortable to maintain. Not sure about the science of it but it also feels like it helps "open up" your lungs as well.

I struggled with this early in the Army as I had no idea there were actual techniques to running. My times were terrible because I shuffled my feet thinking I was minimizing my energy loss. It wasn't until I got to my unit after Basic that I was taught some better stuff. In my unit we were regularly doing 7 minute miles on long runs. It took a few weeks to get it down (running in formation helps since you have someone to pace off of) but once that line was crossed I not only performed better but I felt much better when I ran.
Well, right now my goal is just to run a mile at all. The fight is to make myself run slower than I naturally want to. (Probably unsurprisingly, my personality tends to be "dump all my energy into whatever I'm doing right now!" which isn't actually optimal for endurance activities).

Based on what I've read, a more shuffly step reduces impact and is better for your joints, as long as you're actually shuffling. But I have read conflicting accounts of this--some people encourage you to open up your stride and some people encourage exactly the opposite. As I get able to run for more than five minutes at a stretch I'll experiment, and it's probably time to do some more research.

But also relevant is that my stride is naturally far, far more open than most people's because of my dance background. My normal walking stride gets my knees probably two feet apart at the foot-strike.

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Painboy
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Re: Massive brawn to go with our massive brains

Post by Painboy » 20 Jul 2016, 18:53

Jadagul wrote:
Painboy wrote:
Jadagul wrote:Relatedly, I'm finally getting around to learning to run. Next workout I should run a consecutive mile for the first time as an adult. Should be on a nine-minute or so pace. Then I just need to keep going until I can keep it up indefinitely.

(I explained to girl that I'm not fit if I can't keep up a decent pace run indefinitely, like for a couple hours. She responds "ooh, wanna do an iron man with me?")
I don't want to sound like a fitness guru but this is something I have some personal experience dealing with when.

I don't know your height and weight but you should probably try to pace yourself for 8-8 1/2 minute miles. 9 minute miles are almost counter productive as it's likely to keep that speed you are not stretching out your stride very much. Taking shorter choppy steps takes almost the same amount of energy but covers little distance in return. Even semi-experienced runners usually find a 9 minute pace to be uncomfortable to maintain. Not sure about the science of it but it also feels like it helps "open up" your lungs as well.

I struggled with this early in the Army as I had no idea there were actual techniques to running. My times were terrible because I shuffled my feet thinking I was minimizing my energy loss. It wasn't until I got to my unit after Basic that I was taught some better stuff. In my unit we were regularly doing 7 minute miles on long runs. It took a few weeks to get it down (running in formation helps since you have someone to pace off of) but once that line was crossed I not only performed better but I felt much better when I ran.
Well, right now my goal is just to run a mile at all. The fight is to make myself run slower than I naturally want to. (Probably unsurprisingly, my personality tends to be "dump all my energy into whatever I'm doing right now!" which isn't actually optimal for endurance activities).

Based on what I've read, a more shuffly step reduces impact and is better for your joints, as long as you're actually shuffling. But I have read conflicting accounts of this--some people encourage you to open up your stride and some people encourage exactly the opposite. As I get able to run for more than five minutes at a stretch I'll experiment, and it's probably time to do some more research.

But also relevant is that my stride is naturally far, far more open than most people's because of my dance background. My normal walking stride gets my knees probably two feet apart at the foot-strike.
There's always conflicting advice in fitness unfortunately. It's just the problem with accurately measuring what is actually going on inside the body.

What goes first when you are running? Lungs or legs?

If it's your lungs I would encourage opening up your stride and go at a higher pace until you start heaving hard then slow way down until you get your air back. Then start running faster again until your breathing hard again and slow back down. Repeat until results are achieved. This is kind of a one man indian run. We used to do them in the military. You would have a line of people running at a slower pace and the last person would have to run from the back all the way to the front, and then next guy would run to the front and so on. That exercise helped tremendously with my wind and as well as recovering it quickly. Once you get your wind up you can start evening out the pace more and find out what feels the most comfortable for you.

If it's your legs getting tired first then it's just going to take some time for them to build up that muscle fiber. This should improve pretty quickly though if you keep at it. The main thing to guard against is shin splints as they can slow or even stop your development if they get too painful. So try to run on flat surfaces initially where your foot isn't hitting the ground at odd angles.

ETA: Oh and make sure you hydrate. Before and after. A lot of people aren't used to drinking that much liquid in a day and don't drink enough normally to stay hydrated. As a dancer I would think you would already know this but you never know.

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Jadagul
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Re: Massive brawn to go with our massive brains

Post by Jadagul » 20 Jul 2016, 22:06

I hydrate like crazy, it's a running joke with me and my friends. At a decent length workout I drink like half a gallon of water.

I'm running on a track, which makes a bunch of things easier.

Lungs go first, I think, but they go way faster running than other things, and I can feel it in my legs, so I think it's both. Right now everything is staying light because it's new to me But first day I ran one lap in 1:45 and was almost dead at the end. Now I'm running three laps at a 2:15 per lap pace, and feel less dead at the end, which I think is progress.

But yeah, hoping I can open my stride up again soon. I might try varying the pace and see if that helps. But I kinda want to hit a full mile beore I start doing anything weird.

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Andrew
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Re: Massive brawn to go with our massive brains

Post by Andrew » 24 Oct 2016, 11:09

Apparently, my squat form is in need of serious revision. Ugh.
We live in the fucked age. Get used to it. - dhex

holy shit there will never be an end until the sweet release of death (as dictated by the death panels, natch) - lunch

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nicole
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Re: Massive brawn to go with our massive brains

Post by nicole » 03 Nov 2016, 13:55

This is all pretty ridiculous but made me want to join Equinox http://www.gq.com/story/inside-equinox-gym-secret-club
"Fucking qualia." -Hugh Akston

"Privilege is having large phones fit into the garments that society expects you to wear." -Dangerman

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