Page 34 of 34

Re: DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Posted: 06 Apr 2020, 15:22
by thoreau
Evil Fiziks Types have verified the inverse square law of gravity down to 50 microns (5000 nanometers).

https://arstechnica.com/science/2020/04 ... passes/#p3

This is the sort of precision experimental work that, no joke, makes America great. As long as we have a scientific community capable of this kind of precision, we can do some freakin' hard science and engineering.

Re: DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Posted: 06 Apr 2020, 18:28
by Kolohe
The technical achievement of the experimental apparatus is impressive, but isn't 50 microns quite large if we're trying to hash out the differences and nuances of the 4 different main forces?

Re: DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Posted: 06 Apr 2020, 18:49
by thoreau
Kolohe wrote: 06 Apr 2020, 18:28 The technical achievement of the experimental apparatus is impressive, but isn't 50 microns quite large if we're trying to hash out the differences and nuances of the 4 different main forces?
It's quite large by string theory standards, but string theory isn't science.

More seriously, while we don't have any well-motivated theories for gravity deviating from Newtonian (or relativistic) predictions at a scale of 50 microns, the job of an experimentalist is to test our understanding of the universe as well as they can, not as well as the theorists want them to. This is better than anyone has done before, so it's an achievement.

Also, people are working towards experiments that involve gravitational interactions between entangled particles. (Yes, really.) Such experiments would be crucial for settling the question of whether quantized gravity is even a thing worth studying. Studying gravity on 50 micron length scales actually does matter for those experiments.

Re: DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Posted: 06 Apr 2020, 19:00
by Kolohe
Fair enough. Frankly, I didn't have a feel for how big 50 microns was till looking it up, and saw 'about the width of a human hair'. Which then made me think 'well I can see that, so that seems very big for tiny fiziks'

Re: DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Posted: 21 Apr 2020, 09:40
by JD
Fiziks Iz weird: particles traveling through the vacuum of space can emit flashes of gamma radiation. How? Well, charged particles traveling faster than the speed of light in a medium cause Cherenkov emission. But in the vacuum of space? It turns out that virtual particles interacting with the extremely strong electromagnetic fields around neutron stars can create a "medium" that slows down the local velocity of light. High-velocity charged particles enter and emit gamma radiation as Cherenkov emission. This may explain some heretofore unexplained sources of gamma radiation.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2 ... 104247.htm

Re: DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Posted: 29 Apr 2020, 15:05
by Aresen

Re: DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Posted: 15 Jul 2020, 17:07
by thoreau
Blood transfusions from physically fit mice help fat sedentary mice become energetic and alert.

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-02068-z

I shall be the supervillain who draws his powers from Crossfit customers.