DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

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dbcooper
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DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Post by dbcooper » 11 Dec 2011, 20:39

For the discussion of science, technology, engineering, and medical technology.

Pay tribute to Warren and Warrenism at the door. Two drink minimum. Humanities majors welcomed but good faith required.
Last edited by dbcooper on 11 Dec 2011, 20:46, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Post by dbcooper » 11 Dec 2011, 20:44

SuVolta claims to have the manufacturing tech to revitalise (cheap) planar CMOS CPU technology. One must note that they have only demonstrated their elegant materials science solution (get it) at 65nm. Which is one suspiciously relevant node above even 45nm features. (Have not read their pitch, but high-K materials were a huge step to go from 65 to 45nm. Shouldn't effect them but why demonstrate at such a high feature size?)

IEEE Spectrum discussion:

http://spectrum.ieee.org/semiconductors ... nsistors/0
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Re: DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Post by Aresen » 13 Dec 2011, 23:43

My contribution to technical progress this year was to finally get rid of my IBM PS2, which had been languishing in a closet for 16 years.
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Re: DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Post by JD » 14 Dec 2011, 10:16

Aresen wrote:My contribution to technical progress this year was to finally get rid of my IBM PS2, which had been languishing in a closet for 16 years.
Damn, a PS/2?! For sixteen years?!! I salute your packrattitude, sir.

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Re: DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Post by D.A. Ridgely » 14 Dec 2011, 10:22

JD wrote:
Aresen wrote:My contribution to technical progress this year was to finally get rid of my IBM PS2, which had been languishing in a closet for 16 years.
Damn, a PS/2?! For sixteen years?!! I salute your packrattitude, sir.
Phooey! I still have my Apple II + in the attic somewhere. I'm waiting for it to achieve antique status.

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Re: DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Post by tr0g » 14 Dec 2011, 10:43

Aresen wrote:My contribution to technical progress this year was to finally get rid of my IBM PS2, which had been languishing in a closet for 16 years.
Last year I threw away something like 10 old wintel boxes, going back to somewhere around 1995. And I think at least 8 CRT monitors, one of which was an IBM green monochrome. Plus 2 macs.

I kept the VIC-20, though, and the wife insisted on keeping her Mac+.
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Re: DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Post by lunchstealer » 14 Dec 2011, 10:45

D.A. Ridgely wrote:
JD wrote:
Aresen wrote:My contribution to technical progress this year was to finally get rid of my IBM PS2, which had been languishing in a closet for 16 years.
Damn, a PS/2?! For sixteen years?!! I salute your packrattitude, sir.
Phooey! I still have my Apple II + in the attic somewhere. I'm waiting for it to achieve antique status.
You're waiting for 2002?
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Re: DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Post by D.A. Ridgely » 14 Dec 2011, 10:49

lunchstealer wrote:
D.A. Ridgely wrote:
JD wrote:
Aresen wrote:My contribution to technical progress this year was to finally get rid of my IBM PS2, which had been languishing in a closet for 16 years.
Damn, a PS/2?! For sixteen years?!! I salute your packrattitude, sir.
Phooey! I still have my Apple II + in the attic somewhere. I'm waiting for it to achieve antique status.
You're waiting for 2002?
I should have been more precise. I'm waiting for it to achieve valuable antique status. Yes, I know, frost in Hades and all that.


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Re: DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Post by Hugh Akston » 16 Dec 2011, 18:06

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Re: DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Post by thoreau » 20 Dec 2011, 13:28

Earth-sized planets found:

http://arstechnica.com/science/news/201 ... e-star.ars

Given their proximity to the star they should be too warm to support life, but that's what people said about Barstow, and yet there's life. (Whether it's intelligent life is another story.)
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Re: DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Post by Highway » 20 Dec 2011, 13:56

Gonna be nitpicky about that article, specifically the picture caption.
The two newly found exoplanets wouldn't look out of place in our own solar system.
Well duh. Our own solar system has blue, red, green, yellow, and gray planets. It's got planets of all sorts of sizes and masses, from 5% of the Earth's mass to 300 times the earth's mass. What planet WOULDN'T fit in to our solar system?
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Re: DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Post by D.A. Ridgely » 20 Dec 2011, 14:12

Highway wrote:Gonna be nitpicky about that article, specifically the picture caption.
The two newly found exoplanets wouldn't look out of place in our own solar system.
Well duh. Our own solar system has blue, red, green, yellow, and gray planets. It's got planets of all sorts of sizes and masses, from 5% of the Earth's mass to 300 times the earth's mass. What planet WOULDN'T fit in to our solar system?
Image

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Re: DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Post by Mo » 20 Dec 2011, 14:59

Highway wrote:Well duh. Our own solar system has blue, red, green, yellow, and gray planets. It's got planets of all sorts of sizes and masses, from 5% of the Earth's mass to 300 times the earth's mass. What planet WOULDN'T fit in to our solar system?
Obviously, our solar system has a very good diversity coordinator.
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Re: DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Post by D.A. Ridgely » 20 Dec 2011, 16:33

Mo wrote:
Highway wrote:Well duh. Our own solar system has blue, red, green, yellow, and gray planets. It's got planets of all sorts of sizes and masses, from 5% of the Earth's mass to 300 times the earth's mass. What planet WOULDN'T fit in to our solar system?
Obviously, our solar system has a very good diversity coordinator.
And we're expecting an EEO complaint from Pluto any day.

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Re: DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Post by JasonL » 20 Dec 2011, 16:45

Is 3D printing one of the most important things being worked on, or is it kind of neat but ultimately a gimmick? I was thinking about putting questions like this into a Next Big Thing? thread, but this is conceptually awfully close.

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Re: DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Post by thoreau » 20 Dec 2011, 16:53

JasonL wrote:Is 3D printing one of the most important things being worked on, or is it kind of neat but ultimately a gimmick? I was thinking about putting questions like this into a Next Big Thing? thread, but this is conceptually awfully close.
I guess I wonder whether 3D printing is good for anything other than cheap plastic crap. Integrating plastics with other materials or devices requires more than just a printer. Maybe that too can be automated, but it would still increase the complexity. In that case we're really talking about making professional manufacturing cheaper and easier for small companies, rather than the "You can have anything at any time in your home!" vision of the future. Um, yeah, great to know that I can have cheap plastic crap anytime I want, but I already living walking distance from a $0.99 store and a Target.

OTOH, if this makes the manufacturing of cheap plastic crap cheap enough, maybe those jobs will finally come home from China, to save on shipping costs.
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Re: DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Post by JasonL » 20 Dec 2011, 17:07

thoreau wrote:
JasonL wrote:Is 3D printing one of the most important things being worked on, or is it kind of neat but ultimately a gimmick? I was thinking about putting questions like this into a Next Big Thing? thread, but this is conceptually awfully close.
I guess I wonder whether 3D printing is good for anything other than cheap plastic crap. Integrating plastics with other materials or devices requires more than just a printer. Maybe that too can be automated, but it would still increase the complexity. In that case we're really talking about making professional manufacturing cheaper and easier for small companies, rather than the "You can have anything at any time in your home!" vision of the future. Um, yeah, great to know that I can have cheap plastic crap anytime I want, but I already living walking distance from a $0.99 store and a Target.

OTOH, if this makes the manufacturing of cheap plastic crap cheap enough, maybe those jobs will finally come home from China, to save on shipping costs.
My thoughts exactly. Is there a base of technology that could eventually incorporate other materials, or is it just for making 3d plastic crap?

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Re: DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Post by dbcooper » 20 Dec 2011, 17:28

JasonL wrote:
thoreau wrote:
JasonL wrote:Is 3D printing one of the most important things being worked on, or is it kind of neat but ultimately a gimmick? I was thinking about putting questions like this into a Next Big Thing? thread, but this is conceptually awfully close.
I guess I wonder whether 3D printing is good for anything other than cheap plastic crap. Integrating plastics with other materials or devices requires more than just a printer. Maybe that too can be automated, but it would still increase the complexity. In that case we're really talking about making professional manufacturing cheaper and easier for small companies, rather than the "You can have anything at any time in your home!" vision of the future. Um, yeah, great to know that I can have cheap plastic crap anytime I want, but I already living walking distance from a $0.99 store and a Target.

OTOH, if this makes the manufacturing of cheap plastic crap cheap enough, maybe those jobs will finally come home from China, to save on shipping costs.
My thoughts exactly. Is there a base of technology that could eventually incorporate other materials, or is it just for making 3d plastic crap?
There are various additive and subtractive rapid prototyping techniques. "3D printing" generally refers to additive freeform fabrication techniques such as fused deposition modelling or selective laser sintering (SLS). Most techniques are limited to polymers, but SLS can make usable metal parts and sand based molds for casting.

As a manufacturing technology 3D printing is greatly over hyped. However, it and other rapid prototyping techniques (e.g. CNC maching) are very useful for product development.

ETA: custom medical/dental implant manufacturing is an interesting application. Much of this is already done with CNC systems.
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Re: DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Post by Highway » 20 Dec 2011, 17:45

This article in the Economist I read in the past week that 3D printing actually had benefits due to the more 'organic' nature of its forms. There are quite a few examples given.

I think that there's definitely the possibility for 3D printing to at least partially bridge a gap between custom crafted and mass market, and to open up more customers to a custom crafted style of item. Maybe I'm thinking of it too much in the old IBM "We see a maximum number of about 50 computers for the whole world" kind of thing, but I think that it would be more of a middling kind of thing. You'd still get your cheap plastic crap from Walmart or Target or the grocery store, but say your artificial leg broke, or you wanted a special lamp for your house, or your mechanic needed a replacement mounting bracket. It could be a lot easier to source it from a local guy who prints it based on the spec than to get the item. It could be a terrific boon for auto repair, for instance, to not have so much inventory of just parts.

I think it's something that we'll just have to see how it works out.
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Re: DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Post by dbcooper » 20 Dec 2011, 17:54

In case anyone is interested, this is a company that offers rapid prototyping/tooling/manufacturing services that include various "3D printing" techniques (including medical implants applications).

http://www.crdm.co.uk/

EOS is one of the big SLS companies.

http://www.eos.info/index.php?L=1
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Re: DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Post by thoreau » 20 Dec 2011, 18:00

Highway wrote:This article in the Economist I read in the past week that 3D printing actually had benefits due to the more 'organic' nature of its forms. There are quite a few examples given.

I think that there's definitely the possibility for 3D printing to at least partially bridge a gap between custom crafted and mass market, and to open up more customers to a custom crafted style of item. Maybe I'm thinking of it too much in the old IBM "We see a maximum number of about 50 computers for the whole world" kind of thing, but I think that it would be more of a middling kind of thing. You'd still get your cheap plastic crap from Walmart or Target or the grocery store, but say your artificial leg broke, or you wanted a special lamp for your house, or your mechanic needed a replacement mounting bracket. It could be a lot easier to source it from a local guy who prints it based on the spec than to get the item. It could be a terrific boon for auto repair, for instance, to not have so much inventory of just parts.

I think it's something that we'll just have to see how it works out.
That's a valid point. There's a lot of stuff that becomes useless if one cheap plastic piece breaks. In the case of a car, they stock replacement parts. In the case of cheaper consumer goods, it is less of a hassle to go buy another one. If, say, a piece of plastic crap on my rollerblades, or my coffee maker, could be replaced for $5 on a printer, that's a win.
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Re: DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Post by Kolohe » 20 Dec 2011, 19:23

Good: When the 3D printer can make Earl Grey Tea.

Bad: When the 3D printer can make other 3D printers.
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Re: DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Post by tr0g » 20 Dec 2011, 20:23

Kolohe wrote:Good: When the 3D printer can make Earl Grey Tea.

Bad: When the 3D printer can make other 3D printers.
There's an Open Source Hardware project called RepRap that is trying to design and build a rapid prototyping machine capable of self-replication. It's pretty far along, so it'll happen sooner rather than later.
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Re: DB's absolutely amazing sci/tech thread

Post by Kolohe » 20 Dec 2011, 20:33

tr0g wrote:
Kolohe wrote:Good: When the 3D printer can make Earl Grey Tea.

Bad: When the 3D printer can make other 3D printers.
There's an Open Source Hardware project called RepRap that is trying to design and build a rapid prototyping machine capable of self-replication. It's pretty far along, so it'll happen sooner rather than later.
Well, ok, just as long as they're not building flying killer robots...
Though the U.S. military hasn't seen widespread use of 3D printers as of yet, designers in the United Kingdom used the technology to build a small drone aircraft capable of reaching speeds up to 100 miles per hour, according to the source
http://www.caddedge.com/3d-printing-and ... technology

Alrighty then.
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