You Learn Something New Every Day

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D.A. Ridgely
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by D.A. Ridgely »

Warren wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 21:44
D.A. Ridgely wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 21:27
Warren wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 20:22
lunchstealer wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 19:48
Warren wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 19:44
lunchstealer wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 15:36 there are some things that are hard wired as integers that become a PITA as floating point numbers
Example?
Elevation values, sometimes bin dimensions in a raster. Usually it's in RF engineering software that was written by RF engineers rather than GIS or remote sensing types.
RF = Radio Frequency to me. What does it mean to you? Also GIS pls.
Geographic Information Systems, of course! Hell, any liberal arts major could have told you that!
Your average liberal arts major thinks 'Geographic Information System' is the search engine for nationalgeographic.com
Your average liberal arts major knows how to look up answers to questions your average engineer should already have known.
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Warren
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Warren »

D.A. Ridgely wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 21:55
Warren wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 21:44
D.A. Ridgely wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 21:27
Warren wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 20:22
lunchstealer wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 19:48
Warren wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 19:44

Example?
Elevation values, sometimes bin dimensions in a raster. Usually it's in RF engineering software that was written by RF engineers rather than GIS or remote sensing types.
RF = Radio Frequency to me. What does it mean to you? Also GIS pls.
Geographic Information Systems, of course! Hell, any liberal arts major could have told you that!
Your average liberal arts major thinks 'Geographic Information System' is the search engine for nationalgeographic.com
Your average liberal arts major knows how to look up answers to questions your average engineer should already have known.
Your idea of what an engineer should know and tree fiddy will by you a cup of coffee.
Nobody, men included, wants a world where men treat women with the same respect they show to other men. - thoreau
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D.A. Ridgely
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by D.A. Ridgely »

Warren wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 22:16
D.A. Ridgely wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 21:55
Warren wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 21:44
D.A. Ridgely wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 21:27
Warren wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 20:22
lunchstealer wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 19:48

Elevation values, sometimes bin dimensions in a raster. Usually it's in RF engineering software that was written by RF engineers rather than GIS or remote sensing types.
RF = Radio Frequency to me. What does it mean to you? Also GIS pls.
Geographic Information Systems, of course! Hell, any liberal arts major could have told you that!
Your average liberal arts major thinks 'Geographic Information System' is the search engine for nationalgeographic.com
Your average liberal arts major knows how to look up answers to questions your average engineer should already have known.
Your idea of what an engineer should know and tree fiddy will by you a cup of coffee.
I know you misspelled three fifty intentionally, but "by"?
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Warren
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Warren »

D.A. Ridgely wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 22:19
Warren wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 22:16
D.A. Ridgely wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 21:55
Warren wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 21:44
D.A. Ridgely wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 21:27
Warren wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 20:22

RF = Radio Frequency to me. What does it mean to you? Also GIS pls.
Geographic Information Systems, of course! Hell, any liberal arts major could have told you that!
Your average liberal arts major thinks 'Geographic Information System' is the search engine for nationalgeographic.com
Your average liberal arts major knows how to look up answers to questions your average engineer should already have known.
Your idea of what an engineer should know and tree fiddy will by you a cup of coffee.
I know you misspelled three fifty intentionally, but "by"?
Bye
Nobody, men included, wants a world where men treat women with the same respect they show to other men. - thoreau
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lunchstealer
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by lunchstealer »

Warren wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 20:22
lunchstealer wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 19:48
Warren wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 19:44
lunchstealer wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 15:36 there are some things that are hard wired as integers that become a PITA as floating point numbers
Example?
Elevation values, sometimes bin dimensions in a raster. Usually it's in RF engineering software that was written by RF engineers rather than GIS or remote sensing types.
RF = Radio Frequency to me. What does it mean to you? Also GIS pls.
What DAR said. Our customers use our geographic data products, like terrain and landcover models and sometimes building models to simulate and plan radio access networks - mostly mobile telco but sometimes smart meter or point-to-point or point-to-multipoint microwave networks.
"Dude she's the Purdue Pharma of the black pill." - JasonL

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Warren
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Warren »

lunchstealer wrote: 02 Jul 2020, 01:52
Warren wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 20:22
lunchstealer wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 19:48
Warren wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 19:44
lunchstealer wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 15:36 there are some things that are hard wired as integers that become a PITA as floating point numbers
Example?
Elevation values, sometimes bin dimensions in a raster. Usually it's in RF engineering software that was written by RF engineers rather than GIS or remote sensing types.
RF = Radio Frequency to me. What does it mean to you? Also GIS pls.
What DAR said. Our customers use our geographic data products, like terrain and landcover models and sometimes building models to simulate and plan radio access networks - mostly mobile telco but sometimes smart meter or point-to-point or point-to-multipoint microwave networks.
Thanks (But that's not really what DAR said.)
Nobody, men included, wants a world where men treat women with the same respect they show to other men. - thoreau
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Number 6
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Number 6 »

lunchstealer wrote: 02 Jul 2020, 01:52
Warren wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 20:22
lunchstealer wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 19:48
Warren wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 19:44
lunchstealer wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 15:36 there are some things that are hard wired as integers that become a PITA as floating point numbers
Example?
Elevation values, sometimes bin dimensions in a raster. Usually it's in RF engineering software that was written by RF engineers rather than GIS or remote sensing types.
RF = Radio Frequency to me. What does it mean to you? Also GIS pls.
What DAR said. Our customers use our geographic data products, like terrain and landcover models and sometimes building models to simulate and plan radio access networks - mostly mobile telco but sometimes smart meter or point-to-point or point-to-multipoint microwave networks.
Interesting. Back in the stone age, when I worked for a wireless ISP, we made use of similar modeling software to figure out where to place antennae. I'm afraid I don't remember the name of of the program, though.
" i discovered you eat dog dicks out of a bowl marked "dog dicks" because you're too stupid to remember where you left your bowl of dog dicks."-dhex, of course.
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lunchstealer
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by lunchstealer »

Number 6 wrote: 02 Jul 2020, 13:57
lunchstealer wrote: 02 Jul 2020, 01:52
Warren wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 20:22
lunchstealer wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 19:48
Warren wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 19:44
lunchstealer wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 15:36 there are some things that are hard wired as integers that become a PITA as floating point numbers
Example?
Elevation values, sometimes bin dimensions in a raster. Usually it's in RF engineering software that was written by RF engineers rather than GIS or remote sensing types.
RF = Radio Frequency to me. What does it mean to you? Also GIS pls.
What DAR said. Our customers use our geographic data products, like terrain and landcover models and sometimes building models to simulate and plan radio access networks - mostly mobile telco but sometimes smart meter or point-to-point or point-to-multipoint microwave networks.
Interesting. Back in the stone age, when I worked for a wireless ISP, we made use of similar modeling software to figure out where to place antennae. I'm afraid I don't remember the name of of the program, though.
EDX was one of the cheapest, and probably got used in a lot of ISPs, that or Pathloss.
"Dude she's the Purdue Pharma of the black pill." - JasonL

"This thread is like a dog park where everyone lets their preconceptions and biases run around and sniff each others butts." - Hugh Akston

"That's just tokenism with extra steps." - Jake
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lunchstealer
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by lunchstealer »

Warren wrote: 02 Jul 2020, 12:31
lunchstealer wrote: 02 Jul 2020, 01:52
Warren wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 20:22
lunchstealer wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 19:48
Warren wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 19:44
lunchstealer wrote: 01 Jul 2020, 15:36 there are some things that are hard wired as integers that become a PITA as floating point numbers
Example?
Elevation values, sometimes bin dimensions in a raster. Usually it's in RF engineering software that was written by RF engineers rather than GIS or remote sensing types.
RF = Radio Frequency to me. What does it mean to you? Also GIS pls.
What DAR said. Our customers use our geographic data products, like terrain and landcover models and sometimes building models to simulate and plan radio access networks - mostly mobile telco but sometimes smart meter or point-to-point or point-to-multipoint microwave networks.
Thanks (But that's not really what DAR said.)
What DAR said about GIS, the rest was expanding on your RF = Radio Frequency.
"Dude she's the Purdue Pharma of the black pill." - JasonL

"This thread is like a dog park where everyone lets their preconceptions and biases run around and sniff each others butts." - Hugh Akston

"That's just tokenism with extra steps." - Jake
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JD
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by JD »

I was going through some questionnaires at 23andme, and one of them was "do you have an os trigonum?" and of course I said "WTF is that" so I had to go look it up.

The os trigonum is an accessory bone, a third bone in the ankle, which most people do not have. Its presence is genetically determined. Most people who have it never even know, except that its presence can cause injury when the os trigonum gets pinched between the ankle bone and the heel bone and the ligament holding the os trigonum gets inflamed.
I sort of feel like a sucker about aspiring to be intellectually rigorous when I could just go on twitter and say capitalism causes space herpes and no one will challenge me on it. - Hugh Akston
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Jennifer
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Jennifer »

JD wrote: 10 Jul 2020, 09:26 I was going through some questionnaires at 23andme, and one of them was "do you have an os trigonum?" and of course I said "WTF is that" so I had to go look it up.

The os trigonum is an accessory bone, a third bone in the ankle, which most people do not have. Its presence is genetically determined. Most people who have it never even know, except that its presence can cause injury when the os trigonum gets pinched between the ankle bone and the heel bone and the ligament holding the os trigonum gets inflamed.
Huh. I'd never heard of that either, nor have I ever seen a 23and Me questionnaire, but I wonder: does it ask any questions about curved or misshapen toes? I have a minor little genetic quirk which I inherited from my father, who IIRC said his grandmother had it too, and who-knows how many generations before that: for most people, all five toes on the feet stick out straight forward, but with me, the middle toe on each foot curves slightly "inward" (toward the big toe), almost like it's trying to hide underneath its sibling. Doesn't affect my ability to walk or anything; at worst, the bottom of each middle toe has a more-or-less perma-callus no matter how many times I remove it. (Or, if I'd go on a hike that's more rigorous than usual, rigorous enough for ONE toe gets a blister on the bottom, it will be that curved middle toe.) Though I have occasionally wondered "When did this bent-toe quirk enter my family tree? I'd guess sometime AFTER they quit being nomads and settled down, on the theory 'This bent toe is only a minor annoyance for someone living the settled life, but if I had to walk miles and miles a day, EVERY day, especially without modern socks and shoes with supportive features (or at least, sneakers with soles thick enough to add almost an inch to my apparent height), maybe this would be a capital-p Problem."
"Myself, despite what they say about libertarians, I think we're actually allowed to pursue options beyond futility or sucking the dicks of the powerful." -- Eric the .5b
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Warren
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Warren »

John Hetherington, inventor of the top hat, caused a riot by wearing it in public for the first time
Wikipedia wrote:The story

The common form of the story, as reproduced in many books, has it that he was arraigned before the Lord Mayor on 15 January 1797 on a charge of breach of the peace and inciting a riot, and was required to post a £500 bond. Reportedly he had "appeared on the public highway wearing upon his head what he called a silk hat (which was shiny lustre and calculated to frighten timid people)" and the officers of the Crown stated that "several women fainted at the unusual sight, while children screamed, dogs yelped and a younger son of Cordwainer Thomas was thrown down by the crowd which collected and had his right arm broken".[1]
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Warren
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Warren »

From the 5thC Patreon, I learned the history of Heywood Shephed and his monument that (as of today) is still standing. If I was within 600 miles of it, I'd have to go see it.
Nobody, men included, wants a world where men treat women with the same respect they show to other men. - thoreau
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JD
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by JD »

Hail is a well-known phenomenon, but there's a less-well-understood phenomenon of ice falling from the sky, called a megacryometeor, in which large chunks of ice fall from a clear sky. Structural and chemical analysis shows them to be composed of atmospheric water and to apparently have a means of formation similar to hail, but no one has a good explanation for them.
I sort of feel like a sucker about aspiring to be intellectually rigorous when I could just go on twitter and say capitalism causes space herpes and no one will challenge me on it. - Hugh Akston
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JD
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by JD »

The world's very first author who we know by name was Enheduanna, a daughter* of Sargon of Akkad and a high priestess and important figure in her own right.

* apparently it is not 100% clear whether she was his actual daughter or whether that was more of a metaphorical term
I sort of feel like a sucker about aspiring to be intellectually rigorous when I could just go on twitter and say capitalism causes space herpes and no one will challenge me on it. - Hugh Akston
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Jennifer
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Jennifer »

Paloma means pigeon in Spanish. Which means Pablo Picasso named his daughter Pigeon.

I presume that bird has nicer connotations in Spanish than in English.
"Myself, despite what they say about libertarians, I think we're actually allowed to pursue options beyond futility or sucking the dicks of the powerful." -- Eric the .5b
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Eric the .5b
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Eric the .5b »

Jennifer wrote: 28 Jul 2020, 18:15 Paloma means pigeon in Spanish. Which means Pablo Picasso named his daughter Pigeon.

I presume that bird has nicer connotations in Spanish than in English.
The connotations are different even in English if you call them "doves".
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Jake
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Jake »

Jennifer wrote: 28 Jul 2020, 18:15 Paloma means pigeon in Spanish. Which means Pablo Picasso named his daughter Pigeon.

I presume that bird has nicer connotations in Spanish than in English.
I don't know... "known for shitting on art" might be the most appropriate thing ever for a member of the Picasso family. ;)
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Mo
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Mo »

Eric the .5b wrote: 28 Jul 2020, 18:46
Jennifer wrote: 28 Jul 2020, 18:15 Paloma means pigeon in Spanish. Which means Pablo Picasso named his daughter Pigeon.

I presume that bird has nicer connotations in Spanish than in English.
The connotations are different even in English if you call them "doves".
This. A lot of languages, including Spanish and Arabic, use the same word for pigeon and dove. The common pigeon is the same species as the rock dove.
his voice is so soothing, but why do conspiracy nuts always sound like Batman and Robin solving one of Riddler's puzzles out loud? - fod

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Hugh Akston
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

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Pigeons have also been a popular hobby and food source for millennia. Every pigeon in North America is a feral descendant of beloved domestic pets brought over from Europe and the Middle East.
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Warren
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Warren »

Hugh Akston wrote: 29 Jul 2020, 02:58 Pigeons have also been a popular hobby and food source for millennia. Every pigeon in North America is a feral descendant of beloved domestic pets brought over from Europe and the Middle East.
Which is a perfectly good reason to hate all the peoples of Europe and the Middle East.
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Mo
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Mo »

Mrs Mo got us an AirBnB for short term housing in Singapore. Turns out it’s near Singapore’s RLD.
his voice is so soothing, but why do conspiracy nuts always sound like Batman and Robin solving one of Riddler's puzzles out loud? - fod

no one ever yells worldstar when a pet gets fucked up - dhex
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Hugh Akston
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Hugh Akston »

Mo wrote: 29 Jul 2020, 10:55 Mrs Mo got us an AirBnB for short term housing in Singapore. Turns out it’s near Singapore’s RLD.
I hope she got a good price. Downwind of the rusty latrine depot doesn't sound like the most desirable location.
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Warren
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Warren »

Hugh Akston wrote: 29 Jul 2020, 11:10
Mo wrote: 29 Jul 2020, 10:55 Mrs Mo got us an AirBnB for short term housing in Singapore. Turns out it’s near Singapore’s RLD.
I hope she got a good price. Downwind of the rusty latrine depot doesn't sound like the most desirable location.
I think it's the Rancid Livers District
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lunchstealer
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Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by lunchstealer »

Shakespeare presaged Ralph Wiggam by 400 years.

"Richard II" Act 2 Scene 2:
For us to levy power
Proportionable to the enemy
Is all unpossible.
"Dude she's the Purdue Pharma of the black pill." - JasonL

"This thread is like a dog park where everyone lets their preconceptions and biases run around and sniff each others butts." - Hugh Akston

"That's just tokenism with extra steps." - Jake
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