You Learn Something New Every Day

Music, books, movies, TV, games, hobbies, food, and potent potables. And forum games! Pour a drink, put on your smoking jacket, light a pipe (of whatever), and settle in.
User avatar
Aresen
Posts: 16954
Joined: 26 Apr 2010, 20:18
Location: Great White Pacific Northwest

Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Aresen »

Mo wrote:
06 Jun 2020, 18:58
The last recipient of a Civil War pension died last week.

https://kottke.org/20/06/last-person-to ... nsion-dies
So, assuming the US got out of Afghanistan today, there would be veteran's benefits until 2175?
If Trump supporters wanted a tough guy, why did they elect such a whiny bitch? - Mo

Those who know history are doomed to deja vu. - the innominate one

Never bring a knife to a joke fight" - dhex

User avatar
Painboy
Posts: 4563
Joined: 18 Feb 2013, 11:33
Location: Seattle

Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Painboy »

Why Lead Poisoning Probably Did Not Cause the Downfall of the Roman Empire
Many people seem to have the impression that everyone in ancient Rome suffered from lead poisoning because the Romans used pipes made of lead. Indeed, many people seem to think that this was a major contributing factor in the decline of the Roman Empire. This idea is largely inaccurate, but there is some truth behind it. It is certain that some people in ancient Rome did suffer from lead poisoning. Nonetheless, we have very little evidence to indicate that lead poisoning was ever a widespread ailment on the scale that most people seem to imagine. Contrary to popular speculation, it is highly unlikely that lead poisoning played a significant role in the decline and fall of the Roman Empire. It is also highly unlikely that lead poisoning made any Roman emperors go insane.
Although modern theories about lead poisoning in ancient Rome almost invariably seem to focus on the fact that the Romans used lead pipes, most lead poisoning in ancient times actually did not come from the pipes. In fact, it is generally thought among historians that, although ancient Roman tap water did contain higher amounts of lead than tap water today, it probably did not usually contain a high enough concentration of lead to actually be harmful.

This was due to two reasons. The first reason is because a thick residue of calcium carbonate quickly built up on the insides of Roman lead pipes, insulating the water from the lead of the pipes. The second reason is because the water in the pipes was always running, meaning it was not in the pipes for long enough to actually become seriously contaminated.

A study conducted in 2014 estimated that, although ancient Roman tap water probably contained around 100 times as much lead as the water from local springs, the estimated lead concentrations were still probably not high enough to be harmful

User avatar
JD
Posts: 11981
Joined: 05 May 2010, 15:26

Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by JD »

Sharecropping as a feature of the South is partly due to the Civil War and the destruction of the economy. After the war, plantation owners still owned their land but had virtually no cash and could no longer command slave labor; freedmen had their labor to sell but nothing else. The freedmen couldn't work as wage labor for plantation owners because of the owners' lack of cash, and they couldn't be tenant farmers because of the freedmen's lack of cash. At best they could use their labor and pay for the land (and anything else the owner provided, like equipment or animals) in kind, which at least had the advantage of the owner and sharecropper sharing the risks and rewards of the harvest.
I sort of feel like a sucker about aspiring to be intellectually rigorous when I could just go on twitter and say capitalism causes space herpes and no one will challenge me on it. - Hugh Akston

User avatar
Kolohe
Posts: 14514
Joined: 06 May 2010, 10:51

Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Kolohe »

One of the problems I have with the current Reconstruction revisionists is that there was really no way to un-fuck the Southern economy in the short term.

Maybe, maybe, something like 'industrial socialism' that eventually transitioned to a 'neoliberal' order may have worked. But that would have been an even harder sell than 'hey y'all should let black folks vote and stuff'.
when you wake up as the queen of the n=1 kingdom and mount your steed non sequiturius, do you look out upon all you survey and think “damn, it feels good to be a green idea sleeping furiously?" - dhex

User avatar
Hugh Akston
Posts: 19454
Joined: 05 May 2010, 15:51
Location: El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora Reina de los Angeles

Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Hugh Akston »

Post hoc eminent domain payments to former slaveowners combined with land grants to freedmen would have been a good start.
"Is a Lulztopia the best we can hope for?!?" ~Taktix®
"Somali pirates are beholden to their hostages in a way that the USG is not." ~Dangerman

User avatar
Warren
Posts: 29670
Joined: 26 Apr 2010, 17:03
Location: Goat Rope MO
Contact:

Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Warren »

Hugh Akston wrote:
19 Jun 2020, 15:20
Post hoc eminent domain payments to former slaveowners combined with land grants to freedmen would have been a good start.
Followed immediately by the freedmen selling back their land to the Big House because they didn't have the means to work it.
THIS SPACE FOR RENT

User avatar
Hugh Akston
Posts: 19454
Joined: 05 May 2010, 15:51
Location: El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora Reina de los Angeles

Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Hugh Akston »

Warren wrote:
19 Jun 2020, 16:12
Hugh Akston wrote:
19 Jun 2020, 15:20
Post hoc eminent domain payments to former slaveowners combined with land grants to freedmen would have been a good start.
Followed immediately by the freedmen selling back their land to the Big House because they didn't have the means to work it.
Land is collateral for loans to buy seed, livestock, and materials. That's largely how farming works. If the government was feeling particularly ambitious about the prosperity of freedmen, they could have offered a low-interest loan program to substitute for financial institutions that won't deal with blacks or were patriotically burned to the ground.
"Is a Lulztopia the best we can hope for?!?" ~Taktix®
"Somali pirates are beholden to their hostages in a way that the USG is not." ~Dangerman

User avatar
Kolohe
Posts: 14514
Joined: 06 May 2010, 10:51

Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Kolohe »

Warren is right though. You give all the (until 5 minutes ago, rich) white people money, and you give all the black people land, pretty soon the white people are going to have all the land and the money again.
when you wake up as the queen of the n=1 kingdom and mount your steed non sequiturius, do you look out upon all you survey and think “damn, it feels good to be a green idea sleeping furiously?" - dhex

User avatar
Hugh Akston
Posts: 19454
Joined: 05 May 2010, 15:51
Location: El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora Reina de los Angeles

Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Hugh Akston »

Kolohe wrote:
19 Jun 2020, 20:07
Warren is right though. You give all the (until 5 minutes ago, rich) white people money, and you give all the black people land, pretty soon the white people are going to have all the land and the money again.
How?
"Is a Lulztopia the best we can hope for?!?" ~Taktix®
"Somali pirates are beholden to their hostages in a way that the USG is not." ~Dangerman

User avatar
Kolohe
Posts: 14514
Joined: 06 May 2010, 10:51

Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Kolohe »

Because that’s what happened to the western land grants to poor white people until prairie populism rose up as a reaction to that dynamic.

And to the extent the farms of Prairie were able to rise above subsistence agriculture (which many never did, as all those Depression era WPA photos show) they did so because the process for harvesting the grain crops they were raising and selling had significant mechanization by then. The South wasn’t going to be able to compete head to head with that, not in a common market.

The crops that the South did specialize in were significantly labor intensive. Plus, in the late 19th century, worldwide competition from Egypt and India were going to keep prices down, making labor gains that much harder.
when you wake up as the queen of the n=1 kingdom and mount your steed non sequiturius, do you look out upon all you survey and think “damn, it feels good to be a green idea sleeping furiously?" - dhex

User avatar
Kolohe
Posts: 14514
Joined: 06 May 2010, 10:51

Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Kolohe »

'Alternate side of the street parking rules' was something I mostly just know about from mentions in 1010 WINS traffic report. I don't think I realized that they had to do with streetsweeping.
when you wake up as the queen of the n=1 kingdom and mount your steed non sequiturius, do you look out upon all you survey and think “damn, it feels good to be a green idea sleeping furiously?" - dhex

User avatar
Mo
Posts: 25558
Joined: 26 Apr 2010, 17:08

Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Mo »

There is no standard foot in the US and different states may use different definitions of a foot.

his voice is so soothing, but why do conspiracy nuts always sound like Batman and Robin solving one of Riddler's puzzles out loud? - fod

no one ever yells worldstar when a pet gets fucked up - dhex

User avatar
Warren
Posts: 29670
Joined: 26 Apr 2010, 17:03
Location: Goat Rope MO
Contact:

Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Warren »

Mo wrote:
27 Jun 2020, 11:10
There is no standard foot in the US and different states may use different definitions of a foot.

Well 19 States are still using Metes and Bounds. So we can't really afford a fixed unit of measurement.
THIS SPACE FOR RENT

User avatar
Highway
Posts: 13726
Joined: 12 May 2011, 00:22
Location: the Electric Ocean

Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Highway »

Mo wrote:
27 Jun 2020, 11:10
There is no standard foot in the US and different states may use different definitions of a foot.
Well, it's more that there are 2 standard definitions of a foot and states have picked one or the other. But honestly, this is a lot less of a problem than you might think. I'm sure there are some projects where some new guy picks the wrong conversion and it doesn't get caught, or where some out-of-state designer doesn't realize that the state the project is in uses a different standard. And all our engineering projects use US Survey Feet, for multiple state and county agency clients.

The article also presumes a lot when it talks about the conversion of GPS from meters. That's not how most of our work goes. Every project is locally surveyed from known or assumed benchmarks. And development of that project is done entirely within that local survey. If we do use GPS, it's to fill in area outside of that survey. And that does require selecting the correct conversion factor, but that's all it takes (and usually it's super obvious when it isn't picked correctly).

What we have a bigger issue with is the different datums /coordinate sets used in our state. State agencies use one datum, most counties use another one. And there's not really a good conversion between the two. There's a consistent elevation difference, but it's another time for things to go the wrong way (was this 0.89 higher or lower?)

lunchstealer's stuff might be more of a pain with different feet, but maybe his work output is just in meters.
"Sharks do not go around challenging people to games of chance like dojo breakers."

User avatar
Kolohe
Posts: 14514
Joined: 06 May 2010, 10:51

Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Kolohe »

I’m very surprised that not everyone uses WGS 84 by now.

ETA - like even 15 years ago, in my line of work finding something that was in NAD was like finding a Dead Sea scroll.
when you wake up as the queen of the n=1 kingdom and mount your steed non sequiturius, do you look out upon all you survey and think “damn, it feels good to be a green idea sleeping furiously?" - dhex

User avatar
Highway
Posts: 13726
Joined: 12 May 2011, 00:22
Location: the Electric Ocean

Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Highway »

Kolohe wrote:
27 Jun 2020, 12:36
I’m very surprised that not everyone uses WGS 84 by now.

ETA - like even 15 years ago, in my line of work finding something that was in NAD was like finding a Dead Sea scroll.
Everything we do is in NAD83/91 coordinates, either with the NAVD88 or NGVD29 datums.
"Sharks do not go around challenging people to games of chance like dojo breakers."

User avatar
dhex
Posts: 16206
Joined: 05 May 2010, 16:05
Location: 'murica

Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by dhex »

"i ran over the cat and didnt stop just carried on with tears in my eyes joose driving my way to work." - God

User avatar
Hugh Akston
Posts: 19454
Joined: 05 May 2010, 15:51
Location: El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora Reina de los Angeles

Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Hugh Akston »

dhex wrote:
27 Jun 2020, 14:51
https://nypost.com/2020/06/27/former-tr ... -on-cameo/

MOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCH!
I guess we should start collecting for dhex's birthday.
"Is a Lulztopia the best we can hope for?!?" ~Taktix®
"Somali pirates are beholden to their hostages in a way that the USG is not." ~Dangerman

User avatar
Eric the .5b
Posts: 14824
Joined: 26 Apr 2010, 16:29

Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Eric the .5b »

Highway wrote:
27 Jun 2020, 12:06
Well, it's more that there are 2 standard definitions of a foot and states have picked one or the other. But honestly, this is a lot less of a problem than you might think. I'm sure there are some projects where some new guy picks the wrong conversion and it doesn't get caught, or where some out-of-state designer doesn't realize that the state the project is in uses a different standard. And all our engineering projects use US Survey Feet, for multiple state and county agency clients.
Yeah, I was thinking that it couldn't have been much of an issue when only a few states use international feet and a couple "don't specify" (in a way that makes me suspect it damn well is specified somewhere).

And talking about GPS as if it was a primary thing for surveying was bizarre.
"Better that ten guilty persons escape than that one innocent suffer."
Cet animal est très méchant / Quand on l'attaque il se défend.

User avatar
lunchstealer
Posts: 18586
Joined: 26 Apr 2010, 17:25
Location: The Local Fluff in the Local Bubble

Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by lunchstealer »

Highway wrote:
27 Jun 2020, 12:06
Mo wrote:
27 Jun 2020, 11:10
There is no standard foot in the US and different states may use different definitions of a foot.
Well, it's more that there are 2 standard definitions of a foot and states have picked one or the other. But honestly, this is a lot less of a problem than you might think. I'm sure there are some projects where some new guy picks the wrong conversion and it doesn't get caught, or where some out-of-state designer doesn't realize that the state the project is in uses a different standard. And all our engineering projects use US Survey Feet, for multiple state and county agency clients.

The article also presumes a lot when it talks about the conversion of GPS from meters. That's not how most of our work goes. Every project is locally surveyed from known or assumed benchmarks. And development of that project is done entirely within that local survey. If we do use GPS, it's to fill in area outside of that survey. And that does require selecting the correct conversion factor, but that's all it takes (and usually it's super obvious when it isn't picked correctly).

What we have a bigger issue with is the different datums /coordinate sets used in our state. State agencies use one datum, most counties use another one. And there's not really a good conversion between the two. There's a consistent elevation difference, but it's another time for things to go the wrong way (was this 0.89 higher or lower?)

lunchstealer's stuff might be more of a pain with different feet, but maybe his work output is just in meters.
I just work in meters. I sometimes wish I could work in decimal feet or decimeters, because there are some things that are hard wired as integers that become a PITA as floating point numbers and so having smaller units means you can get the resolution you need out of those integers. In other ways it'd probably cause other problems as you might get values outside of the short-integer range but life is pain.
"The constitution is more of a BDSM agreement with a safe word." - Sandy

"Dude she's the Purdue Pharma of the black pill." - JasonL

"This thread is like a dog park where everyone lets their preconceptions and biases run around and sniff each others butts." - Hugh Akston

User avatar
Warren
Posts: 29670
Joined: 26 Apr 2010, 17:03
Location: Goat Rope MO
Contact:

Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Warren »

lunchstealer wrote:
01 Jul 2020, 15:36
there are some things that are hard wired as integers that become a PITA as floating point numbers
Example?
THIS SPACE FOR RENT

User avatar
lunchstealer
Posts: 18586
Joined: 26 Apr 2010, 17:25
Location: The Local Fluff in the Local Bubble

Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by lunchstealer »

Warren wrote:
01 Jul 2020, 19:44
lunchstealer wrote:
01 Jul 2020, 15:36
there are some things that are hard wired as integers that become a PITA as floating point numbers
Example?
Elevation values, sometimes bin dimensions in a raster. Usually it's in RF engineering software that was written by RF engineers rather than GIS or remote sensing types.
"The constitution is more of a BDSM agreement with a safe word." - Sandy

"Dude she's the Purdue Pharma of the black pill." - JasonL

"This thread is like a dog park where everyone lets their preconceptions and biases run around and sniff each others butts." - Hugh Akston

User avatar
Warren
Posts: 29670
Joined: 26 Apr 2010, 17:03
Location: Goat Rope MO
Contact:

Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Warren »

lunchstealer wrote:
01 Jul 2020, 19:48
Warren wrote:
01 Jul 2020, 19:44
lunchstealer wrote:
01 Jul 2020, 15:36
there are some things that are hard wired as integers that become a PITA as floating point numbers
Example?
Elevation values, sometimes bin dimensions in a raster. Usually it's in RF engineering software that was written by RF engineers rather than GIS or remote sensing types.
RF = Radio Frequency to me. What does it mean to you? Also GIS pls.
THIS SPACE FOR RENT

User avatar
D.A. Ridgely
Posts: 20099
Joined: 26 Apr 2010, 17:09
Location: The Other Side

Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by D.A. Ridgely »

Warren wrote:
01 Jul 2020, 20:22
lunchstealer wrote:
01 Jul 2020, 19:48
Warren wrote:
01 Jul 2020, 19:44
lunchstealer wrote:
01 Jul 2020, 15:36
there are some things that are hard wired as integers that become a PITA as floating point numbers
Example?
Elevation values, sometimes bin dimensions in a raster. Usually it's in RF engineering software that was written by RF engineers rather than GIS or remote sensing types.
RF = Radio Frequency to me. What does it mean to you? Also GIS pls.
Geographic Information Systems, of course! Hell, any liberal arts major could have told you that!

User avatar
Warren
Posts: 29670
Joined: 26 Apr 2010, 17:03
Location: Goat Rope MO
Contact:

Re: You Learn Something New Every Day

Post by Warren »

D.A. Ridgely wrote:
01 Jul 2020, 21:27
Warren wrote:
01 Jul 2020, 20:22
lunchstealer wrote:
01 Jul 2020, 19:48
Warren wrote:
01 Jul 2020, 19:44
lunchstealer wrote:
01 Jul 2020, 15:36
there are some things that are hard wired as integers that become a PITA as floating point numbers
Example?
Elevation values, sometimes bin dimensions in a raster. Usually it's in RF engineering software that was written by RF engineers rather than GIS or remote sensing types.
RF = Radio Frequency to me. What does it mean to you? Also GIS pls.
Geographic Information Systems, of course! Hell, any liberal arts major could have told you that!
Your average liberal arts major thinks 'Geographic Information System' is the search engine for nationalgeographic.com
THIS SPACE FOR RENT

Post Reply