Food

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D.A. Ridgely
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Re: Food

Post by D.A. Ridgely »

Just finished frying (or as we say in the South, frying up) some chicken for dinner.

It was one of the few dishes my mother cooked when I was a child that I missed when I grew up and it took me nearly forever to learn how to pan fry enough chicken to feed a family, but it was time well spent. We has prime bone-in ribeye steaks two nights ago and they were dammed good, but I think I'm looking forward even more to the fried chicken.

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JasonL
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Re: Food

Post by JasonL »

Fried chicken is one of the best things in the world.

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Warren
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Re: Food

Post by Warren »

JasonL wrote:
09 Apr 2020, 18:12
Fried chicken is one of the best things in the world.
I mean. I'm not saying I'd kick it out of bed. But a rotisserie chicken is a carcass.
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Eric the .5b
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Re: Food

Post by Eric the .5b »

I've been craving fried chicken ever since I started hunkering down.
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Highway
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Re: Food

Post by Highway »

I'd like to have some too, but my wife doesn't usually want it, so it's a rare thing when we're eating together, like we are now for pretty much every meal.
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JD
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Re: Food

Post by JD »

Had some roasted turkey breast last night, basted with a brown sugar-butter-herb baste. There was so much sugar in the baste it made it kind of like candied turkey, but it was really tasty.

Tonight we're going to make turkey tetrazzini. The best choice we have in pasta is rotelli, so it may come out a little different, but we'll see.
I sort of feel like a sucker about aspiring to be intellectually rigorous when I could just go on twitter and say capitalism causes space herpes and no one will challenge me on it. - Hugh Akston

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dead_elvis
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Re: Food

Post by dead_elvis »

Looks like I fucked up the sourdough starter. It's been a pretty chilly so it was slow to get going, then one day I noticed it got going pretty well with the bubbles but yeech, the smell was deeply funky. I hoped this was harmless like how fermenting beer can smell like sulphur farts, but googling tells me this is likely clostridium, a bad bacteria, likely caused by not feeding it enough (because I was trying to conserve flour). Can't chance anything bad so out it goes.
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D.A. Ridgely
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Re: Food

Post by D.A. Ridgely »

I guess I understand why making sourdough bread has suddenly gained in popularity here but, if anything, there's far and away too much sourdough bread here in Texas for me to go all Lonesome Dove. Case in point, the Central Market, an upscale Whole Foods sort of operation, makes sourdough rye bread, which I didn't even think was possible, let alone marketable. Worse yet, because it has far and away the best supermarket baked goods section here in Dallas, they don't make an *ordinary* rye. Go figure.

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JasonL
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Re: Food

Post by JasonL »

Ooh I'm happy with whatever to call what I just did. The premise is japanese inflected red beans and rice.

Used Rancho Gordo eye of the goat beans. If you don't know rancho gordo but like pots of beans, get to know rancho gordo. https://www.ranchogordo.com/products/oj ... 2570817987

Did a quick soak for 3 hours in well salted water, only 3 hours because I used the insta pot.

Made a dashi.
Rendered a half pound of bacon on saute setting, removed bacon to a bowl. A head of garlic cut to expose the cloves face down in the fat, a large onion in quarters in there and also a good 2" piece of ginger lightly mashed with a knife. Develop caramel on all that stuff, turning to get surfaces on the onion and flipping the ginger.

Remove that stuff. Beans in, toss with fat. Add dashi to 2" over beans. If a bit short as I was due to using rest of dashi elsewhere, add water. More salt. Black pepper. 1 tbsp soy sauce, 1 tbsp fish sauce. 1 bay leaf. Add onions ginger and garlic back to top. Ideally separate from beans with a layer of cheese cloth but I didn't do that. Seal and cook high pressure for about 45 mins (will vary by bean - start with 35 and see). Remove onions ginger and garlic. If not done leave on saute low for 10 min increments until soft. Add 2 tbsp mirin, 1 tbsp chinkiang vinegar and spice it up with shichimi togarashi pepper and sesame blend - like a good amount maybe a tbsp.

Make rice and serve like red beans and rice. The broth is unreal. Maybe top with furikake or maybe add like wakame seaweed. It's really good.

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Jadagul
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Re: Food

Post by Jadagul »

Doesn't look like there are kidney beans at the bean supplier. :(

(Which makes it hard for me to call these red beans. :P)

But I might have to explore fancy beans at some point.

(I'm also opposed to soaking beans for red beans and rice, but you're going for a different flavor profile anyway.)

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JasonL
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Re: Food

Post by JasonL »

RG specializes in heirloom varieties of more common beans. Their red kidney is the Domingo Rojo varietal. I use it in chili. Cassoulet with their flageolets is amazing.

I've tried both ways, but I have settled on overnight soak with significant salt if I'm doing stovetop, and about a 3 hour short soak with significant salt if I'm pressure cooking. I get better results pressure cooking to be honest. Just don't over do it - north of 45 mins is a lot at high pressure.

ETA the goats eye are deffo not a red bean. They are a ... I dunno what color bean. Make a great broth tho.

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Jadagul
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Re: Food

Post by Jadagul »

JasonL wrote:
08 May 2020, 23:56
RG specializes in heirloom varieties of more common beans. Their red kidney is the Domingo Rojo varietal. I use it in chili. Cassoulet with their flageolets is amazing.

I've tried both ways, but I have settled on overnight soak with significant salt if I'm doing stovetop, and about a 3 hour short soak with significant salt if I'm pressure cooking. I get better results pressure cooking to be honest. Just don't over do it - north of 45 mins is a lot at high pressure.

ETA the goats eye are deffo not a red bean. They are a ... I dunno what color bean. Make a great broth tho.
Pre-soaking the beans gives a very different flavor from not pre-soaking them, and I don't particularly care for it. A lot of people do, though. (One thing to remember is that when I make red beans I am chasing the taste of home. Mom didn't soak the beans, so that doesn't taste _right_ to me.)

I also do them like two hours in the pressure cooker; that's how long it takes them to genuinely fall apart. Stovetop it takes like eight hours or so to do it right.

But I will have to check out the Domingo Rojo at some point and see if that improves the flavor for me.

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JasonL
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Re: Food

Post by JasonL »

I seek creamy broth but mostly intact beans with some split skins here and there. I do know traditional red beans and rice normally is more disintegrated than that but it has insufficient textural variation to me.

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Jadagul
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Re: Food

Post by Jadagul »

Yeah, that's pretty reasonable. I've never been a fan of the texture of whole beans, but really I'm trying to make "what Mom made, but better"—this is one of the like two or three things she actually cooked regularly while I was growing up.

I normally make them in the pressure cooker these days, but I'm actually planning to do them long-form starting in about twenty minutes. And also chop and freeze like fifteen pounds of aromatics, as a project for the day.

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Jasper
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Re: Food

Post by Jasper »

Ha - I went the opposite way this weekend.

Chicken stock turned into spicy red miso broth.
Noooooodles.
Cayenne-seasoned chicken-thigh katsu.
Sriracha-marinated soft boiled eggs.
Celery quickly sauteed in butter.
Little bit of Chinese black vinegar drizzled on top.

It was on a whim, and came out OK. Broth was quick n dirty: garlic, chili paste, & scallion whites fried until fragrant, BtB Chicken stock, & too much red miso. If I do it again, I'd try half red & half white, and add less overall to start. The chicken thighs were lovely. Eggs were eggs; only a 2 hour soak of 25% Siriacha in 1% brine. Not even sure if such a short soak was worth it. Celery was fine, if a little forced.

ETA: Was going for buffalo chicken wing ramen, as a laugh.
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JasonL
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Re: Food

Post by JasonL »

Sounds like a workable plan - the miso + btb is a lot of salt though.

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Jadagul
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Re: Food

Post by Jadagul »

Oh, it occurs to me I should mention that I have an instagram for my baking and sometimes cooking. https://www.instagram.com/profjaydaigle/ I need to go ahead and post my red beans and rice, and my Mary Todd Lincoln almond cake from this weekend.

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Jennifer
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Re: Food

Post by Jennifer »

Jeff bought the instant coffee version of Cafe Bustelo, because Alton Brown has some coffee-flavored whipped cream recipe using Bustelo instant as an ingredient. (He hasn't made it yet; the instant coffee jar remains unopened.) I had heard good things about Bustelo so I bought a can of the regular-ground version to make my cold-brew coffee. (Jeff still makes hot-brew, and orders of magnitude stronger than I like MY coffee, so our household now has segregated coffee equipment.)

The cold-brew Bustelo is tastier than regular store-brand cold-brew (though I haven't yet decided if the taste differential is enough to justify Bustelo's higher price) ... but compared to regular dry ground coffee, the Bustelo is VERY prone to leaving stains. I don't know if that's something unique to the type of beans they use, or if it's a result of the grinding process -- the Bustelo is ground FAR more finely than most ground coffee. Looks more like dark sand than anything else. I used a cheap white plastic measuring spoon to scoop the dry coffee into the cold-brew mesh filter, and also to "stir/compress" the coffee therein (ground coffee is not good at wicking moisture through it, so you have to mix all the coffee and water together before letting it steep -- if there is, like, some bubble-lump of dry coffee in the middle of those wet grounds, the water will NOT seep into that dry spot even if the cold-brew pitcher steeps in the fridge for several days) -- that spoon now has blackish-brown stains in places, from where I used it to mix the coffee. Same holds true for the white plastic "Chinese" soup spoon I'd used to stir the first batch of Bustelo cold brew -- though that spoon was so very old, I wasn't sure at first if it was the coffee, or just some previous discoloration I'd never noticed before.

Also, my home dishwasher even has problems with it -- the last load I did, there must have been a tiny amount of dry Bustelo powder on something, because I removed a clean plate with what initially looked like a small dark crack in the ceramic -- except that "dark crack" came off when I ran it under water and scrubbed it a bit with my thumb. (I can't say for certain that dark stuff was Bustelo -- but I can't think of anything else it might be.)
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Jennifer
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Re: Food

Post by Jennifer »

Made cream of peanut soup from a circa-1960s "Southern Cookbook": make a roux; add a quart of milk and bring to a boil, stirring constantly; melt in a cup of creamy peanut butter; add a bit of salt and a couple tablespoons of dry sherry; serve.

As is, the recipe was okay but rather bland. With the addition of black pepper, chili powder and some bacon bits, it was pretty good. Next time I make this, I will use the basic recipe as a "broth" for some type of spicy/savory soup: maybe bacon or salted ham, plus black pepper and chili powder and maybe just a dash of cayenne.

Unsurprisingly, the recipe is SUPER-filling; I only had about half of a Campbell's soup mug and now I feel downright stuffed. Jeff only had slightly more than I did. More than half the recipe remains; I don't know how well it will work reheated as a leftover.

ETA: Yikes, here's a horrifying thought: Jeff pointed out that in the 60s, when that "Southern Cookbook" was published (the front page says "Copyright 1969, 1967, 1965"), peanut butter was a LOT more oily than now, and would often separate into oily layers in its jar. And I just-now realized: I don't know when 2 percent milk (which we buy) became commonplace; maybe in the 1960s, that soup would've been even MORE heavy, between the extra oil in the peanut butter, and possibly the extra dairy fat from the whole milk.
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D.A. Ridgely
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Re: Food

Post by D.A. Ridgely »

Jennifer wrote:
06 Jul 2020, 21:51
Made cream of peanut soup from a circa-1960s "Southern Cookbook": make a roux; add a quart of milk and bring to a boil, stirring constantly; melt in a cup of creamy peanut butter; add a bit of salt and a couple tablespoons of dry sherry; serve.

As is, the recipe was okay but rather bland. With the addition of black pepper, chili powder and some bacon bits, it was pretty good. Next time I make this, I will use the basic recipe as a "broth" for some type of spicy/savory soup: maybe bacon or salted ham, plus black pepper and chili powder and maybe just a dash of cayenne.

Unsurprisingly, the recipe is SUPER-filling; I only had about half of a Campbell's soup mug and now I feel downright stuffed. Jeff only had slightly more than I did. More than half the recipe remains; I don't know how well it will work reheated as a leftover.

ETA: Yikes, here's a horrifying thought: Jeff pointed out that in the 60s, when that "Southern Cookbook" was published (the front page says "Copyright 1969, 1967, 1965"), peanut butter was a LOT more oily than now, and would often separate into oily layers in its jar. And I just-now realized: I don't know when 2 percent milk (which we buy) became commonplace; maybe in the 1960s, that soup would've been even MORE heavy, between the extra oil in the peanut butter, and possibly the extra dairy fat from the whole milk.
You're probably right about the ingredients now and then. I rarely make it any more but this recipe from my student days in Williamsburg is quite good.

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dhex
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Re: Food

Post by dhex »

Jennifer wrote:
10 Jun 2020, 17:03
Jeff bought the instant coffee version of Cafe Bustelo, because Alton Brown has some coffee-flavored whipped cream recipe using Bustelo instant as an ingredient. (He hasn't made it yet; the instant coffee jar remains unopened.) I had heard good things about Bustelo so I bought a can of the regular-ground version to make my cold-brew coffee. (Jeff still makes hot-brew, and orders of magnitude stronger than I like MY coffee, so our household now has segregated coffee equipment.)

The cold-brew Bustelo is tastier than regular store-brand cold-brew (though I haven't yet decided if the taste differential is enough to justify Bustelo's higher price) ... but compared to regular dry ground coffee, the Bustelo is VERY prone to leaving stains. I don't know if that's something unique to the type of beans they use, or if it's a result of the grinding process -- the Bustelo is ground FAR more finely than most ground coffee. Looks more like dark sand than anything else. I used a cheap white plastic measuring spoon to scoop the dry coffee into the cold-brew mesh filter, and also to "stir/compress" the coffee therein (ground coffee is not good at wicking moisture through it, so you have to mix all the coffee and water together before letting it steep -- if there is, like, some bubble-lump of dry coffee in the middle of those wet grounds, the water will NOT seep into that dry spot even if the cold-brew pitcher steeps in the fridge for several days) -- that spoon now has blackish-brown stains in places, from where I used it to mix the coffee. Same holds true for the white plastic "Chinese" soup spoon I'd used to stir the first batch of Bustelo cold brew -- though that spoon was so very old, I wasn't sure at first if it was the coffee, or just some previous discoloration I'd never noticed before.

Also, my home dishwasher even has problems with it -- the last load I did, there must have been a tiny amount of dry Bustelo powder on something, because I removed a clean plate with what initially looked like a small dark crack in the ceramic -- except that "dark crack" came off when I ran it under water and scrubbed it a bit with my thumb. (I can't say for certain that dark stuff was Bustelo -- but I can't think of anything else it might be.)
Bustelo is an espresso roast created for Cubans in the Bronx it is not subtle.
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dbcooper
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Re: Food

Post by dbcooper »

This cow's been dead since 1968, but its tongue lives on. That's a thing innit.
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JD
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Re: Food

Post by JD »

I'm going to have to ask my inlaws about peanut soup.

Over here, I made sorbet for the first time, from strawberries. I think it came out pretty well. Of course my mom was all "strawberry isn't my favorite flavor" and my wife was all "this is too sweet", but it is literally strawberries with added sugar, so... I added a bit of white rum to prevent ice crystals and a pinch of salt and some lemon juice, and that was it.

It is certainly easier than ice cream in that you don't have to make a custard, you just puree everything together and off you go. But it still takes some time, because without the fats and protein it doesn't "structure" in the mixer like ice cream does, so it takes a lot longer to set up. I figured that after the mixer and several hours in the freezer, it would be completely done, but it was still pretty soft. Only after about 24 hours in the freezer did it firm up to what I would consider "normal sorbet texture". I might try mango next.
I sort of feel like a sucker about aspiring to be intellectually rigorous when I could just go on twitter and say capitalism causes space herpes and no one will challenge me on it. - Hugh Akston

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dbcooper
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Re: Food

Post by dbcooper »

Scotch fillet steak (prime rib) was $5.60 per pound yesterday. Accordingly, I had a rather large steak tonight.
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Warren
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Re: Food

Post by Warren »

dbcooper wrote:
18 Jul 2020, 02:22
Scotch fillet steak (prime rib) was $5.60 per pound yesterday. Accordingly, I had a rather large steak tonight.
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