Food

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lunchstealer
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Re: Food

Post by lunchstealer » 11 Sep 2019, 10:43

JasonL wrote:The kroger cheese counter provided by Murrays is freaking awesome for a big grocery chain. Murrays Reserve Gouda is the shit.
Yup it is Murray’s so I will seek out the reserve Gouda.
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JD
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Re: Food

Post by JD » 14 Sep 2019, 21:24

We harvested a lot of chives from our garden today, leaving us with the question of what we were going to do with them. Later that day I had an idea.

Me: Hey, I know what to do with those chives.
Wife: What?
Me: We need to get a turkey, and then we can make...
Wife: No.
Me: ...chive turkey.
Wife: I could see it coming but I couldn't stop it.

Actually, we'll probably make chive butter, keep that in the freezer, and break it out for the holidays.
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Warren
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Re: Food

Post by Warren » 29 Sep 2019, 19:41

Anybody use a hot air fryer?
I just picked one up and used it for the first time. The instruction booklet has a quick reference table for various things. A number of items have a two step process the first cook (called "blanch") is done at at lower temp and then the fryer is turned up for the second cook (called "fry"). French fries would take a half hour done that way. My usual cook method for rosemary potatoes is to boil them and then fry them in a hot skillet. So cubed up some Yukon Gold potatoes (half an inch) and boiled them for 6 minutes. Then I drained them and hit them with some olive oil, rosemary, salt, and pepper. Then into the air fryer (turned up full blast 400 degF) for six minutes, give them a shake, and then another six minutes. They came out GBD and crispy, and way less oily than my usual method. Then I whipped up a little rosemary aioli (aka mayo+) to dip them in.

I also did some chicken fingers. Prep with salt, pepper, and paprika. Then egg wash and panko bread crumbs. I meant to spray with olive oil, but I forgot. I had a couple fingers too many to load in my 2.5L basket without overlapping. Six min. on high, then turn, another six min, another turn and just two more min. to finish them off. The coating came out crispy, though would probably have been better with a spritz of oil. The chicken was cooked all the way through and still moist. Not dry at all. And a little honey mustard for dipping.

A successful first run. I'm going to try salmon next.
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Jennifer
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Re: Food

Post by Jennifer » 03 Oct 2019, 19:14

Kroger's store-brand "Private selection" sourdough bread is really tasty.
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JasonL
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Re: Food

Post by JasonL » 03 Oct 2019, 22:07

The improvements in grocery bread are astonishing. La Brea is fucking good and sold at Kroger.

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JD
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Re: Food

Post by JD » 04 Oct 2019, 09:52

Wegman's bread selection is really good too. I have become a fan of their "tiger bread", and I can't wait to hit up the one in the Brooklyn Navy Yard.
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Warren
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Re: Food

Post by Warren » 04 Oct 2019, 10:35

JD wrote:
04 Oct 2019, 09:52
Wegman's bread selection is really good too. I have become a fan of their "tiger bread", and I can't wait to hit up the one in the Brooklyn Navy Yard.
Wegman's seeded rye is best rye bread.
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JasonL
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Re: Food

Post by JasonL » 04 Oct 2019, 10:41

My last batch of chili featured regular kroger dry kidney beans, which I don't normally use, and they were the thirstiest fcking things I've ever cooked with. I kept adding and adding liquid during a 4 hour cook and even after I was done and the chili was in the fridge the beans still kept drinking liquid. Crazy.

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Re: Food

Post by Warren » 04 Oct 2019, 11:10

JasonL wrote:
04 Oct 2019, 10:41
My last batch of chili featured regular kroger dry kidney beans, which I don't normally use, and they were the thirstiest fcking things I've ever cooked with. I kept adding and adding liquid during a 4 hour cook and even after I was done and the chili was in the fridge the beans still kept drinking liquid. Crazy.
You didn't hydrate the beans the night before? I always do.
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JasonL
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Re: Food

Post by JasonL » 04 Oct 2019, 11:13

Dude 12 hours pre cook salt water hydration.

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Warren
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Re: Food

Post by Warren » 04 Oct 2019, 11:24

whoa :o
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D.A. Ridgely
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Re: Food

Post by D.A. Ridgely » 04 Oct 2019, 18:58

I dispute the claim that Kroger bakery goods, including La Brea (which I do admit are an improvement over their prior offerings), are anything better than mediocre. For that matter, I've come to expect that recipes of national brand baked goods may be changed slightly for regional preference. We still get Pepperidge Farms white bread for the few things we use old-style sliced white bread for (grilled cheese sandwiches, etc.) and I could swear that the stuff we get in Texas is less firm and less dense than the same brand we used to get in Virginia.

One of my constant low-grade bitches in Dallas -- hey, maybe nicole is right, after all! -- is the dearth of decent bakeries and baked goods even in the upscale supermarkets. Central Market is okay on that count except they don't bake a regular Jewish rye, ferchristsakes! But I have to drive pretty much across town for a decent baguette, it's hard to find good sub rolls, etc.

Tl;dr -- I'd give Kroger at best a C- when it comes to baked goods.

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JasonL
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Re: Food

Post by JasonL » 04 Oct 2019, 20:16

This is the Starbucks makes terrible coffee argument. Compared to good coffee shops, sure. Compared to what used to be available in the great percentage of neighborhoods? It’s a huge improvement.

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D.A. Ridgely
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Re: Food

Post by D.A. Ridgely » 04 Oct 2019, 20:31

JasonL wrote:
04 Oct 2019, 20:16
This is the Starbucks makes terrible coffee argument. Compared to good coffee shops, sure. Compared to what used to be available in the great percentage of neighborhoods? It’s a huge improvement.
Well, yes, it is. But you guys were going on about how good Kroger's selection is, to which I invite you to Dallas -- hey, we'll put you up for the night -- and see if I'm not right. Safeway (Tom Thumb in Texas) used to have a pretty good baguette, but when it was sold it when straight downhill with spongy crust and preservatives that would may a Frenchman yell "Merde!" Is La Brea an improvement? Hell, yeah. Is it good bakery goods? No, not really.

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Re: Food

Post by Jennifer » 15 Oct 2019, 22:18

FINALLY the weather's cool enough that I can use the oven again, so I have a cauliflower cheese bake in there now.

Man, I'd forgotten that Alton Brown recipes tend to be a LOT more work than the ones from "Taste of Home"-brand cookbooks, or anything with "crock pot" in the title.
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JasonL
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Re: Food

Post by JasonL » 16 Oct 2019, 11:11

Jennifer wrote:
15 Oct 2019, 22:18
FINALLY the weather's cool enough that I can use the oven again, so I have a cauliflower cheese bake in there now.

Man, I'd forgotten that Alton Brown recipes tend to be a LOT more work than the ones from "Taste of Home"-brand cookbooks, or anything with "crock pot" in the title.
It is a sad truth of cookery - actual quality involves a sequence of events and cooking specific items to specific levels of doneness. You can obtain decent out of some kinds of very forgiving proteins in a model where everything goes in a pot of liquid at the same time and is insensitive to how long it cooks, but you can't get "great".

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JasonL
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Re: Food

Post by JasonL » 16 Oct 2019, 11:34

I did a green chicken chili the slow way with dried beans and whole chilies and having made my chicken stock in the instapot last weekend.

- making stock in volumes kind of freaks me out because of the amount of time it spends cooling at room temperature. I made stock in the morning then wanted to use it that same night but that was too long to leave it hot but not quite long enough to let it chill all the way so that was an annoying situation where i didn't want to leave the stock at room temp long enough for bacteria to find a home
- the instapot is a beast at making quality stocks - i've now done pho broth and chicken stock in terms of total cooking time compression. It's one hour under high pressure to fully gelatinized beef or chicken stock. For the cook. But here's the thing. To avoid boiling the stock and clouding it, you want to let the pressure go down naturally rather than by rapid vent. That's another hour in my experience even though many references suggest 20-30 minutes. Still it works well.
- I find myself frustrated with the variability in cooking time for dried beans even after they have been soaked. I used good beans from Rancho Gordo, but I still found hitting "just right" a bit difficult. I think the answer is to cook them longer and let the fast absorbing ones fall apart into the broth, but I really feel like nearly 2 hours after soaking for 1lb of beans should be adequate - and it is for 80% of the beans
- Peeling green chilies is still the worst. Char all over, seal to steam the skins loose, then peel. Except the peel doesn't come off uniformly or anything close to uniformly. It's a slow, tedious process even if you do it 'right'.
- if the focus is going to be chicken breasts, it is best to think about cooking them in a broth as a poaching effort. Put in the whole breasts, let them simmer over very low for like 15 minutes, use a thermometer, pull them out at like 150, remove to a plate and let carryover cooking get them another 6-7 degrees. Add back in at the end. Don't cook white meat to "flavor" the broth. That's not really a thing.
- If you want to add chicken flavor use a real broth with heavy chicken flavor in it or simmer bones wings etc. in the chili for the whole cook if using boxed

The results were good, but it was a lot of effort.

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Re: Food

Post by Warren » 16 Oct 2019, 12:02

JasonL wrote:
16 Oct 2019, 11:34
- making stock in volumes kind of freaks me out because of the amount of time it spends cooling at room temperature. I made stock in the morning then wanted to use it that same night but that was too long to leave it hot but not quite long enough to let it chill all the way so that was an annoying situation where i didn't want to leave the stock at room temp long enough for bacteria to find a home
I fill quart size plastic containers that I get with take-out Chinese soup, and put the lid on loosely while it cools. The lid keeps stuff from settling on it. And while it will draw in outside air as it cools, that is minimized by filling them up. Not too full though, as I freeze them and there needs to be enough space for the stock to expand as it freezes.
- the instapot is a beast at making quality stocks - i've now done pho broth and chicken stock in terms of total cooking time compression. It's one hour under high pressure to fully gelatinized beef or chicken stock. For the cook. But here's the thing. To avoid boiling the stock and clouding it, you want to let the pressure go down naturally rather than by rapid vent. That's another hour in my experience even though many references suggest 20-30 minutes. Still it works well.
One hour? Damn that's sweet. I personally don't care if my stock is cloudy. In addition to the quart containers, I always fill a few ice cube trays and freeze them. Dropping a cube or two in the pan during de-glazing is an awesome and convenient sauce technique.
- Peeling green chilies is still the worst. Char all over, seal to steam the skins loose, then peel. Except the peel doesn't come off uniformly or anything close to uniformly. It's a slow, tedious process even if you do it 'right'.
Ditto. I do it in batches and refrigerate. The roasted chilies give up liquid in the refrigerator. I'll inevitably just pour that into whatever I'm cooking. Sometimes I'll just pour the liquid into eggs without dicing up any chilies.
- if the focus is going to be chicken breasts, it is best to think about cooking them in a broth as a poaching effort. Put in the whole breasts, let them simmer over very low for like 15 minutes, use a thermometer, pull them out at like 150, remove to a plate and let carryover cooking get them another 6-7 degrees. Add back in at the end. Don't cook white meat to "flavor" the broth. That's not really a thing.
Check. Though my technique is to cut the breasts into chunks and simmer in salt water. Then remove to cutting mat, shred if desired, and coat with chili powder, cumin, etc. and add to pot/skillet.
- If you want to add chicken flavor use a real broth with heavy chicken flavor in it or simmer bones wings etc. in the chili for the whole cook if using boxed
Check, but Better Than Bullion is also acceptable.
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Jennifer
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Re: Food

Post by Jennifer » 16 Oct 2019, 13:14

JasonL wrote:
16 Oct 2019, 11:11
Jennifer wrote:
15 Oct 2019, 22:18
FINALLY the weather's cool enough that I can use the oven again, so I have a cauliflower cheese bake in there now.

Man, I'd forgotten that Alton Brown recipes tend to be a LOT more work than the ones from "Taste of Home"-brand cookbooks, or anything with "crock pot" in the title.
It is a sad truth of cookery - actual quality involves a sequence of events and cooking specific items to specific levels of doneness. You can obtain decent out of some kinds of very forgiving proteins in a model where everything goes in a pot of liquid at the same time and is insensitive to how long it cooks, but you can't get "great".
True. But, regarding my specific complaint, I think it's more that Brown's recipes tend to be cooking "from scratch" -- with the exception of those recipes which include steps like "chill in the fridge overnight" or other modern-tech-required bits, most of his recipes are things that could have been made identically 200 years ago, by anyone rich enough to get all the ingredients and spices. But the "Taste of Home" recipes, and most recipes designed for crock-pots/slow cookers, are far more likely to use modern "convenience" ingredients which did not exist until a couple generations ago -- last night I also broke in my new crock-pot to make a pork-and-potatoes recipe which among other ingredients called for a can of condensed cream-of-something soup. I can't recall any Alton Brown recipes using canned processed soup as an ingredient. (For that matter, I cut corners with Brown's cauliflower bake last night: the cookbook, and that episode of Brown's show, call for removing the curds from an actual raw head of cauliflower; I instead used bags of frozen "riced" cauliflower -- another food staple for which I am pleased to note Kroger has a perfectly cromulent store-brand version.)
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Warren
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Re: Food

Post by Warren » 16 Oct 2019, 13:52

Alton calls for scratch ingredients when you can get better results that way, but he has no hesitation in calling for box/canned if that's the way to go. For instance he says, Make your own buttercream icing, but make the cake from a box as you'll get better results and it's a hell of a lot easier.
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Jennifer
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Re: Food

Post by Jennifer » 16 Oct 2019, 13:57

Warren wrote:
16 Oct 2019, 13:52
Alton calls for scratch ingredients when you can get better results that way, but he has no hesitation in calling for box/canned if that's the way to go. For instance he says, Make your own buttercream icing, but make the cake from a box as you'll get better results and it's a hell of a lot easier.
True dat, though I tend not to make desserts anyway which is likely why I forgot about that. Regarding his "actual meal" recipes, though, I don't recall any using canned condensed soup, or even things like envelopes of onion-soup or ranch-dip powder mix (two other "convenience ingredients" Jeff and I'll often use in our own cooking).
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JasonL
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Re: Food

Post by JasonL » 16 Oct 2019, 13:58

Yeah we are different animals in this regard as well as all the others we already know about. I run in terror from recipes suggesting canned cream soups as ingredients. My thing is to learn as deeply as I can about the best version of from scratch, then make only the compromises I want to make to condense time. Boxed chicken stock is an example of a tremendous time saver over fully scratch stocks even though the latter are undeniably better. My recent testing with pressure cooking has been to see if I can get real stocks to a manageable enough process I don't feel like I have to use boxed all the time.

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Re: Food

Post by Warren » 16 Oct 2019, 14:00

I have no compunction using canned cream of mushroom soup for Green Bean Casserole, Forgotten Chicken, Crock Pot Chicken and Dumplings (which uses Pillsbury biscuits for the dumplings), and possibly a few other things.
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Highway
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Re: Food

Post by Highway » 16 Oct 2019, 14:07

We actually make-from-scratch a version of cream of mushroom soup for use in recipes that call for it (which is only a couple that we use). The recipe for that takes into account the consistency and water content of condensed soup so that it's a direct replacement, but nowhere near as salty and a lot more flavorful.
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Re: Food

Post by Warren » 16 Oct 2019, 14:11

Highway wrote:
16 Oct 2019, 14:07
We actually make-from-scratch a version of cream of mushroom soup for use in recipes that call for it (which is only a couple that we use). The recipe for that takes into account the consistency and water content of condensed soup so that it's a direct replacement, but nowhere near as salty and a lot more flavorful.
I buy low sodium versions when I can, and adjust for salt in elsewhere in the dish. I also like to add fresh mushrooms (either creminis or shiitakes) to boost flavor.
Not that I doubt your version is superior.
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