Food

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JasonL
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Re: Food

Post by JasonL » 29 Nov 2018, 22:19

Mo wrote:
Warren wrote:
19 Nov 2018, 16:44
Mo wrote:
19 Nov 2018, 12:25
This is good.

https://www.thrillist.com/eat/portland/ ... rger-quest#
It reveals a lot at any rate.
Nothing ruins a good thing like success, I've often said so.
As for the particulars, I bristled at this:
I can’t pretend that the stuff I noticed when I first walked in, the, ugh, authenticity of the place didn't help push it to the top of the list.
In culinary matters, authenticity is more often than not to be avoided like the plague. This case in particular, the author seems to be saying that having eaten so much really good food, he was grateful for some cheap crap for a change.
The whole notion that a good independently owned restaurant can remain open serving the same fare to the same community year after year, decade after decade, is misguided. What's true of small business in general goes double for restaurants: Grow or die. Being "too popular" is an oxymoron.
Nate Silver looked at the Yelp reviews from before the place got popular and the complaints were largely the same. So it seems like the review did not cause the decline so much as it magnified the exiting problems to a level that became untenable.
Underappreciated outside the halls of deep capitalism- scale is a force unto itself with its own effects.

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Warren
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Re: Food

Post by Warren » 30 Nov 2018, 11:11

JasonL wrote:
29 Nov 2018, 22:19
Mo wrote:
Warren wrote:
19 Nov 2018, 16:44
Mo wrote:
19 Nov 2018, 12:25
This is good.

https://www.thrillist.com/eat/portland/ ... rger-quest#
It reveals a lot at any rate.
Nothing ruins a good thing like success, I've often said so.
As for the particulars, I bristled at this:
I can’t pretend that the stuff I noticed when I first walked in, the, ugh, authenticity of the place didn't help push it to the top of the list.
In culinary matters, authenticity is more often than not to be avoided like the plague. This case in particular, the author seems to be saying that having eaten so much really good food, he was grateful for some cheap crap for a change.
The whole notion that a good independently owned restaurant can remain open serving the same fare to the same community year after year, decade after decade, is misguided. What's true of small business in general goes double for restaurants: Grow or die. Being "too popular" is an oxymoron.
Nate Silver looked at the Yelp reviews from before the place got popular and the complaints were largely the same. So it seems like the review did not cause the decline so much as it magnified the exiting problems to a level that became untenable.
Underappreciated outside the halls of deep capitalism- scale is a force unto itself with its own effects.
Yes, but here's the thing. It's not a force for good.
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Warren
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Re: Food

Post by Warren » 30 Nov 2018, 11:12

Andrew wrote:
29 Nov 2018, 21:48
Do not purchase Organic Valley sharp cheddar cheese unless you want a cheese that tastes like a cow smells.
I do not. Thanks for the tip.
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JasonL
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Re: Food

Post by JasonL » 30 Nov 2018, 11:59

Warren wrote:
30 Nov 2018, 11:11
JasonL wrote:
29 Nov 2018, 22:19
Mo wrote:
Warren wrote:
19 Nov 2018, 16:44
Mo wrote:
19 Nov 2018, 12:25
This is good.

https://www.thrillist.com/eat/portland/ ... rger-quest#
It reveals a lot at any rate.
Nothing ruins a good thing like success, I've often said so.
As for the particulars, I bristled at this:
I can’t pretend that the stuff I noticed when I first walked in, the, ugh, authenticity of the place didn't help push it to the top of the list.
In culinary matters, authenticity is more often than not to be avoided like the plague. This case in particular, the author seems to be saying that having eaten so much really good food, he was grateful for some cheap crap for a change.
The whole notion that a good independently owned restaurant can remain open serving the same fare to the same community year after year, decade after decade, is misguided. What's true of small business in general goes double for restaurants: Grow or die. Being "too popular" is an oxymoron.
Nate Silver looked at the Yelp reviews from before the place got popular and the complaints were largely the same. So it seems like the review did not cause the decline so much as it magnified the exiting problems to a level that became untenable.
Underappreciated outside the halls of deep capitalism- scale is a force unto itself with its own effects.
Yes, but here's the thing. It's not a force for good.
You would not want to live in a world where economies of scale weren't broadly functioning. To a first order approximation it's the difference between impoverishment and modernity.

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Warren
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Re: Food

Post by Warren » 30 Nov 2018, 12:03

JasonL wrote:
30 Nov 2018, 11:59
You would not want to live in a world where economies of scale weren't broadly functioning. To a first order approximation it's the difference between impoverishment and modernity.
No of course not. I'm just saying that scale is like power. It can be used for good or evil and comes with great responsibility.
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JasonL
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Re: Food

Post by JasonL » 02 Dec 2018, 09:28

Made chicken with mushroom broth last night. First time I've tried to really make the mushroom broth the thing. It's actually kinda hard to make a soup quantity of mushroom broth with rich flavor because the dried shrooms drink so much liquid yet you need a lot of them to get something flavorful. 60 grams of dried mushrooms along with chicken legs and thighs, carrots and onions, lemon peel and rosemary to a quart of chicken stock plus 2 cups wine and 2 cups water only yielded a bit less than a quart of stock.

Tasted but discarded the rehydrated shrooms after the stock was done. Shredded chicken and sauteed ALL THE FUNGUS IN THE WORLD separately in garlic infused butter/evo mix: the big trumpets, oyster, enoki, shimeji, and shiitake. Put pile of chicken and pile of shrooms in a bowl, ladle broth over and sprinkle tarragon and parsley on top.

The wife loved that dish. Drank a beautiful funky Wind Gap pinot. A better pairing for a burgundy style pinot I don't know that I've had in a while.

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Jasper
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Re: Food

Post by Jasper » 03 Dec 2018, 12:11

I made a version of zurek, Polish sour rye soup, yesterday that came out pretty well. Began the zur, or zakwas, or sour, on Tuesday.

Mmmmm.... fermenty rye smell.....

In reviewing a bunch of recipes online to use as guidance, it looks like Poland (and perhaps other eastern-bloc nations) have an equivalent to the French mirepoix, that uses carrot, parsnip, celeriac, and leeks, as the common base for veg broth. The leeks available here are expensive af, so I used a white onion and chucked a handful of scallion greens in as a substitute.
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dead_elvis
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Re: Food

Post by dead_elvis » 08 Dec 2018, 21:38

Ok, this is super embarrassing, but we have a cut of meat we have completely forgotten what it is, or even which kind of animal its from because we've bought both beef and pork for the freezer. Unlike all the other cuts, the butcher wrap in in paper with the part name stamped on it. I know its a long shot because its hard to get a good pic with the plastic its in. For whatever reason the butcher cut it in thirds even though its not that big. Does this look familiar to anyone?
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Warren
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Re: Food

Post by Warren » 09 Dec 2018, 01:20

Here's what you do. Thaw it out. Pound it with a meat tenderizer Season liberally with salt and pepper. Dip it in egg wash. Dredge in flour + paprika + a pinch of cayenne pepper. Fry in oil over med-high heat. Serve with gravy.
Doesn't matter what it was going it, it comes out the same.
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JasonL
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Re: Food

Post by JasonL » 09 Dec 2018, 09:38

Is that a pork or veal shank cross cut? Like osso buco style?

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Warren
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Re: Food

Post by Warren » 09 Dec 2018, 10:03

JasonL wrote:
09 Dec 2018, 09:38
Is that a pork or veal shank cross cut? Like osso buco style?
Oh wait, there's bones in there? Well for something that small it almost has to be lamb.
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thoreau
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Re: Food

Post by thoreau » 10 Dec 2018, 01:39

As a practice run for Christmas I butterflied a turkey. It cooked very fast, so I accidentally overcooked it a bit, but that's why we do the practice run.

I cut out the backbone and put the bone and associated meat into a pot with a bunch of vegetable stock that I had lying around. I reduced the liquid by half and had something that was almost gravy-like on its own. When combined with the pan drippings I barely had to add anything to thicken it.

In lieu of stuffing I plan to make a savory bread pudding.
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Warren
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Re: Food

Post by Warren » 10 Dec 2018, 09:50

thoreau wrote:
10 Dec 2018, 01:39
In lieu of stuffing I plan to make a savory bread pudding.
Which differs from stuffing how?
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thoreau
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Re: Food

Post by thoreau » 10 Dec 2018, 10:43

Warren wrote:
thoreau wrote:
10 Dec 2018, 01:39
In lieu of stuffing I plan to make a savory bread pudding.
Which differs from stuffing how?
Far more eggs and lots of cream.
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Number 6
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Re: Food

Post by Number 6 » 12 Dec 2018, 18:30

I have a rotisserie chicken and have decided to use the carcass to make stock. Any tips? (Looks at Warren).
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Jadagul
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Re: Food

Post by Jadagul » 12 Dec 2018, 20:22

Number 6 wrote:
12 Dec 2018, 18:30
I have a rotisserie chicken and have decided to use the carcass to make stock. Any tips? (Looks at Warren).
Stock Is pretty straightforward. Put the carcass in a pot. I'd add, like, an onion sliced in half, and any other veggie trimmings you have lying around. Simmer for like eight hours. (Try to keep it from actually boiling---if it smells good, that's good-smell that isn't actually in the stock any more). Jar it, wait for it to cool, stick it in the fridge til you're ready to use it.

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Re: Food

Post by Warren » 12 Dec 2018, 23:57

Jadagul wrote:
12 Dec 2018, 20:22
Number 6 wrote:
12 Dec 2018, 18:30
I have a rotisserie chicken and have decided to use the carcass to make stock. Any tips? (Looks at Warren).
Stock Is pretty straightforward. Put the carcass in a pot with two quarts of water. I'd add, like, half an onion sliced in half, and any other veggie trimmings you have lying around two carrots + two stalks of celery, broken, and half a teaspoon of table salt. Simmer for like eight hours. (Try to keep it from actually boiling---if it smells good, that's good-smell that isn't actually in the stock any more). Strain it, Jar it, wait for it to cool, stick it in the fridge til you're ready to use it.
Fixed. The simmer but not boiling is important. So is the 8 hours. If the pot gets too low you can add water a little at a time, you want to wind up with 4-6 cups of stock. Also, one carcass isn't very much for stock, if you can throw in a few uncooked wings it will help a lot.

EDIT
Optional additions: half a dozen black peppercorns, 2-4 cloves garlic, a bay leaf, parsley, thyme.
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Jasper
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Re: Food

Post by Jasper » 13 Dec 2018, 13:33

Warren wrote:
12 Dec 2018, 23:57
Jadagul wrote:
12 Dec 2018, 20:22
Number 6 wrote:
12 Dec 2018, 18:30
I have a rotisserie chicken and have decided to use the carcass to make stock. Any tips? (Looks at Warren).
Stock Is pretty straightforward. Put the carcass in a pot with two quarts of water. I'd add, like, half an onion sliced in half, and any other veggie trimmings you have lying around two carrots + two stalks of celery, broken, and half a teaspoon of table salt. Simmer for like eight hours. (Try to keep it from actually boiling---if it smells good, that's good-smell that isn't actually in the stock any more). Strain it, Jar it, wait for it to cool, stick it in the fridge til you're ready to use it.
Fixed. The simmer but not boiling is important. So is the 8 hours. If the pot gets too low you can add water a little at a time, you want to wind up with 4-6 cups of stock. Also, one carcass isn't very much for stock, if you can throw in a few uncooked wings it will help a lot.

EDIT
Optional Necessary additions: half a dozen black peppercorns, 2-4 cloves garlic, a bay leaf, parsley, thyme.
Fixed. If you're going through with the ordeal, might as well do it right.
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Jennifer
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Re: Food

Post by Jennifer » 22 Dec 2018, 18:55

Inspired by a side dish offered at MANY MANY "deep south" restaurants (especially barbecue joints), I tried making "pimento mac and cheese" -- basically the same Piccadilly Cafeteria-knockoff baked mac-n-cheese recipe I've made for years, only using pimento cheese rather than sharp shredded cheddar for the sauce. I found the results very disappointing -- had I not made it myself or seen it made, I'd've figured it was regular baked mac-n-cheese while wondering what those red flecks in it were. Possibly even a bit less flavorful (blander) than my regular mac-and-cheese dish. Jeff liked it, but IMO it's not worth the price premium for using pimento cheese rather than sharp cheddar.
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Jasper
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Re: Food

Post by Jasper » 26 Dec 2018, 14:29

You can always use your favorite mac-n-cheese recipe and jut throw in a bunch of diced, blanched, peppers of suitable hotness.
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JasonL
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Re: Food

Post by JasonL » 26 Dec 2018, 14:43

I'm on team "pimento cheese is overrated by southern type people".

Yeah - take a can of diced green chilies and add those, add a blend of red bells and jalapenos, that kind of thing seems like it would be way better.

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dhex
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Re: Food

Post by dhex » 26 Dec 2018, 18:36

Pimento belongs in olives.

Also most southern Mac and cheese is fucking awful. Awful. I will take them to the mat with my own which I will dub Sherman-roni and cheese.
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Jennifer
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Re: Food

Post by Jennifer » 26 Dec 2018, 18:54

JasonL wrote:
26 Dec 2018, 14:43
I'm on team "pimento cheese is overrated by southern type people".
I first tried pimento cheese at a hot dog restaurant in the hipster part of Chattanooga--I forget what "my" dog was called or what other toppings it had, but pimento cheese was the main one and I really liked the results. Jeff also reports that the grilled cheese sandwich he made with the pimento left over after my mac and cheese experiment was really good. But when melted into a white sauce and then baked into a mac and cheese, it loses even more of its flavor than regular sharp cheddar (which always loses its sharpness and becomes much mellower by the time the baked mac and cheese is done.)
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Jasper
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Re: Food

Post by Jasper » 27 Dec 2018, 13:04

If'n you want to maintain that sharpness for mac-n-cheese, try throwing in a little Gorgonzola or other bleu.
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Warren
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Re: Food

Post by Warren » 27 Dec 2018, 15:12

Jasper wrote:
27 Dec 2018, 13:04
If'n you want to maintain that sharpness for mac-n-cheese, try throwing in a little Gorgonzola or other bleu.
pungent /= sharp
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