Food

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JasonL
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Re: Food

Post by JasonL » 06 Mar 2018, 15:55

You are spelling "chicken breast" wrong. Salted slow roasted pork shoulder - try it and get back to me. Don't make any of the sauces at first just do salt and pepper and 250 for like 6 hours. They say 9 but I've never needed 9. It's as flavorful as any kind of meat with salt on it you care to point to.

Usually what's happening is pork is drastically tragically overcooked. This is a long cook but it's a shoulder. Do not try with tenderloin or chops.

https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/201 ... ecipe.html

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lunchstealer
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Re: Food

Post by lunchstealer » 06 Mar 2018, 18:53

I don't put sauces on pork chops unless they need moisture.

I put a rub on a pork loin roast, but it doesn't penetrate, and I also put a rub on a standing rib roast. I'm more likely to put a sauce on a beef roast than a pork roast, but that may just be me.

Properly done, pork barbecue doesn't need sauce, although it will pick up a fair amount of flavor from the smoke. But not all.
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lunchstealer
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Re: Food

Post by lunchstealer » 06 Mar 2018, 18:55

JasonL wrote:
06 Mar 2018, 15:55

Usually what's happening is pork is drastically tragically overcooked. This is a long cook but it's a shoulder. Do not try with tenderloin or chops.
I actually aim for medium-to-medium-well with pork loin these days, although I haven't really convinced mrs lunch that that's really safe. But trichinosis isn't really a thing in American pork anymore. I haven't tried it with pork chops because I don't really end up making it, but the rules should apply.
"The constitution is more of a BDSM agreement with a safe word." - Sandy

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JasonL
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Re: Food

Post by JasonL » 06 Mar 2018, 20:39

I like my pork about 145 in the sous vide.

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Jadagul
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Re: Food

Post by Jadagul » 06 Mar 2018, 23:26

lunchstealer wrote:
06 Mar 2018, 18:55
JasonL wrote:
06 Mar 2018, 15:55

Usually what's happening is pork is drastically tragically overcooked. This is a long cook but it's a shoulder. Do not try with tenderloin or chops.
I actually aim for medium-to-medium-well with pork loin these days, although I haven't really convinced mrs lunch that that's really safe. But trichinosis isn't really a thing in American pork anymore. I haven't tried it with pork chops because I don't really end up making it, but the rules should apply.
Yes, that is the "tragically overcooked" that Jason was talking about.

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Jasper
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Re: Food

Post by Jasper » 07 Mar 2018, 12:24

To be fair to Jennifer, a lot of today's super-lean pork you find at the grocery store is kinda bad. Especially loin roasts. America's war on fatty meat was a tragedy. You really need to get the larger cuts like the shoulder or butt or fresh ham, with decent fat content, in order to do a minimal seasoning low & slow to good effect.
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Andrew
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Re: Food

Post by Andrew » 07 Mar 2018, 13:14

Recent chili batches with ingredients, proportions, and cooking time all otherwise constant:

1. 6 serrano peppers. Nice heat and flavor, but not quite enough.
2. 8 serrano peppers. More mild than first batch.
3. 6 serrano peppers and 3 habaneros. Somehow more mild than second batch.

Wtf. I understand natural variation is a thing in peppers, but c'mon. With my luck, I'll step it up again for batch 4, and that's when I'll hit some real ones.
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JasonL
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Re: Food

Post by JasonL » 07 Mar 2018, 14:05

Do you do seeds and ribs included or do you take them out? My experience is seeds in is pretty consistent but if you pull the seeds you get a range of mild to nothing.

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Andrew
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Re: Food

Post by Andrew » 07 Mar 2018, 14:07

JasonL wrote:
07 Mar 2018, 14:05
Do you do seeds and ribs included or do you take them out? My experience is seeds in is pretty consistent but if you pull the seeds you get a range of mild to nothing.
Seeds and ribs included.
We live in the fucked age. Get used to it. - dhex

holy shit there will never be an end until the sweet release of death (as dictated by the death panels, natch) - lunch

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JasonL
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Re: Food

Post by JasonL » 07 Mar 2018, 14:17

My usual chili mix is:

4 ancho + 3 pasilla or 3 guajillo providing minimal to no heat
2 arbol / japones simmered whole in the pot for mild heat
2 chipotle + 1tbsp adobo or 2-3 serrano for medium/high heat
Secret Weapon - 1tbsp plus a bit aji amarillo paste - medium heat
After 2 hours test and if more heat needed add either another serrano or vinegar based hot sauce like franks or cholula to get desired heat

Cook another hour after that.

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Kwix
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Re: Food

Post by Kwix » 07 Mar 2018, 17:42

Jennifer wrote:
06 Mar 2018, 15:26
...you should've known to expect blandness from an unadulterated Betty Crocker recipe.
Speaking of, B.C. (or maybe Better Homes & Gardens) Chicken Paprikash.
Double the 3tsp paprika to 6tsp and substitute some or maybe all with smoked Spanish, add garlic, halve the sour cream.
Sliced mushrooms may not be traditional but I like them (makes it somewhat similar to Hungarian Mushroom soup).
"pedialyte is like planned parenthood for hangovers. it costs you a bit, but it makes your little problem go away until the next time you drink too much."-- dhex
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Kwix
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Re: Food

Post by Kwix » 07 Mar 2018, 17:52

lunchstealer wrote:
06 Mar 2018, 18:55
JasonL wrote:
06 Mar 2018, 15:55

Usually what's happening is pork is drastically tragically overcooked. This is a long cook but it's a shoulder. Do not try with tenderloin or chops.
I actually aim for medium-to-medium-well with pork loin these days, although I haven't really convinced mrs lunch that that's really safe. But trichinosis isn't really a thing in American pork anymore. I haven't tried it with pork chops because I don't really end up making it, but the rules should apply.
Trichinella is killed at 137F. There has never been a need for shoe leather chops.
I concur with Jasper that modern pork is way too lean. Gone are the days of well marbled chops unless your wallet is fat.
"pedialyte is like planned parenthood for hangovers. it costs you a bit, but it makes your little problem go away until the next time you drink too much."-- dhex
"Sweet tea is the archvillain in Wilford Brimley's origin story." -- Ellie

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Jennifer
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Re: Food

Post by Jennifer » 07 Mar 2018, 17:58

Kwix wrote:
07 Mar 2018, 17:42
Jennifer wrote:
06 Mar 2018, 15:26
...you should've known to expect blandness from an unadulterated Betty Crocker recipe.
Speaking of, B.C. (or maybe Better Homes & Gardens) Chicken Paprikash.
Double the 3tsp paprika to 6tsp and substitute some or maybe all with smoked Spanish, add garlic, halve the sour cream.
Sliced mushrooms may not be traditional but I like them (makes it somewhat similar to Hungarian Mushroom soup).
They recommend three whole tablespoons of paprikash? Ha! Sounds like they've improved. Here's a comment/complaint I made here once before:

viewtopic.php?f=7&t=1983&p=253767&hilit ... sh#p253767
Jennifer wrote:I have a 1981 paperback edition of the red-and-white-checked Better Homes and Gardens cookbook with a recipe for chicken paprikash: for three pounds of chicken, plus one cup of sauce containing sour cream, chicken broth and dry wine and an unspecified amount of egg noodles to pour the chicken-and-sauce combo over, it calls for only one tablespoon of paprika. For a recipe whose very name suggests that paprika is supposed to be a dominant if not the dominant flavor. (Jeff and I have since developed our own recipe which, for the same amount of chicken and sauce, starts with at least a quarter-cup of paprika and we sometimes add more if we think the flavor's too weak.)
"Myself, despite what they say about libertarians, I think we're actually allowed to pursue options beyond futility or sucking the dicks of the powerful." -- Eric the .5b

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Kwix
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Re: Food

Post by Kwix » 07 Mar 2018, 18:27

Jennifer wrote:
07 Mar 2018, 17:58
Kwix wrote:
07 Mar 2018, 17:42
Jennifer wrote:
06 Mar 2018, 15:26
...you should've known to expect blandness from an unadulterated Betty Crocker recipe.
Speaking of, B.C. (or maybe Better Homes & Gardens) Chicken Paprikash.
Double the 3tsp paprika to 6tsp and substitute some or maybe all with smoked Spanish, add garlic, halve the sour cream.
Sliced mushrooms may not be traditional but I like them (makes it somewhat similar to Hungarian Mushroom soup).
They recommend three whole tablespoons of paprikash? Ha! Sounds like they've improved. Here's a comment/complaint I made here once before:

viewtopic.php?f=7&t=1983&p=253767&hilit ... sh#p253767
Jennifer wrote:I have a 1981 paperback edition of the red-and-white-checked Better Homes and Gardens cookbook with a recipe for chicken paprikash: for three pounds of chicken, plus one cup of sauce containing sour cream, chicken broth and dry wine and an unspecified amount of egg noodles to pour the chicken-and-sauce combo over, it calls for only one tablespoon of paprika. For a recipe whose very name suggests that paprika is supposed to be a dominant if not the dominant flavor. (Jeff and I have since developed our own recipe which, for the same amount of chicken and sauce, starts with at least a quarter-cup of paprika and we sometimes add more if we think the flavor's too weak.)
No, no. 3tsp = 1Tbsp. Same recipe.
Also, how in the hell do you keep straight when/where you have posted crap on the Gryll? I'm lucky to remember my own name!
"pedialyte is like planned parenthood for hangovers. it costs you a bit, but it makes your little problem go away until the next time you drink too much."-- dhex
"Sweet tea is the archvillain in Wilford Brimley's origin story." -- Ellie

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Jennifer
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Re: Food

Post by Jennifer » 07 Mar 2018, 18:53

Kwix wrote:
07 Mar 2018, 18:27
Jennifer wrote:
07 Mar 2018, 17:58
Kwix wrote:
07 Mar 2018, 17:42
Jennifer wrote:
06 Mar 2018, 15:26
...you should've known to expect blandness from an unadulterated Betty Crocker recipe.
Speaking of, B.C. (or maybe Better Homes & Gardens) Chicken Paprikash.
Double the 3tsp paprika to 6tsp and substitute some or maybe all with smoked Spanish, add garlic, halve the sour cream.
Sliced mushrooms may not be traditional but I like them (makes it somewhat similar to Hungarian Mushroom soup).
They recommend three whole tablespoons of paprikash? Ha! Sounds like they've improved. Here's a comment/complaint I made here once before:

viewtopic.php?f=7&t=1983&p=253767&hilit ... sh#p253767
Jennifer wrote:I have a 1981 paperback edition of the red-and-white-checked Better Homes and Gardens cookbook with a recipe for chicken paprikash: for three pounds of chicken, plus one cup of sauce containing sour cream, chicken broth and dry wine and an unspecified amount of egg noodles to pour the chicken-and-sauce combo over, it calls for only one tablespoon of paprika. For a recipe whose very name suggests that paprika is supposed to be a dominant if not the dominant flavor. (Jeff and I have since developed our own recipe which, for the same amount of chicken and sauce, starts with at least a quarter-cup of paprika and we sometimes add more if we think the flavor's too weak.)
No, no. 3tsp = 1Tbsp. Same recipe.
Also, how in the hell do you keep straight when/where you have posted crap on the Gryll? I'm lucky to remember my own name!
In this case, I remembered mentioning the remarkably un-paprika-ish paprikash, and so I typed "paprikash" into the site's search box.
"Myself, despite what they say about libertarians, I think we're actually allowed to pursue options beyond futility or sucking the dicks of the powerful." -- Eric the .5b

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Jennifer
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Re: Food

Post by Jennifer » 12 Mar 2018, 15:49

I tried a recipe for "carrot, cumin and kidney bean soup" from a British frugal-cooking blog I recently discovered. (I don't really like cooked carrots, or the texture of cooked veggies in general, and am distinctly meh on kidney beans too, but I also understand that I really need to eat more vegetables for health reasons, so I'm hoping maybe I can "trick" myself into eating them via heavily spiced and pureed soups.)

The one change I made to the recipe was adding a considerable amount of salt. [EDIT: Also I used a can of vegetable broth, rather than a bouillon cube in hot water.] I also think I used more cumin than the recipe strictly calls for. The photo on the blog shows the soup being a cheerful yellow-orange color, whereas my soup ended up a dirty, shitty shade of brown. (Perhaps because I used "dark red" kidney beans, and maybe she used some paler shade?) Still, the results were not bad -- this particular recipe is not one I expect I'll be repeating, but the taste and texture of a soup with pureed beans in the broth is worth repeating. Only instead of carrots, I'll add some other veggie that isn't so sweet. (The soup I made wasn't really "spicy" or "cumin-y" at all, really. though neither did it really taste like carrots--I doubt I could've identified that ingredient in a blind taste test.)
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JasonL
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Re: Food

Post by JasonL » 12 Mar 2018, 16:14

I don’t see anything in the ingredients that would produce quite that shade of yellow. Certainly not different type of red kidney. Maybe 1/4 tsp turmeric ...

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Kwix
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Re: Food

Post by Kwix » 12 Mar 2018, 17:27

Jennifer wrote:
12 Mar 2018, 15:49
The photo on the blog shows the soup being a cheerful yellow-orange color, whereas my soup ended up a dirty, shitty shade of brown. (Perhaps because I used "dark red" kidney beans, and maybe she used some paler shade?)
Someone further in the comments mentioned the same issue and I concur with Jason. That pic is of either a pure carrot soup or more likely a squash soup possibly enhanced with turmeric or curry powder.
Along those lines, try a squash and lentil soup. Same idea, better flavors.
https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food ... oup-351416
or a simple pureed version using red lentils for better color:
https://simple-veganista.com/2014/11/bu ... -soup.html
"pedialyte is like planned parenthood for hangovers. it costs you a bit, but it makes your little problem go away until the next time you drink too much."-- dhex
"Sweet tea is the archvillain in Wilford Brimley's origin story." -- Ellie

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Jennifer
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Re: Food

Post by Jennifer » 17 Mar 2018, 22:57

I tried some of the leftover carrot and bean soup, only with a LOT of added pepper. But it didn't work; the carrot flavor was FAR more pronounced the second time, even with all the added pepper. Which would be great for someone who really likes the taste of cooked carrot, but I generally do not, so I admitted defeat and dumped the remaining soup down the disposal. I'll try more pureed-veggie soups in future, but scratch carrot off the list.
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Re: Food

Post by Warren » 25 Mar 2018, 17:40

I'm always complaining about coleslaw. It's inevitably too goopy, sweet, and/or sour.

Had half a head of cabbage left over from St. Patty day. Combined with a bag of pre-shredded broccoli-slaw, and a packet of McCormick super slaw.
Added mayonnaise, sugar, and vinegar to my own taste.
BAM!
THIS SPACE FOR RENT

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Jennifer
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Re: Food

Post by Jennifer » 05 Apr 2018, 17:26

There's a baked-chicken recipe I make where the chicken pieces are frequently basted with a sauce of melted butter, vinegar, mustard, salt, pepper and paprika. But, for all the gorgeous red color the paprika makes the sauce when I start baking, by the end the paprika is burnt black, and I'm not convinced it adds anything good to the flavor under that circumstance. So I'm wondering, does anyone have a recommendation for a paprika substitute, in this recipe?
"Myself, despite what they say about libertarians, I think we're actually allowed to pursue options beyond futility or sucking the dicks of the powerful." -- Eric the .5b

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Kwix
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Re: Food

Post by Kwix » 05 Apr 2018, 18:52

Jennifer wrote:
05 Apr 2018, 17:26
There's a baked-chicken recipe I make where the chicken pieces are frequently basted with a sauce of melted butter, vinegar, mustard, salt, pepper and paprika. But, for all the gorgeous red color the paprika makes the sauce when I start baking, by the end the paprika is burnt black, and I'm not convinced it adds anything good to the flavor under that circumstance. So I'm wondering, does anyone have a recommendation for a paprika substitute, in this recipe?
Hmm. With it blackening I'm presuming that the chicken is baked uncovered? If that's the case try making a "paprika butter" the day before. Melt the butter you intend on using in the recipe and the paprika in a saucepan over low heat. Let it lightly simmer for a few minutes (not enough to start turning the paprika dark). Then turn it off, cover it and let it slowly cool. The flavor (and color) of the paprika will infuse into the butter. You can then reheat the solidified butter and either decant or strain it so there are no paprika solids. If you want the "bright red" color dash some paprika onto the chicken at your last baste. The same technique is used for chili oil and I use it for fresh garlic butter as well, letting the garlic cook just a bit.
"pedialyte is like planned parenthood for hangovers. it costs you a bit, but it makes your little problem go away until the next time you drink too much."-- dhex
"Sweet tea is the archvillain in Wilford Brimley's origin story." -- Ellie

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Jennifer
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Re: Food

Post by Jennifer » 05 Apr 2018, 19:00

Kwix wrote:
05 Apr 2018, 18:52
Jennifer wrote:
05 Apr 2018, 17:26
There's a baked-chicken recipe I make where the chicken pieces are frequently basted with a sauce of melted butter, vinegar, mustard, salt, pepper and paprika. But, for all the gorgeous red color the paprika makes the sauce when I start baking, by the end the paprika is burnt black, and I'm not convinced it adds anything good to the flavor under that circumstance. So I'm wondering, does anyone have a recommendation for a paprika substitute, in this recipe?
Hmm. With it blackening I'm presuming that the chicken is baked uncovered? If that's the case try making a "paprika butter" the day before. Melt the butter you intend on using in the recipe and the paprika in a saucepan over low heat. Let it lightly simmer for a few minutes (not enough to start turning the paprika dark). Then turn it off, cover it and let it slowly cool. The flavor (and color) of the paprika will infuse into the butter. You can then reheat the solidified butter and either decant or strain it so there are no paprika solids. If you want the "bright red" color dash some paprika onto the chicken at your last baste. The same technique is used for chili oil and I use it for fresh garlic butter as well, letting the garlic cook just a bit.
Hmm, interesting! But to clarify: I don't care so much whether the paprika bits in the sauce are red or black; my concern is that, if the blackening means the paprika actually burned, that might ruin the flavor or just be a waste of paprika. Next time I make chicken I'll experiment by making "paprika butter" first.
"Myself, despite what they say about libertarians, I think we're actually allowed to pursue options beyond futility or sucking the dicks of the powerful." -- Eric the .5b

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Kwix
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Re: Food

Post by Kwix » 05 Apr 2018, 19:29

Jennifer wrote:
05 Apr 2018, 19:00
Hmm, interesting! But to clarify: I don't care so much whether the paprika bits in the sauce are red or black; my concern is that, if the blackening means the paprika actually burned, that might ruin the flavor or just be a waste of paprika.
I understand and this is the correct approach. It's probably not the butter solids burning but if you want extra insurance you can clarify the butter before hand or add some flavor by making ghee. Either one will keep for years in the fridge so by all means make a bunch.

Ghee:
Take as much butter as you'll use in a year (1lb minimum). Melt in saucepan over low heat. Once it starts foaming whisk gently, frequently but not constantly. Watch it closely. The foam will start to subside, watch it closer. Whisk occasionally. The milk solids should be sitting on the bottom of the pan at this point and will start to change from creamy yellow to light brown, then to to dark brown, then to burnt. You should not let it get to burnt. The butter will be hot and will continue cooking for a couple of minutes after pulling it off the burner so I usually pull it off at "just past light brown". It should smell sort of like baking chocolate chip cookies. To separate out the solids strain or decant while hot into a suitable container to cool (another pan, pyrex measuring cup, etc.). Store sealed in a cool location for the length of U.S. Copyright.
From "my butter is fully melted but not quite foaming" to "burnt" on a pound of butter will usually take less than 10 minutes.

Clarified Butter:
Same as above but stop when the foam is gone but before the solids start changing color.
"pedialyte is like planned parenthood for hangovers. it costs you a bit, but it makes your little problem go away until the next time you drink too much."-- dhex
"Sweet tea is the archvillain in Wilford Brimley's origin story." -- Ellie

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Warren
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Re: Food

Post by Warren » 05 Apr 2018, 20:24

THIS SPACE FOR RENT

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