Food

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pistoffnick
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Re: Food

Post by pistoffnick » 18 Oct 2017, 14:03

Painboy wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 13:56
We're talking about 100+ cookies for a week.
:shock: Are YOU the Cookie Monster?
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JasonL
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Re: Food

Post by JasonL » 18 Oct 2017, 14:03

I would think dough would be the most efficient way to do it. Anything here help?

http://www.thekitchn.com/the-best-cooki ... chn-213638

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Jadagul
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Re: Food

Post by Jadagul » 18 Oct 2017, 14:04

I would expect refrigerating them to make them go bad faster. I know refrigeration speed staling; it can easily speed drying out as well.

I think any good solution is going to involve a brief rebake before you eat them.

I've heard people suggest rolling the cookie dough into a log and then freezing it that way, so you can slice some off to bake later.

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lunchstealer
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Re: Food

Post by lunchstealer » 18 Oct 2017, 14:12

pistoffnick wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 13:01
After listening to the Coloradans on here brag about it, I made Colorado Green Chili with tomatillos and Anaheim peppers from my garden. I specifically grew the tomatillos just for this dish. I was also excited to learn that Hatch peppers are just another name for Anaheims. And I already had Anaheims planted.

It is pretty damn good. I followed the recipe pretty closely so it is a little bland for me. I can just add some heat via hot sauce though.
mrs lunch has issues with the ring of fire, so I have to make mine super bland. I bring mine up to baseline at serving by adding either Cholula or a healthy dose of crushed red pepper or ground cayenne or chipotle, depending on if I'm okay adding acid or smokiness and often which one requires the least effort.

Recently I've been NewMexicoing it up a bit by adding hominy/posole and using harina de atole (basically rough ground blue corn flour/meal) as the thickener rather than straight masa or crushing the stale dregs of the last batch of tortilla chips as I used to do. I notice that the linked recipe purees the veggies to thicken, but I like some maize-based method for pseudo-authenticity. I'm not sure if the harina does a whole lot relative to the masa or tortilla chips, but the hominy does add something to the dish. Yellow hominy rather than posole (I had accidentally grabbed hominy when looking for canned corn for a different thing) adds some color, but I don't know if there's any particular reason to choose one over the other. Dried posole hominy can be gotten in my ethnic food aisle with the dried Mexican spices, and that's where I found the harina de atole, too. Dunno what you'll find in the Great Scandinavian North.
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Jennifer
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Re: Food

Post by Jennifer » 18 Oct 2017, 14:13

Fridges speed up the staling of bread because staleness is actually caused by water molecules interacting thusly-and-so with the bread molecules; all else being equal, the drier the air is, the longer the bread will last. (Jeff and I had to start refrigerating our bread after moving to Atlanta, because trying to keep it in its bag on the counter resulted in the bread going moldy far faster than we've been accustomed to.) For regular sandwich bread, we keep it in its bag with the twist-tie tightly wrapped; for bread we want to make stale, for French toast, we put the slices into the open refrigerator, and the parts exposed to the air go rock-hard stale usually overnight.

It's weird that Painboy's cookies are going stale so fast if he's got them sealed in airtight Tupperware, though. Unless the air is humid where he is, and that small Tupperware container can nonetheless hold a relatively large amount of humidity in addition to its cookie burden?
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Painboy
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Re: Food

Post by Painboy » 18 Oct 2017, 14:19

pistoffnick wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 14:03
Painboy wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 13:56
We're talking about 100+ cookies for a week.
:shock: Are YOU the Cookie Monster?
It's a diet thing. Oats are one of the few things that don't turn my intestines into pain. Making it into cookies makes it easier to manipulate portion sizes and I don't have to find a microwave or stove to cook up a bowl. I originally I wanted to make it into bars but cookies were a lot easier to make.

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Ellie
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Re: Food

Post by Ellie » 18 Oct 2017, 14:57

Freeze them after baking in big Zip-loc bags? Shouldn't take up TOO much space (and will take up less every day!)
I should have listened to Warren. He was right again as usual.

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JasonL
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Food

Post by JasonL » 18 Oct 2017, 15:05

General rule of freezing units of things. Freeze them without letting them touch during the process. Use a sheet or a plate or something, or use wax paper between stacks of things. After frozen you can store in bag while touching. Shitty frozen shrimp - one big lump o shrimp. Good frozen shrimp - each one frozen separately with minimal ice crystals.

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Warren
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Re: Food

Post by Warren » 18 Oct 2017, 15:51

JasonL wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 15:05
General rule of freezing units of things. Freeze them without letting them touch during the process. Use a sheet or a plate or something, or use wax paper between stacks of things. After frozen you can store in bag while touching. Shitty frozen shrimp - one big lump o shrimp. Good frozen shrimp - each one frozen separately with minimal ice crystals.
You can only open the bag once. The least exposure to room temperature air will big lumpify the contents of the bag. Even the defrost cycle will do it if you leave them in there long enough.

I'm going to recommend making a big batch of dough and freezing it in one batch tubs. That gives you the most economical use of freezer space, and is much easier than trying to make a roll. The tubs will need several hours to thaw, but you can leave them out overnight, or move them to the fridge a few days ahead of time. Then just scoop out cookie portions with a spoon or disher when ready to bake.
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Jadagul
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Re: Food

Post by Jadagul » 18 Oct 2017, 17:27

Painboy wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 14:19
pistoffnick wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 14:03
Painboy wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 13:56
We're talking about 100+ cookies for a week.
:shock: Are YOU the Cookie Monster?
It's a diet thing. Oats are one of the few things that don't turn my intestines into pain. Making it into cookies makes it easier to manipulate portion sizes and I don't have to find a microwave or stove to cook up a bowl. I originally I wanted to make it into bars but cookies were a lot easier to make.
Ooooh, you're making oatmeal cookies. Completely different ball game. You probably don't have to worry about staling, but you really have to worry about drying out---which explains your problems.

Offhand, I'd recommend freezing ziplock bags where each bag has one serving.
Jennifer wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 14:13
Fridges speed up the staling of bread because staleness is actually caused by water molecules interacting thusly-and-so with the bread molecules; all else being equal, the drier the air is, the longer the bread will last. (Jeff and I had to start refrigerating our bread after moving to Atlanta, because trying to keep it in its bag on the counter resulted in the bread going moldy far faster than we've been accustomed to.) For regular sandwich bread, we keep it in its bag with the twist-tie tightly wrapped; for bread we want to make stale, for French toast, we put the slices into the open refrigerator, and the parts exposed to the air go rock-hard stale usually overnight.

It's weird that Painboy's cookies are going stale so fast if he's got them sealed in airtight Tupperware, though. Unless the air is humid where he is, and that small Tupperware container can nonetheless hold a relatively large amount of humidity in addition to its cookie burden?
I know this is my hobbyhorse, but remember that drying out and staling are not the same thing. Putting bread in the fridge sometimes helps you keep it from drying out, and sometimes speeds the drying out, depending on various factors. But it always speeds staling, because staling is a chemical reaction in the starch molecules that's sped by colder temperatures.

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Painboy
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Re: Food

Post by Painboy » 18 Oct 2017, 18:24

Jadagul wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 17:27
Painboy wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 14:19
pistoffnick wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 14:03
Painboy wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 13:56
We're talking about 100+ cookies for a week.
:shock: Are YOU the Cookie Monster?
It's a diet thing. Oats are one of the few things that don't turn my intestines into pain. Making it into cookies makes it easier to manipulate portion sizes and I don't have to find a microwave or stove to cook up a bowl. I originally I wanted to make it into bars but cookies were a lot easier to make.
Ooooh, you're making oatmeal cookies. Completely different ball game. You probably don't have to worry about staling, but you really have to worry about drying out---which explains your problems.

Offhand, I'd recommend freezing ziplock bags where each bag has one serving.
Yeah, I guess the main issue then is drying out. They basically turn into crumbly dirt after about 6-7 days.

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Jennifer
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Re: Food

Post by Jennifer » 18 Oct 2017, 19:03

Jadagul wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 17:27

I know this is my hobbyhorse, but remember that drying out and staling are not the same thing.

I know, as I alluded to when I mentioned that exposure to humidity makes bread go stale faster (which presumably explains why open bread in my refrigerator gets rock-hard stale in a shockingly short time).
"Myself, despite what they say about libertarians, I think we're actually allowed to pursue options beyond futility or sucking the dicks of the powerful." -- Eric the .5b

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Jadagul
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Re: Food

Post by Jadagul » 18 Oct 2017, 19:29

Jennifer wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 19:03
Jadagul wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 17:27

I know this is my hobbyhorse, but remember that drying out and staling are not the same thing.

I know, as I alluded to when I mentioned that exposure to humidity makes bread go stale faster (which presumably explains why open bread in my refrigerator gets rock-hard stale in a shockingly short time).
I'm confused, then, because refrigerators are usually dry. And stale bread isn't rock-hard; it's more of a leather texture. What you're describing sounds more like drying out than like staling, though of course I'm not there experiencing it myself, so I could be wrong.

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Jennifer
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Re: Food

Post by Jennifer » 18 Oct 2017, 19:37

Jadagul wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 19:29
Jennifer wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 19:03
Jadagul wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 17:27

I know this is my hobbyhorse, but remember that drying out and staling are not the same thing.

I know, as I alluded to when I mentioned that exposure to humidity makes bread go stale faster (which presumably explains why open bread in my refrigerator gets rock-hard stale in a shockingly short time).
I'm confused, then, because refrigerators are usually dry. And stale bread isn't rock-hard; it's more of a leather texture. What you're describing sounds more like drying out than like staling, though of course I'm not there experiencing it myself, so I could be wrong.
I read the opposite -- compared to "normal" home environments ("normal" as opposed to, say, "Atlanta sans AC during the super-humid time of year"), a fridge is likely to have more humid air than the outside, because of all the beverages and things it holds.
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Jadagul
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Re: Food

Post by Jadagul » 18 Oct 2017, 19:55

Jennifer wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 19:37
Jadagul wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 19:29
Jennifer wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 19:03
Jadagul wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 17:27

I know this is my hobbyhorse, but remember that drying out and staling are not the same thing.

I know, as I alluded to when I mentioned that exposure to humidity makes bread go stale faster (which presumably explains why open bread in my refrigerator gets rock-hard stale in a shockingly short time).
I'm confused, then, because refrigerators are usually dry. And stale bread isn't rock-hard; it's more of a leather texture. What you're describing sounds more like drying out than like staling, though of course I'm not there experiencing it myself, so I could be wrong.
I read the opposite -- compared to "normal" home environments ("normal" as opposed to, say, "Atlanta sans AC during the super-humid time of year"), a fridge is likely to have more humid air than the outside, because of all the beverages and things it holds.
How many open drinks do you store in your refrigerator?

Apparently this does vary; there are some sources of humidity in the fridge so they're not totally dry. But the cooling coils are continually taking moisture out of the fridge air (it all condenses on the coils), so fridge air is much drier than room air. Unless something very strange is going on, or your fridge is malfunctioning.

(The reason you have cripser/vegetable drawers in the fridge is to keep the moisture in the drawer, rather than letting it all slip out and dry into the dryness of the fridge).

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Jasper
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Re: Food

Post by Jasper » 18 Oct 2017, 20:05

Jad is correct, a fridge is typically a drying environment. It's why they have drawers specifically for produce which are protected and controlled against the larger environment. A head of lettuce on a shelf is gonna wilt a lot faster than in one of the drawers.

The coldness speeds staling due to the recrystalization of the starch molecules in bread, which is why it has that leathery texture despite most bagged sandwich type bread having various texture modifiers in the formula.

Stale bread can be rescued by heating so that the starch rehydrates and turns back into a gel. Bread that's lost most of its moisture and had mostly crystallized starch is just going to keep drying out.
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dbcooper
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Re: Food

Post by dbcooper » 03 Nov 2017, 19:29

This fried egg salad looks good:

Slip inside a sleeping bag.

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Warren
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Re: Food

Post by Warren » 03 Nov 2017, 19:41

dbcooper wrote:
03 Nov 2017, 19:29
This fried egg salad looks good:

I would caramelize the onions, and slopping oil all over the egg whites is right out. I prefer my eggs treated like the delicate treasures that they are.
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JasonL
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Re: Food

Post by JasonL » 04 Nov 2017, 09:40

The olive oil fried egg is the best fried egg.

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Warren
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Re: Food

Post by Warren » 04 Nov 2017, 10:38

:?
JasonL wrote:
04 Nov 2017, 09:40
The olive oil fried egg is the best fried egg.
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JasonL
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Re: Food

Post by JasonL » 04 Nov 2017, 13:06

It's just better. You get crispy edges and can flavor the oil with herbs or pimenton or turmeric or a bunch of other stuff if you want. Butter for scrambled olive oil plus basted white for fried.

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Jennifer
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Re: Food

Post by Jennifer » 04 Nov 2017, 13:19

I am extremely skeptical of the notion that an olive-oil-fried egg (or any other variety) could be superior to a bacon-fat-fried egg. YUM.
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dhex
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Re: Food

Post by dhex » 04 Nov 2017, 15:36

JasonL wrote:
04 Nov 2017, 09:40
The olive oil fried egg is the best fried egg.
Jason is right. Pork fat gives you pork flavor. Olive oil egg can be anything you put your mind to.
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Warren
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Re: Food

Post by Warren » 04 Nov 2017, 15:50

A perfectly poached egg is the ultimate expression of egg. If you must have additional fat, let it be butter.
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dhex
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Re: Food

Post by dhex » 04 Nov 2017, 17:14

Eggs are Hella flexible.
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