Food

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Fin Fang Foom
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Re: Food

Post by Fin Fang Foom » 12 Sep 2017, 17:51

Wonderbread solely exists for post Thanksgiving turkey sandwiches, if then.
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Jadagul
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Re: Food

Post by Jadagul » 12 Sep 2017, 20:58

I make whole-wheat breads and "white" breads. My friends consistently prefer the white, much to my surprise.

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Jennifer
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Re: Food

Post by Jennifer » 12 Sep 2017, 21:29

I have always preferred white bread to whole wheat. If I'd lived in wartime England, when wheat bread was the only kind legally available, that would've made me switch to a low-carb diet.

Nowadays I buy "Italian" sandwich loaves, which taste even better than "white" although they look the same, and I have no idea what makes a loaf of bread "Italian" rather than "white."
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Fin Fang Foom
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Re: Food

Post by Fin Fang Foom » 12 Sep 2017, 21:48

Feeling tempted to post a clip from True Romance here . . .
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Jadagul
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Re: Food

Post by Jadagul » 12 Sep 2017, 22:00

Jennifer wrote:
12 Sep 2017, 21:29
I have always preferred white bread to whole wheat. If I'd lived in wartime England, when wheat bread was the only kind legally available, that would've made me switch to a low-carb diet.

Nowadays I buy "Italian" sandwich loaves, which taste even better than "white" although they look the same, and I have no idea what makes a loaf of bread "Italian" rather than "white."
At one level, "Italian" is a subset of "white"; in this context, "white" just means "does not use the whole wheat grain".

But "white" can also more specifically mean wonderbread-like, which Italian is not.

Whole wheat bread has a nuttier "flour" flavor, and is harder to make fluffy.

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Jennifer
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Re: Food

Post by Jennifer » 13 Sep 2017, 02:43

Jadagul wrote:
12 Sep 2017, 22:00

At one level, "Italian" is a subset of "white"; in this context, "white" just means "does not use the whole wheat grain".

But "white" can also more specifically mean wonderbread-like, which Italian is not.
What do you mean by "wonderbread-like?"
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Jadagul
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Re: Food

Post by Jadagul » 13 Sep 2017, 02:51

Jennifer wrote:
13 Sep 2017, 02:43
Jadagul wrote:
12 Sep 2017, 22:00

At one level, "Italian" is a subset of "white"; in this context, "white" just means "does not use the whole wheat grain".

But "white" can also more specifically mean wonderbread-like, which Italian is not.
What do you mean by "wonderbread-like?"
Very soft, very white, not much flavor, not much texture. Go to your grocery store, find the cheapest loaf of plastic-bagged white bread they have; that's what I'm talking about. Also, they typically have a bunch of preservatives and additives in them, but you can make the same basic idea without those.

In contrast, a baguette or a ciabatta or something is generally "white bread" in the sense of being made with white flour rather than with whole wheat flour. But they have more flavor to them, and more texture---they tend to be chewier and have more structure. Your "Italian bread" is almost certainly in this category.

When people say "white-bread" as an insult, they're referencing the first category, not the second. Hence the Nicole-Jason exchange that started this off.

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Highway
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Re: Food

Post by Highway » 13 Sep 2017, 08:25

I like grocery store white bread fine. Most of the time it's way easier to deal with. You can keep it in the house for more than 3 days without it getting stale or moldy, you can make almost any type of easy sandwich with it (PB&J, sliced lunchmeat, BLT, egg and cheese) without it being out of place or in the way. And you can always lightly toast it to give it some texture, and different brands have different levels of sponginess and structure.

Does it add a lot on its own to what you're eating? Not really, except for the fact that when it's there, now you can actually make a sandwich or toast and jam or french toast or whatever, instead of "oh, that loaf went bad, guess I'll think of something else to eat."
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Jennifer
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Re: Food

Post by Jennifer » 13 Sep 2017, 17:29

I am very glad Irma caused my household nothing worse than a 10- or 15-minute power outage, but now I have a buttload of canned food of the sort which I don't generally eat when I can cook and make use of the fridge and freezer. I'll hang on to this stuff until November (the official end of hurricane season), but then I'll have to figure out a way to work such items as canned pasta, canned deviled-chicken spread, canned corned beef and canned chicken and dumplings into my diet.
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Warren
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Re: Food

Post by Warren » 18 Sep 2017, 19:26

Cooked frozen pot-stickers to go with Shrimp Bowls (shrimp, ramen, snow peas, etc.)
The only decent Chinese place closed a year or two ago. I only had one packet of duck sauce in the fridge, so I made my own sauce. Didn't have any apricots, dried or jam. But I did have prunes and apple juice. A little soy sauce, a little candied ginger, a little rice wine vinegar, a little chili powder, a little garlic powder, a touch of cayenne pepper, and a dash of sesame oil, plus a little honey to tighten it up.
Pretty good plum sauce. I've got some left over. Thinking of using it on Cornish hens.
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JasonL
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Re: Food

Post by JasonL » 18 Sep 2017, 20:39

Good move. I've done a mixed berry preserves + soy and vinegar / Asian gastrique thing before that came across like a plum sauce.

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JasonL
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Re: Food

Post by JasonL » 22 Sep 2017, 23:37

This is the best rice I've ever cooked with by a good margin. Japanese short grain perfect for rice cookers.


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Andrew
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Re: Food

Post by Andrew » 27 Sep 2017, 12:19

Because I'm a lazy, lazy man, I like to run the crockpot on Sunday and have leftovers for dinner all week. The latest experiment:

1 onion
1 lb carrots
1 lb frozen green beans
4 cloves garlic
8 chicken thighs
Half bottle of spicy and sweet soy-based marinade
Some extra soy sauce
4 heaping spoonfuls of chili paste
3.5 cups water

I chopped all the veggies and put them in the bottom, layered the chicken on top, and then mixed all the sauces/water and dumped on top. The liquid came to the top of the chicken, which was probably overkill, but I hate dried out chicken. 4.5 hours on high and then pulled everything out with a big slotted spoon.

It turned out shockingly well. The chicken was moist enough to shred with a fork, and it had some nice heat to it. The veggies weren't mush but instead still a little firm. For lazy bachelor cooking, it's worth doing again (and maybe for the next 6 months).
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Jasper
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Re: Food

Post by Jasper » 27 Sep 2017, 16:33

It's officially fall even though the weather is still summer-warm, so we busted out our crock-pot last weekend too. Did a "Cuban in my mind" thing with a pork roast rubbed liberally with salt, pepper, and red pepper flakes, sitting on top of chopped onions, baby red potatoes, a whole head of garlic cloves, and a half-cup of OJ as starting liquid. 6 hrs. on low. Came out OK. Needed more depth. Would do again but add some cumin to the spices and apply the spices the night before.
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Fin Fang Foom
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Re: Food

Post by Fin Fang Foom » 29 Sep 2017, 15:48

So dhex and Rachel,

Are pork rolls any good?
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dhex
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Re: Food

Post by dhex » 29 Sep 2017, 18:50

I had to Google that. Wtf? Looks like spam. I'm from north jersey, and that looks like more of a Philly thing. E.g. Gross
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Eric the .5b
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Re: Food

Post by Eric the .5b » 29 Sep 2017, 20:35

"However, while it has flavor/texture components of each of the above [Treet, bologna], it is not prepared from a meat emulsion. Thus, it has the grainy consistency of cooked salami or kielbasa rather than that of bologna or hot dogs. In fact, smoked kielbasa might be the closest nationwide comparison. "

Hmm. Doesn't immediately sound horrible.

I was assuming something like a pork pastie, though, which sounds much better.
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Painboy
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Re: Food

Post by Painboy » 18 Oct 2017, 12:29

Does anyone have any experience with vacuum sealing baked goods, specifically cookies?

Currently the cookies I make only last a week before they start getting hard and stale even when kept in a sealed Tupperware bin. So this means I need to make a batch every week. Ideally I would like to make a batch every two weeks or even a month. So if I were to seal them up via vacuum sealing after baking them how long would they last?

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lunchstealer
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Re: Food

Post by lunchstealer » 18 Oct 2017, 12:34

Painboy wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 12:29
Does anyone have any experience with vacuum sealing baked goods, specifically cookies?

Currently the cookies I make only last a week before they start getting hard and stale even when kept in a sealed Tupperware bin. So this means I need to make a batch every week. Ideally I would like to make a batch every two weeks or even a month. So if I were to seal them up via vacuum sealing after baking them how long would they last?
If you're making from scratch, you could always make the dough for four batches, then freeze three batches' worth (already separated into cookie-sized thinglets) and then pull one batch at a time and bake it a la the store-bought dough,
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Warren
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Re: Food

Post by Warren » 18 Oct 2017, 12:36

Painboy wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 12:29
Does anyone have any experience with vacuum sealing baked goods, specifically cookies?

Currently the cookies I make only last a week before they start getting hard and stale even when kept in a sealed Tupperware bin. So this means I need to make a batch every week. Ideally I would like to make a batch every two weeks or even a month. So if I were to seal them up via vacuum sealing after baking them how long would they last?
Have you tried freezing them?
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JD
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Re: Food

Post by JD » 18 Oct 2017, 12:51

dhex wrote:
29 Sep 2017, 18:50
I had to Google that. Wtf? Looks like spam. I'm from north jersey, and that looks like more of a Philly thing. E.g. Gross
You know, it's occurred to me that everywhere has its regional foods that natives love and non-natives either dislike or just don't really see the appeal of. For example, the cheese steak, the black and white cookie, the bagel, scrapple, goetta, etc.

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Warren
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Re: Food

Post by Warren » 18 Oct 2017, 12:58

JD wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 12:51
dhex wrote:
29 Sep 2017, 18:50
I had to Google that. Wtf? Looks like spam. I'm from north jersey, and that looks like more of a Philly thing. E.g. Gross
You know, it's occurred to me that everywhere has its regional foods that natives love and non-natives either dislike or just don't really see the appeal of. For example, the cheese steak, the black and white cookie, the bagel, scrapple, goetta, etc.
Cheese steak and bagels don't belong on that list as they have been embraced everywhere.

Poutine belongs on the list.
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pistoffnick
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Re: Food

Post by pistoffnick » 18 Oct 2017, 13:01

After listening to the Coloradans on here brag about it, I made Colorado Green Chili with tomatillos and Anaheim peppers from my garden. I specifically grew the tomatillos just for this dish. I was also excited to learn that Hatch peppers are just another name for Anaheims. And I already had Anaheims planted.

It is pretty damn good. I followed the recipe pretty closely so it is a little bland for me. I can just add some heat via hot sauce though.
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JasonL
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Re: Food

Post by JasonL » 18 Oct 2017, 13:32

pistoffnick wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 13:01
After listening to the Coloradans on here brag about it, I made Colorado Green Chili with tomatillos and Anaheim peppers from my garden. I specifically grew the tomatillos just for this dish. I was also excited to learn that Hatch peppers are just another name for Anaheims. And I already had Anaheims planted.

It is pretty damn good. I followed the recipe pretty closely so it is a little bland for me. I can just add some heat via hot sauce though.
A related thing I do from upthread:

Posole verde - did 5 Anaheims and 1 Serrano seeds in and this time instead of dice cut the chilies lengthwise and then thin sliced the halves across. The effect upon softening is to add good texture to the broth as it reduces. 2 onions, 6 cloves garlic and the chilies as a mirepoix after browning and removing cubed pork. Add maybe 2.5c chicken stock/broth after mirepoix softens. Add pork back in and simmer partial covered for maybe 25-30 mins until a rich texture. Add 1-2 cans hominy at the end and simmer another few mins for posoleness or skip it and serve over rice. This was pretty mild. I'd do 2 Serranos next time and I'd guess the dhex's of the world would do 3-4. I would also like to have some poblano in there. I liked the anaheims better than I thought I would, but I'd like some complexity in the greens I think.

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Painboy
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Re: Food

Post by Painboy » 18 Oct 2017, 13:56

lunchstealer wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 12:34
Painboy wrote:
18 Oct 2017, 12:29
Does anyone have any experience with vacuum sealing baked goods, specifically cookies?

Currently the cookies I make only last a week before they start getting hard and stale even when kept in a sealed Tupperware bin. So this means I need to make a batch every week. Ideally I would like to make a batch every two weeks or even a month. So if I were to seal them up via vacuum sealing after baking them how long would they last?
If you're making from scratch, you could always make the dough for four batches, then freeze three batches' worth (already separated into cookie-sized thinglets) and then pull one batch at a time and bake it a la the store-bought dough,
I should have mentioned that freezing was actually my first idea as well. However, the logistics of freezing them is currently difficult in the house as there is little freezer space to spare. We're talking about 100+ cookies for a week. If I'm trying to freeze individual cookie portions on a pan that's a lot of real estate (or a lot of time swapping pans in and out).

I have thought about trying to freeze the batter in a roll that I could easily slice into individual cookies but I haven't found a practical way to do that.

Vacuum sealing seamed like a way to preserve them and allow me to stack them in the freezer or refrigerator more easily.

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