Food

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Jennifer
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Re: Food

Post by Jennifer »

There's a "farmer's market" (full-time indoor grocery store) near us that sells smoked, seasoned turkey parts which Jeff and I both find MUCH tastier (and easier) than regular raw "flavor and prepare it yourself" turkey, so for Thanksgiving and other turkey-eating events, we buy and heat the drumsticks, for $2.99 a pound.

We liked it so much that the last time we went to the farmer's market we inspected their other smoked-turkey offerings; they also sell turkey tails for $2.99 a pound, so we bought some as an experiment. The tails have no bones in them, so we thought perhaps we'd get more meat for our money that way, compared to buying drumsticks.

WRONG. Turns out turkey tails, though boneless, also have very little actual meat; it's mostly gristle or cartilage or something like that. (It might be useful to boil down into a broth or something, but IMO selling it for the same price per pound as the much meatier drumsticks is bullshit.) In human-cannibal-market terms, it would be like buying "noses and outer ears" for the same price per pound as drumsticks and thighs: even though these body parts are boneless, you'll still get far more meat per pound if you buy the bony leg parts.
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Jadagul
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Re: Food

Post by Jadagul »

Sounds like they'd be amazing for making stock, though.
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Jennifer
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Re: Food

Post by Jennifer »

No doubt, but I wouldn't willingly pay the same price per pound for stock or broth components (I always get the two confused) as I do for actual meat.
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JasonL
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Re: Food

Post by JasonL »

Stock always is made from bones and connective tissue but not always meat. Stock is long cooked to extract collagen but is not seasoned with salt because it will be used for many different purposes each with their own seasoning requirements.

Broth is made with meat and maybe some bones, but mostly is an extraction of meat flavor into water to make a light flavored liquid - classic broth is poached chicken breasts for like 10 minutes.
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Warren
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Re: Food

Post by Warren »

I season my stock, very gently. No matter what I'm doing with it, it's getting salt.
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thoreau
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Re: Food

Post by thoreau »

Last night I introduced the inlaws to tamales. I was worried that they would be turned off by the Mexican aspect, so I told them about the nuns who sell tamales as a Christmas fundraiser.

I have successfully introduced my in-laws to Mexican Christmas food.
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Warren
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Re: Food

Post by Warren »

thoreau wrote: 25 Dec 2019, 09:50 Last night I introduced the inlaws to tamales. I was worried that they would be turned off by the Mexican aspect, so I told them about the nuns who sell tamales as a Christmas fundraiser.

I have successfully introduced my in-laws to Mexican Christmas food.
Wait. Your in-laws avoid ethnic food because bigots?
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dhex
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Re: Food

Post by dhex »

I made beef tenderloin for Xmas dinner and it was fucking off the chain good.
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Jennifer
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Re: Food

Post by Jennifer »

thoreau wrote: 25 Dec 2019, 09:50 Last night I introduced the inlaws to tamales. I was worried that they would be turned off by the Mexican aspect, so I told them about the nuns who sell tamales as a Christmas fundraiser.
[freakout] Aaaaaigh! That's even worse! Bad enough to face the horrifying prospect of a dystopian America with taco and tamale trucks on every corner -- but these multiculturalism-peddlers are also taking orders from the Vatican??! [/freakout]
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thoreau
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Re: Food

Post by thoreau »

I have no proof that they would refuse to eat something that is too Mexican, but after certain conversations I decided that I didn't want to find out the hard way. So I just emphasized how Catholic and Christmas-focused this food is. These in-laws are very Catholic.
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Jennifer
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Re: Food

Post by Jennifer »

Today I learned that if you're making a recipe and spill a bit of xanthum-gum powder, you do NOT want to try cleaning it up with water or a damp towel or sponge, the way you might if you spilled a little bit of some other ground spice, because the water and xanthum gum combine to make a really sticky, slimy sort of coating.

I don't know what you should use, ideally, to wipe up xanthum gum spills, but I know water isn't it.
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Jasper
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Re: Food

Post by Jasper »

Yeah, any of the gums you'd want to brush-off dry because most are high-viscosity hydrocolloids and will turn to sticky snot if you just get them damp. If they're already that way, then scraping it up or copious amounts of water will be needed. Except for gum acacia; that one is low viscosity, and i'm not even sure what you'd need it for in a home recipe. Soluble fiber, maybe.

Christmas dinner for me and the Mrs. was reverse-seared ribeyes, roasted broccoli, mushrooms & shallots, and home made ciabatta.
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Jennifer
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Re: Food

Post by Jennifer »

Jasper wrote: 26 Dec 2019, 11:07 Yeah, any of the gums you'd want to brush-off dry because most are high-viscosity hydrocolloids and will turn to sticky snot if you just get them damp. If they're already that way, then scraping it up or copious amounts of water will be needed.
I kept thinking about Greek fire -- the lost ancient weapon that floated on water, and burned (terrifying in the days of wooden ships), and pouring water on it only made it burn hotter -- came to mind as I stood at the kitchen sink trying to wash the xanthum slime from my fingers.
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Jennifer
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Re: Food

Post by Jennifer »

Jennifer wrote: 15 Dec 2019, 18:26
Jennifer wrote: 17 Oct 2019, 01:29 So I was out for an exercise walk and saw that in the little strip mall next door a new business opened up: a take-out fried seafood place. And I realized I hadn't had fried clam strips in a loooong time, so I thought I'd order some if it didn't cost too much: turns out the menu has multiple forms of fried shrimp, lobster tail (not your usual restaurant-in-the-'hood fare), and a couple types of fish I don't recall... but no fried clams. No clams at all, in fact. A fried-seafood joint with no clams on the menu. I didn't know things like that existed in America. At least not anywhere on the east coast.
Well, that didn't last long. Today I decided to take a much longer than usual exercise walk (the temperature and humidity are actually in the rare-for-Georgia range where walking outdoors at a brisk pace is PLEASANT), and I put a few bucks in my pocket beforehand, thinking I'd reward myself after the walk by trying one of their seafood-stuffed potatoes or seafood mac-n-cheese dishes. But the lights were off AND there was a padlock and chain around the front doors.
Jeff has been on an actual mission lately -- when I told him about my clam-cravings, and also mentioned "You know, I think the last time I had fried clams was the last time we went to friendly's, in Connecticut" .. which made him realize he too used to eat fried clams fairly often, and would like to have some again.

Long story short: you can indeed get fried clams in and around the Atlanta area, even without going to Long John Silver's (whose clams IMO are not very good anyway) ... but they're more of an upscale kind of seafood thing, not the cheap seafood they'd always been for me.
"Myself, despite what they say about libertarians, I think we're actually allowed to pursue options beyond futility or sucking the dicks of the powerful." -- Eric the .5b
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lunchstealer
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Re: Food

Post by lunchstealer »

Jennifer wrote: 28 Dec 2019, 14:15
Jennifer wrote: 15 Dec 2019, 18:26
Jennifer wrote: 17 Oct 2019, 01:29 So I was out for an exercise walk and saw that in the little strip mall next door a new business opened up: a take-out fried seafood place. And I realized I hadn't had fried clam strips in a loooong time, so I thought I'd order some if it didn't cost too much: turns out the menu has multiple forms of fried shrimp, lobster tail (not your usual restaurant-in-the-'hood fare), and a couple types of fish I don't recall... but no fried clams. No clams at all, in fact. A fried-seafood joint with no clams on the menu. I didn't know things like that existed in America. At least not anywhere on the east coast.
Well, that didn't last long. Today I decided to take a much longer than usual exercise walk (the temperature and humidity are actually in the rare-for-Georgia range where walking outdoors at a brisk pace is PLEASANT), and I put a few bucks in my pocket beforehand, thinking I'd reward myself after the walk by trying one of their seafood-stuffed potatoes or seafood mac-n-cheese dishes. But the lights were off AND there was a padlock and chain around the front doors.
Jeff has been on an actual mission lately -- when I told him about my clam-cravings, and also mentioned "You know, I think the last time I had fried clams was the last time we went to friendly's, in Connecticut" .. which made him realize he too used to eat fried clams fairly often, and would like to have some again.

Long story short: you can indeed get fried clams in and around the Atlanta area, even without going to Long John Silver's (whose clams IMO are not very good anyway) ... but they're more of an upscale kind of seafood thing, not the cheap seafood they'd always been for me.
They were available at the Seafood Hut in Camden SC throughout the '80s. But they were less delicious than the calabash shrimp (completely shelled including removal of the tail which - why is that not more of a thing?) so I almost never had them.
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Jennifer
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Re: Food

Post by Jennifer »

There is a certain new recipe I intend to try -- hopefully this evening, if certain things thaw out in time -- so before Jeff and I went grocery shopping today, as he wrote out the grocery list I checked the recipe ingredients to see if we needed anything. It calls for a pound of bacon, which I told him to add to the list, but he said there IS an unopened pound of bacon in the back of the freezer, which is now thawing in the fridge. It has been continuously frozen since we bought it -- but I notice the best-by date is July 2018.

I am going to risk it, since it HAS been frozen all this while. Worst likely case is, it will taste slightly less good, be slightly freezer-burned, or have slightly fewer nutrients (not that I'd have any way of noticing).
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Jennifer
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Re: Food

Post by Jennifer »

Turns out bacon that's 18 months past its best-by date is still perfectly good provided it has been frozen all the while. Also, I have discovered a very tasty, presumably nutritious and easy-to-make recipe, for those times of year when you can use your oven. I used the printed-cookbook version of this Betty Crocker recipe for "Savory Apple Brunch Bake," which I actually ate for dinner. The original version calls specifically to use a "cooking apple" and lists a couple possible varieties in addition to the Golden Delicious mentioned online. My one complaint with the recipe, at least the way I made it, is that I did not chop the apple finely enough -- with the end result, some mouthfuls were "nothing but apple" while others were "apple-free." So the next time I make this I will chop the apple into more and smaller pieces, but i DEFINITELY intend to make this again.

(FWIW, I used store-brand Bisquick rather than the official BC brand version.)
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Jasper
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Re: Food

Post by Jasper »

My bread game has picked up over the last several weeks since getting Flour Water Salt Yeast by Ken Forkish
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Ellie
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Re: Food

Post by Ellie »

I never really got the appeal of bread baking (and probably my dislike of Paul Hollywood put me off further) but I can see it now! Those are some sexy food pics!
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Warren
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Re: Food

Post by Warren »

Bread hot from the oven is better than sex.
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Ellie
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Re: Food

Post by Ellie »

I just grabbed the ebook through my local library and am looking forward to reading through it.

Also, "Forkish" is a great last name for a food writer.
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dbcooper
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Re: Food

Post by dbcooper »

Jasper wrote: 06 Jan 2020, 10:52 My bread game has picked up over the last several weeks since getting Flour Water Salt Yeast by Ken Forkish
Damn, looks great.
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Jennifer
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Re: Food

Post by Jennifer »

I found an unopened package of walnut bits I'd forgotten all about -- I bought them and some chocolate chips to adulterate the yogurt I briefly ate to restore my gut biome after some antibiotics kicked its ass, and presumably finished the yogurt before getting around to opening this bag of nuts -- and I wonder if anybody knows: if I were to try substituting these for pecans in a pecan-pie recipe (the kind made with Karo syrup), could I get away with that as a straight substitution, or would I need to do something else to alter the flavors?

Also, if a recipe says you can choose between dark or light Karo syrup, which would you say tastes better? What IS the taste difference, exactly?
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Jadagul
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Re: Food

Post by Jadagul »

Jennifer wrote: 07 Jan 2020, 13:49 I found an unopened package of walnut bits I'd forgotten all about -- I bought them and some chocolate chips to adulterate the yogurt I briefly ate to restore my gut biome after some antibiotics kicked its ass, and presumably finished the yogurt before getting around to opening this bag of nuts -- and I wonder if anybody knows: if I were to try substituting these for pecans in a pecan-pie recipe (the kind made with Karo syrup), could I get away with that as a straight substitution, or would I need to do something else to alter the flavors?

Also, if a recipe says you can choose between dark or light Karo syrup, which would you say tastes better? What IS the taste difference, exactly?
Dark syrup is more molasses-y, while light syrup is lighter and more delicate. In this context I'd probably lean towards dark but they're just different flavor profiles? It's like the difference between white and brown sugar, except with less texture changes.

I would expect the walnut pie to work pretty okay. Like, it will taste more like walnuts and less like pecans, but I don't think they're that different. I see a few recipes online for walnut pies, and they look basically just like pecan pie recipes to me.

(Last time I made a pecan pie I mostly made it with almonds, because for some reason pecans are super expensive out here. It worked fine.)
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JD
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Re: Food

Post by JD »

What we learned recently is that while you can substitute molasses for some of the Karo syrup in a pecan pie, you should do so cautiously, because molasses is way more intense. The flavor definitely works, but if you just substitute them one-for-one you would have a huge molasses bomb.
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