Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

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Warren
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by Warren » 08 Aug 2019, 09:54

It's patent nonsense.
The film helps to keep its surroundings cool by absorbing heat from the air inside the box and transmitting that energy through the Earth’s atmosphere into outer space.
It's a straight up violation of the second law of thermodynamics. You can never power a system off of ambient heat. Waste heat is where energy goes to die.
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by lunchstealer » 08 Aug 2019, 10:46

Warren wrote:
08 Aug 2019, 09:54
It's patent nonsense.
The film helps to keep its surroundings cool by absorbing heat from the air inside the box and transmitting that energy through the Earth’s atmosphere into outer space.
It's a straight up violation of the second law of thermodynamics. You can never power a system off of ambient heat. Waste heat is where energy goes to die.
It's not a closed system, and it sounds like all they're talking about is a collimated radiator. It is working off a temperature difference between air and space, which is a 300K+ difference. Directional radiation makes those little black-and-white spinny things in the bulbs work, so it's not like thermal radiation can't do work.

Still not sure the math works out on this, but there is a temperature differential to 'power' the engine, so it's not purely working on ambient heat in a closed system, which would legit be breaking the law.
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by Aresen » 08 Aug 2019, 10:53

lunchstealer wrote:
08 Aug 2019, 10:46
Warren wrote:
08 Aug 2019, 09:54
It's patent nonsense.
The film helps to keep its surroundings cool by absorbing heat from the air inside the box and transmitting that energy through the Earth’s atmosphere into outer space.
It's a straight up violation of the second law of thermodynamics. You can never power a system off of ambient heat. Waste heat is where energy goes to die.
It's not a closed system, and it sounds like all they're talking about is a collimated radiator. It is working off a temperature difference between air and space, which is a 300K+ difference. Directional radiation makes those little black-and-white spinny things in the bulbs work, so it's not like thermal radiation can't do work.

Still not sure the math works out on this, but there is a temperature differential to 'power' the engine, so it's not purely working on ambient heat in a closed system, which would legit be breaking the law.
The second law of thermodynamics is part of the cis white male patriarchy's conspiracy to keep infrared photons down!
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by JD » 12 Aug 2019, 14:52

Beep boop, you silly humans.

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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by Warren » 12 Aug 2019, 15:02

IE wrote:The novel study employs a simple mathematical framework to illustrate that dark matter may have been produced before the Big Bang. More specifically, it would have come into existence during an era known as the cosmic inflation when space was expanding very quickly. This expansion is believed to lead to the introduction of certain types of particles called scalars such as the Higgs boson.
Wait what?
Wikipedia wrote:The inflationary epoch lasted from 10−36 seconds after the conjectured Big Bang singularity to some time between 10−33 and 10−32 seconds after the singularity.
That's what I thought.
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by Painboy » 12 Aug 2019, 18:20

Who cares about Dark Matter when you can find gold
Detecting particles that aren't dark matter is unwanted noise to SABRE—which is why they located the experiment one kilometre down a mineshaft, where the rock above was thought thick enough to absorb any cosmic radiation.

However, the team found some radiation still penetrated—not ideal for isolating rare dark matter events, but creating a powerful source of information. "Nature has given us the most powerful penetrating scanner you can create, and there's no licence required," said Duffy.

These particles that make it to the Stawell Underground Physics Laboratory are muons: short-lived particles similar to electrons, but 200 times heavier. Muons are preferentially scattered by atoms with high atomic numbers and so deposits of heavy metals, such as gold, whose atomic number is six times greater than that of carbon, create shadows similar to bones in a medical X-ray image.

The idea's not entirely new, but Duffy noted that the technology "had come of age." The team's redesigned muon detector prototype is a far cry from its 1960s predecessor, a box of bulky high-voltage electronics that needed two people to lift it. Miniaturisation of electronic components driven by smartphone technology contributed to Duffy's device, which he likens in size to "a fashionable paperweight."

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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by thoreau » 12 Aug 2019, 18:35

A similar concept has been used in archaelogy. If you aren't sure whether that pyramid has hidden chambers, put a muon detector in there and see if you get more muon transmission along certain pathways (i.e. directions that would have them passing through the region of the hidden chamber).

From a fundamental physics perspective, muons are thoroughly unnecessary, but they exist nonetheless. I forgive them for existing because they help us teach relativity (they make for great problems in relativity homework) and help archaeologists search for hidden chambers. Not as useful as a bullwhip when you need to explore ancient ruins, but still useful.
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by Andrew » 12 Aug 2019, 18:49

A relative with a PhD in some sort of geology used to do gold prospecting for mining companies using a detector I never got too many details about. I wonder if it was something similar.
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by Kolohe » 19 Aug 2019, 17:22

Warren wrote:
12 Aug 2019, 15:02
IE wrote:The novel study employs a simple mathematical framework to illustrate that dark matter may have been produced before the Big Bang. More specifically, it would have come into existence during an era known as the cosmic inflation when space was expanding very quickly. This expansion is believed to lead to the introduction of certain types of particles called scalars such as the Higgs boson.
Wait what?
Wikipedia wrote:The inflationary epoch lasted from 10−36 seconds after the conjectured Big Bang singularity to some time between 10−33 and 10−32 seconds after the singularity.
That's what I thought.
Hey, yeah Doktor T can you explain this - https://journals.aps.org/prl/abstract/1 ... 123.061302
Dark matter (DM) may have its origin in a pre-big-bang epoch, the cosmic inflation.
Is this sloppy writing, or different use of terms between the lay and professional audiences? I mean, JHU isn't a charm school.
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by thoreau » 19 Aug 2019, 17:31

As best as I can make out, they're using the term "Inflation" to mean "The First 10^-32 seconds" and "Big Bang" to mean "The next few seconds after that."

But this is not my field, in any sense of the word.
"They were basically like D&D min maxers, but instead of pissing off their DM, they destroyed the global economy. Also, instead of their DM making a level 7 paladin fight a beholder as punishment, he got a +3 sword of turning."
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by Aresen » 19 Aug 2019, 19:06

thoreau wrote:
19 Aug 2019, 17:31
As best as I can make out, they're using the term "Inflation" to mean "The First 10^-32 seconds" and "Big Bang" to mean "The next few seconds after that."

But this is not my field, in any sense of the word.
And that's what confused the hell out of me about the story, since I always thought of the 'Big Bang'* as including the inflationary epoch.

*Preferred terminology: "The Horrendous Space Kablooie"
If Trump supporters wanted a tough guy, why did they elect such a whiny bitch? - Mo

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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by thoreau » 19 Aug 2019, 19:15

Aresen wrote:
19 Aug 2019, 19:06
thoreau wrote:
19 Aug 2019, 17:31
As best as I can make out, they're using the term "Inflation" to mean "The First 10^-32 seconds" and "Big Bang" to mean "The next few seconds after that."

But this is not my field, in any sense of the word.
And that's what confused the hell out of me about the story, since I always thought of the 'Big Bang'* as including the inflationary epoch.

*Preferred terminology: "The Horrendous Space Kablooie"
I think the idea is that the mechanisms in play during the inflationary epoch are so different from what was happening subsequently that it's almost like a completely separate thing.

Also, by using terminology that confuses non-experts, they can get more publicity. "A universe BEFORE the universe!"
"They were basically like D&D min maxers, but instead of pissing off their DM, they destroyed the global economy. Also, instead of their DM making a level 7 paladin fight a beholder as punishment, he got a +3 sword of turning."
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Re: Mo's moderately interesting sci/tech thread

Post by Kolohe » 19 Aug 2019, 20:11

Ok thanks. I always understood "Big Bang" as t=0, though with an open circle on the timeline.
when you wake up as the queen of the n=1 kingdom and mount your steed non sequiturius, do you look out upon all you survey and think “damn, it feels good to be a green idea sleeping furiously?" - dhex

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