Horrible, Offensive Geekery

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Warren
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Re: Horrible, Offensive Geekery

Post by Warren » 18 May 2016, 14:05

MovieBob nerdsplains it


ETA
And if you want to dig deeper.

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Re: Horrible, Offensive Geekery

Post by thoreau » 18 May 2016, 19:03

"ike Wile E. Coyote salivating over a "4000 Ways To Prepare Roadrunner" cookbook without watching his surroundings, the Road Runner of Societal Inertia snuck up on them both and beepbeeped them off the mesa."
--Shem

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Fin Fang Foom
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Re: Horrible, Offensive Geekery

Post by Fin Fang Foom » 18 May 2016, 20:22

Pretty sure the Captain Marvel movie will be about the current girl version.

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Re: Horrible, Offensive Geekery

Post by Hugh Akston » 18 May 2016, 23:54

Fin Fang Foom wrote:Pretty sure the Captain Marvel movie will be about the current girl version.
No question. I just wonder if they're going to do a Ms. Marvel movie as well with the extremely popular Muslim teenager version.
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Re: Horrible, Offensive Geekery

Post by dbcooper » 26 Jun 2016, 06:51

Eurostile type in sci-fi films and TV:

https://typesetinthefuture.com/2014/11/ ... eurostile/
Slip inside a sleeping bag.

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Re: Horrible, Offensive Geekery

Post by thoreau » 28 Jun 2016, 23:33

Image

Also:
"ike Wile E. Coyote salivating over a "4000 Ways To Prepare Roadrunner" cookbook without watching his surroundings, the Road Runner of Societal Inertia snuck up on them both and beepbeeped them off the mesa."
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Re: Horrible, Offensive Geekery

Post by Painboy » 09 Jul 2016, 20:24

Various old disk drives play the Star Wars theme. The nerdiness of this is borderline weaponized.


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Re: Horrible, Offensive Geekery

Post by Warren » 09 Jul 2016, 23:59

I'm embarrassed to confess that I don't know what "envelope simulation" is.
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Re: Horrible, Offensive Geekery

Post by thoreau » 28 Aug 2016, 15:45

I would like to see Chvrches cover the music of Robotech.

I'm pretty sure they could do an awesome version of "Look up! The sky is falling!"
"ike Wile E. Coyote salivating over a "4000 Ways To Prepare Roadrunner" cookbook without watching his surroundings, the Road Runner of Societal Inertia snuck up on them both and beepbeeped them off the mesa."
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Re: Horrible, Offensive Geekery

Post by thoreau » 13 Sep 2016, 19:29

"ike Wile E. Coyote salivating over a "4000 Ways To Prepare Roadrunner" cookbook without watching his surroundings, the Road Runner of Societal Inertia snuck up on them both and beepbeeped them off the mesa."
--Shem

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Re: Horrible, Offensive Geekery

Post by thoreau » 05 Jan 2017, 02:59

I got myself the Cthulhu version of Munchkin for Christmas. Other than the amusing cultist class it's basically the same as regular Munchkin, but the cards are slightly more amusing.

We teamed up to defeat Cthulhu himself when we were at fairly low levels. Good times.
"ike Wile E. Coyote salivating over a "4000 Ways To Prepare Roadrunner" cookbook without watching his surroundings, the Road Runner of Societal Inertia snuck up on them both and beepbeeped them off the mesa."
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Re: Horrible, Offensive Geekery

Post by Eric the .5b » 31 Mar 2017, 19:29

Man, I hate the gatekeeper shit some geeks pull, especially when the would-be gatekeeper is stupid.

<Discussion of Batgirl wanders over to the "It was weird to have Barbara Gordon paralyzed for a couple of decades when she was on first-name basis with a dozen people who could cure her with magic, super-technology, etc." thing>

"Hurr hurr! That's a little thing called suspension of disbelief, and in the Gotham section of DC comics, things are totes more realistic, and if you can't handle that, maybe superhero comics aren't for you."

"No, dumbass. Over half the "realistic" Bat-characters have been cured of paralysis or literally raised from the dead. Jason Todd is walking around because somebody punched time. Barbara Gordon got shot and paralyzed and stayed paralyzed because she was the hero of a comic that got cancelled. If the Suicide Squad writers in the 80s hadn't had the bright idea of her becoming Oracle, she'd just be a background character wheeled out whenever it was time to play up scary and evil the Joker is. And later writers came up with cockamamie justifications for why she didn't want a magical, etc. treatment, because they thought it would be cheap to give the character a one-off cure for a real problem lots of people have to live with. It's still weird, though, not least because it plays up the cheapness of all the other characters getting out of those problems."
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Re: Horrible, Offensive Geekery

Post by Aresen » 03 May 2017, 19:26

Question: Does Plastic Man have to use condoms when he has sex?
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Re: Horrible, Offensive Geekery

Post by Warren » 03 May 2017, 19:47

Eric the .5b wrote:That's a little thing called suspension of disbelief
The way that works is, I'm willing to suspend my disbelief over whatever the author requires. You say you have a dude that can fly or go back in time, I'm down. But once you make the rules for your world, you've got to live by those rules. So if Superdude heals somebody with the power of his mind on Monday, you can't ask me to believe he's gonna sit on the couch when his BFF is paralyzed on Tuesday.
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Re: Horrible, Offensive Geekery

Post by D.A. Ridgely » 03 May 2017, 23:11

Aresen wrote:Question: Does Plastic Man have to use condoms when he has sex?
Do shepherds have to use lambskins?

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Re: Horrible, Offensive Geekery

Post by Sandy » 04 May 2017, 09:06

D.A. Ridgely wrote:
Aresen wrote:Question: Does Plastic Man have to use condoms when he has sex?
Do shepherds have to use lambskins?
Only ones named Jared.
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Re: Horrible, Offensive Geekery

Post by lunchstealer » 12 May 2017, 20:18

Holy shit you guys. This is real, and has content from within the past week.

http://androgums.org
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Re: Horrible, Offensive Geekery

Post by Dangerman » 13 May 2017, 12:15

As promised, I am horrified and offended by everything about that link.

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Re: Horrible, Offensive Geekery

Post by Jennifer » 01 Jul 2017, 00:40

Random thought: how different would human biology be, had we, our close primate cousins and our pre-homo sapien ancestors evolved in the southeastern US rather than the African savannas? Humans (theoretically) cool down via perspiration -- IIRC horses are the only other non-primate animals to sweat, rather than cool down via panting, having blood flow through thinner body parts to let body heat radiate out (as do those elephant species with very large, thin ears), or similar things. And this cooldown method is definitely supposed to be better than panting, because it gives us a lot more stamina: so long as we still have water to keep hydrated, we can keep going FAR longer than a pant-to-cooldown animal can. I recently read about "pursuit predation," which our savanna ancestors are believed to have practiced: though animals such as cheetahs, gazelles and other creatures we presumably used to hunt can definitely outrun us in the short term, in the long term we actually overtake them: not by running, but simply by following and tracking them at an easy walking pace. They'd beat us in any hundred-yard dash, but we'd beat them in a marathon. Hours later, when the prey animal has to stop and pant to cool down, those sweaty human hunters would still be chugging along after them. From the animals' perspective it would've been like us being chased by zombies: they're slow and sluggish and you can outrun them easily in the short term, but sooner or later you're going to get tired, and meanwhile that slow sluggish monster chasing after you still keeps on going.

Anyway, the process "perspire, then the sweat evaporates and draws heat away as it does" presumably works very well in the arid savanna (provided you drink enough to replace the water you lose -- even if that water is as warm as the surrounding air). But it completely backfires in humid Georgia summertime, where sweat won't evaporate until you step indoors where it's air-conditioned. Pursuit predation would NOT work here. Even ordinary "sweating to cool down" doesn't work in the natural environment here: when I'm outside, the only thing that cools me down is sips from the ice water bottle I always carry, and ice water on 90-degree days does not exist naturally in Georgia: THAT requires technology barely a century old. But just "sweating" on its own doesn't cool you off on a typical hot-n-humid day; at best it just makes you feel gross and at worst it could actually make you hotter, as you end up simmering in your own juices.

So had primates and our ancestors evolved in a humid-hot rather than dry-hot environment, we would not have evolved perspiration. Maybe we'd pant to cool down, or maybe we'd have enormous-n-thin elephant ears, or our ancestors would only have been able to live in places where they could submerge themselves in water (or cover themselves with mud as pigs do) several times per day. They couldn't have done pursuit predation, which would've limited what animals they could've hunted, unless they/we evolved some other method of hunting: the ability to run very fast for short bursts of time, perhaps? But with more energy directed toward things like stronger leg and heart muscles -- whatever actual biological changes would be necessary, for the average person to be able to short-term run as fast as the average "fast" animal -- that would leave less energy available to nurture the growth and development of our super-big, super-smart brains....
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Re: Horrible, Offensive Geekery

Post by Aresen » 01 Jul 2017, 00:51

Jennifer wrote:Random thought: how different would human biology be, had we, our close primate cousins and our pre-homo sapien ancestors evolved in the southeastern US rather than the African savannas?
The first thing that comes to mind is that the human species would be considerably more inbred.
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Re: Horrible, Offensive Geekery

Post by lunchstealer » 01 Jul 2017, 02:03

Jennifer wrote:Random thought: how different would human biology be, had we, our close primate cousins and our pre-homo sapien ancestors evolved in the southeastern US rather than the African savannas? Humans (theoretically) cool down via perspiration -- IIRC horses are the only other non-primate animals to sweat, rather than cool down via panting, having blood flow through thinner body parts to let body heat radiate out (as do those elephant species with very large, thin ears), or similar things. And this cooldown method is definitely supposed to be better than panting, because it gives us a lot more stamina: so long as we still have water to keep hydrated, we can keep going FAR longer than a pant-to-cooldown animal can. I recently read about "pursuit predation," which our savanna ancestors are believed to have practiced: though animals such as cheetahs, gazelles and other creatures we presumably used to hunt can definitely outrun us in the short term, in the long term we actually overtake them: not by running, but simply by following and tracking them at an easy walking pace. They'd beat us in any hundred-yard dash, but we'd beat them in a marathon. Hours later, when the prey animal has to stop and pant to cool down, those sweaty human hunters would still be chugging along after them. From the animals' perspective it would've been like us being chased by zombies: they're slow and sluggish and you can outrun them easily in the short term, but sooner or later you're going to get tired, and meanwhile that slow sluggish monster chasing after you still keeps on going.

Anyway, the process "perspire, then the sweat evaporates and draws heat away as it does" presumably works very well in the arid savanna (provided you drink enough to replace the water you lose -- even if that water is as warm as the surrounding air). But it completely backfires in humid Georgia summertime, where sweat won't evaporate until you step indoors where it's air-conditioned. Pursuit predation would NOT work here. Even ordinary "sweating to cool down" doesn't work in the natural environment here: when I'm outside, the only thing that cools me down is sips from the ice water bottle I always carry, and ice water on 90-degree days does not exist naturally in Georgia: THAT requires technology barely a century old. But just "sweating" on its own doesn't cool you off on a typical hot-n-humid day; at best it just makes you feel gross and at worst it could actually make you hotter, as you end up simmering in your own juices.

So had primates and our ancestors evolved in a humid-hot rather than dry-hot environment, we would not have evolved perspiration. Maybe we'd pant to cool down, or maybe we'd have enormous-n-thin elephant ears, or our ancestors would only have been able to live in places where they could submerge themselves in water (or cover themselves with mud as pigs do) several times per day. They couldn't have done pursuit predation, which would've limited what animals they could've hunted, unless they/we evolved some other method of hunting: the ability to run very fast for short bursts of time, perhaps? But with more energy directed toward things like stronger leg and heart muscles -- whatever actual biological changes would be necessary, for the average person to be able to short-term run as fast as the average "fast" animal -- that would leave less energy available to nurture the growth and development of our super-big, super-smart brains....
So in that case humans would've evolved in the Southwest rather than Southeast, sounds like, since upright bipedalism isn't probably great for ambush/burst hunting.

However, wolves come close to being pursuit hunters, and they pant, so ... maybe?
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Re: Horrible, Offensive Geekery

Post by Jennifer » 01 Jul 2017, 02:40

So in that case humans would've evolved in the Southwest rather than Southeast, sounds like, since upright bipedalism isn't probably great for ambush/burst hunting.

However, wolves come close to being pursuit hunters, and they pant, so ... maybe?
I think the Southwest would've been too arid for any hominids to evolve, though -- at least large social-animal ones. (Though, of course, if they didn't sweat, they'd need a lot less water per pound of body weight to survive.) How many large warm-blooded animals, regardless of cooldown methods, live in hot regions that aren't merely arid, but desert? If no-sweat hominids evolved in the desert, the only way I can see that working out is if they were nocturnal, and stayed cool by hiding from the daytime heat -- after the first primates came down from the trees, they'd immediately start digging underground burrows.

Based on the sweatiness of other high primates, I'm guessing that homos erectus and habilis perspired, and so did the australopithecenes before them.

The only disadvantages of sweating compared to other cooling methods (again, assuming a climate dry enough for sweat to evaporate) is that it requires far more water, and presumably also more salt to replace what you sweat out. Everything else is a biological advantage compared to other methods: provided you have the water to drink, you can go a lot longer without a cooldown break compared to the panters, can work harder/generate more heat than the radiant-heat losers such as big-eared elephants; you also have more freedom of movement compared to animals which have to stop for a dip in water or mud to cool down.

But if the hominids and pre-hominid primates had evolved in a humid climate, they never would've evolved perspiration; I suppose a simpler way to word my earlier musing is: how many of the evolutionary traits which eventually led to modern homo sapiens require perspiration? Pursuit predation on the savanna requires it, but did PP come before or after intelligence? Homo erectus is known to have had fire, and homo habilis made stone tools (hence its name: "handy man."). I recall reading that our pre-human, pre-"homo" ancestors walked upright before they got intelligent (certainly there's nothing to indicate any australopithecenes were very bright); the first advantages of walking upright was that our ancestors could see further, and I also read speculation that it kept them cooler (only the top of the head under direct noon sunlight, rather than the entirety of the back); only after the earliest hominids were used to having those two limbs not being used for locomotion did they start evolving the intelligence to do useful things with them. And a meaty protein diet also contributed to larger brain development; if we couldn't sweat, and couldn't do pursuit predation, would our ancestors have been able to get enough meat to evolve those big brains, or would we always have been omnivores who mostly ate plants, with only the occasional insect, small animal or scavenged corpse to provide protein (but not enough to evolve big brains)? Would we even have developed enough intelligence to reach the primitive stone tool/homo habilis level, without sweating -- without having an environment dry enough for sweat to evolve in the first place, in other words?
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Re: Horrible, Offensive Geekery

Post by Jennifer » 01 Jul 2017, 02:50

Whoops! Big mistake I made in my two previous posts (though not so big as to negate my "We HAD to sweat" theory"): what our ancestors did was NOT "pursuit predation," but "persistence hunting." (Except for a further Google-check which occasionally uses the two terms interchangeably). But it's the same thing I mentioned before: you're generally slower than your prey in the short term, but you outlast it in the long run because the prey tired out before you do. From the wiki:
Humans are the only surviving primate species who practice persistence hunting. In addition to a capacity for endurance running, human hunters have comparatively little hair, which makes sweating an effective means of cooling the body.[2] Meanwhile, ungulates and other mammals may need to pant to cool down enough,[2] which also means that they must slow down.[3]
But of course, what made sweating an effective means of cooling the body is not just relative hairlessness, but being in an environment dry enough for sweat to evaporate. And that environment sure as HELL is not to be found where I live nowadays.

Persistence hunting was likely one of a number of tactics used by early hominins,[3][5] and could have been practised with[6] or without[7] projectile weapons such as darts, spears, or slings.
As hominins adapted to bipedalism they would have lost some speed, becoming less able to catch prey with short, fast charges. They would, however, have gained endurance and become better adapted to persistence hunting.[3][4][8] Although many mammals sweat, few have evolved to use sweating for effective thermoregulation, humans and horses being notable exceptions. This coupled with relative hairlessness would have given human hunters an additional advantage by keeping their bodies cool in the midday heat.
Current practice
The persistence hunt is still practiced by hunter-gatherers in the central Kalahari Desert in Southern Africa, and David Attenborough's documentary The Life of Mammals (program 10, "Food For Thought") showed a bushman hunting a kudu antelope until it collapsed.[9] It is thought that the Tarahumara natives of northwestern Mexico in the Copper Canyon area may have also practiced persistence hunting.[10] The procedure is not to spear the antelope or kudu from a distance, but to run it down in the midday heat, for about two to five hours over 25 to 35 km (16 to 22 mi) in temperatures of about 40 to 42 °C (104 to 108 °F). The hunter chases the kudu, which then runs away out of sight. By tracking it down at a fast running pace the hunter catches up with it before it has had enough time to rest in the shade. The animal is repeatedly chased and tracked down until it is too exhausted to continue running. The hunter then kills it at close range with a spear.

Persistence hunting has even been used against the fastest land animal, the cheetah. In November 2013, four Somali-Kenyan herdsmen from northeast Kenya successfully used persistence hunting in the heat of the day to capture cheetahs who had been killing their goats.[11]

There is evidence that Western peoples, in the absence of hunting tools, have reverted to persistence hunting, such as the case of the Lykov family in Siberia.[12]
So: definitely persistence hunting in Africa, maybe in parts of Mexico, and possibly in Siberia where staying cool wasn't as much of an issue.

That said, a blog from Rochester Institute of Technology uses "pursuit predation" the way I did in my first two posts (though the blogger might have used the term incorrectly, as I did):

http://www.rit.edu/emcs/admissions/bca/ ... -predators
Humans are one of only two pursuit predators known to man. Most other predators either ambush their prey like a lion or chase their prey down over a short distance, like a cheetah. Since most animals can outrun us humans were believed to hunt by approaching an animal until it ran away. Then approaching it again. And again. And again. Sooner or later the animal who be to exhausted to run any more and then it was dinner time.
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Re: Horrible, Offensive Geekery

Post by Kolohe » 01 Jul 2017, 03:58

I think both the North American Southwest and the East African Rift Valley were somewhat wetter during the period when Hominids arose than both those areas are now.
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Re: Horrible, Offensive Geekery

Post by Jennifer » 01 Jul 2017, 04:22

The Sahara was grassland for a couple thousand years after the last ice age ended, so I'm sure the rift valley wasn't remotely as desolate as it is now either. But it couldn't have been humid the way Georgia is now*; the air was dry enough that sweat could actually evaporate and cool you down, not stay put and make you simmer.

It's just something I never thought about before: how much of the evolution that makes us "human" would not have been possible, if instead of "sweating" as a cooldown mechanism, our pre-human ancestors had to either pant, radiate heat, or physically dunk their bodies into cooler substances?

*When I got home from today's walk, I saw that I'd actually perspired through one side of my straw sun hat. And high temperatures have still only been in the 80s! When they get up to the 90s in a couple weeks, I dunno if even the combination of my new sun-blocking clothes and the "found-money game" will get me out of this apartment unless I absolutely have to go someplace. But I hope so, because staying indoors all the time really isn't healthy -- even when the heat and humidity outside drives you to such insane thoughts as "Hmm, so, I wonder how much of our humanity ultimately stems from our sweat glands, huh?"
"Myself, despite what they say about libertarians, I think we're actually allowed to pursue options beyond futility or sucking the dicks of the powerful." -- Eric the .5b

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