On the modern electric guitar

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Andrew
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by Andrew » 05 Feb 2019, 20:14

JD wrote:
29 Jan 2019, 13:59
Andrew wrote:
27 Jan 2019, 17:55
I said screw it and went to the local shop and bought this. It was a little more than I wanted to spend, but this way I avoided dealing with weirdos on craigslist, pawn shops, or Guitar Center. Jaguar body + full scale + PJ pickups = take my money.
Nice! I've got the short scale version of that, not being as regular of a bassist. There's something to be said for the long scale, though. I'm curious to know if you find the J pickup to be oddly lifeless, or if that weakness is specific to the ss version.
I'm running everything through Rocksmith right now, so it's tough to say. If I'm consistent enough with practice, I'll get a proper amp in a few months. My guess is that the J is kinda lifeless because that's my assumption about J pickups.
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JD
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by JD » 04 Mar 2019, 14:51

Another Thunderbird came up for a really good price locally, so I sold my short-scale bass and got the Thunderbird. The neck dive is truly horrendous, though. I can't even imagine how a product makes it to the manufacturing stage without somebody saying "You know, guys..." Fortunately I will mostly be playing sitting down so it's not a big deal, plus there are some fixes for it.

It is a pretty huge instrument, but I think playing the short-scale bass helped me adjust; going directly to a long-scale bass might have been too much. The hardest thing to adjust to is just the overall size of the instrument - I'm used to moving around in my room with a regular guitar, and I keep knocking into things.
I sort of feel like a sucker about aspiring to be intellectually rigorous when I could just go on twitter and say capitalism causes space herpes and no one will challenge me on it. - Hugh Akston

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Andrew
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by Andrew » 04 Mar 2019, 15:59

JD wrote:
04 Mar 2019, 14:51
Another Thunderbird came up for a really good price locally, so I sold my short-scale bass and got the Thunderbird. The neck dive is truly horrendous, though. I can't even imagine how a product makes it to the manufacturing stage without somebody saying "You know, guys..." Fortunately I will mostly be playing sitting down so it's not a big deal, plus there are some fixes for it.

It is a pretty huge instrument, but I think playing the short-scale bass helped me adjust; going directly to a long-scale bass might have been too much. The hardest thing to adjust to is just the overall size of the instrument - I'm used to moving around in my room with a regular guitar, and I keep knocking into things.
I haven't held a Thunderbird, but pics look like it might be even bigger than what I bought. The Jaguar I bought already makes a regular guitar feel like a child's toy, so I can only imagine what that thing feels like.
We live in the fucked age. Get used to it. - dhex

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JD
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by JD » 04 Mar 2019, 16:31

Andrew wrote:
04 Mar 2019, 15:59
I haven't held a Thunderbird, but pics look like it might be even bigger than what I bought. The Jaguar I bought already makes a regular guitar feel like a child's toy, so I can only imagine what that thing feels like.
I'm not sure, but I think it might be bigger. It wouldn't fit in a coffin case for bass, which is a pretty damn big case. I was able to remove an internal separator in the case and then it fit with room to spare, but I was startled that it was about an inch too long for the unmodified case.
I sort of feel like a sucker about aspiring to be intellectually rigorous when I could just go on twitter and say capitalism causes space herpes and no one will challenge me on it. - Hugh Akston

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JD
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by JD » 01 Aug 2019, 11:47

Reason addresses one of our favorite topics, foreign-manufactured guitars: https://reason.com/2019/07/31/elizabeth ... ic-guitar/

Nothing really new or surprising there, but it's nice to see them mention it.

In other news, I fixed the neck dive on the Thunderbird by relocating the strap pin to the neck plate, and took the opportunity to replace the dangerously small original pin with a Well-HungTM Pro-Pin.
I sort of feel like a sucker about aspiring to be intellectually rigorous when I could just go on twitter and say capitalism causes space herpes and no one will challenge me on it. - Hugh Akston

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Number 6
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by Number 6 » 01 Aug 2019, 12:51

JD wrote:
01 Aug 2019, 11:47
Reason addresses one of our favorite topics, foreign-manufactured guitars: https://reason.com/2019/07/31/elizabeth ... ic-guitar/

Nothing really new or surprising there, but it's nice to see them mention it.
"No mass-market American guitar company exclusively sells American-made guitars because American musicians can't and won't pay for them."
Is Martin not considered mass market? They're certainly not cheap, but the prices of lower-range Martins aren't far off from those quoted for Mexican Fenders. Taylor seems to exist in roughly the same market space, and also appears to make their guitars in the US.

ETA: It looks like Taylor does have a factory in Mexico.
" i discovered you eat dog dicks out of a bowl marked "dog dicks" because you're too stupid to remember where you left your bowl of dog dicks."-dhex, of course.
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JD
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by JD » 01 Aug 2019, 13:17

Number 6 wrote:
01 Aug 2019, 12:51
"No mass-market American guitar company exclusively sells American-made guitars because American musicians can't and won't pay for them."
Is Martin not considered mass market? They're certainly not cheap, but the prices of lower-range Martins aren't far off from those quoted for Mexican Fenders. Taylor seems to exist in roughly the same market space, and also appears to make their guitars in the US.

ETA: It looks like Taylor does have a factory in Mexico.
Looks like Martin has a factory in Mexico too: https://www.prnewswire.com/news-release ... 07911.html

Interesting tidbit from that article:
Unlike many other U.S. companies that have opened manufacturing sites overseas, Martin has never laid off any of its U.S. workforce as a result of opening and expanding the Navojoa factory.
I sort of feel like a sucker about aspiring to be intellectually rigorous when I could just go on twitter and say capitalism causes space herpes and no one will challenge me on it. - Hugh Akston

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D.A. Ridgely
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by D.A. Ridgely » 01 Aug 2019, 18:00

After a certain point, high end acoustic guitar prices are a function of cosmetics, e.g., exotic woods and inlays. Below a certain point, otoh, though with rare exceptions, cheaper guitars are simply unplayable. Yeah, a Martin D-28 will set you back a couple thousand dollars, but you'll never be able to claim it's the guitar's fault when whatever you're trying to play doesn't sound good.

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Number 6
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by Number 6 » 01 Aug 2019, 18:18

D.A. Ridgely wrote:
01 Aug 2019, 18:00
After a certain point, high end acoustic guitar prices are a function of cosmetics, e.g., exotic woods and inlays. Below a certain point, otoh, though with rare exceptions, cheaper guitars are simply unplayable. Yeah, a Martin D-28 will set you back a couple thousand dollars, but you'll never be able to claim it's the guitar's fault when whatever you're trying to play doesn't sound good.
For me, that's a good reason to never buy a Martin.
" i discovered you eat dog dicks out of a bowl marked "dog dicks" because you're too stupid to remember where you left your bowl of dog dicks."-dhex, of course.
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D.A. Ridgely
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by D.A. Ridgely » 01 Aug 2019, 18:27

Number 6 wrote:
01 Aug 2019, 18:18
D.A. Ridgely wrote:
01 Aug 2019, 18:00
After a certain point, high end acoustic guitar prices are a function of cosmetics, e.g., exotic woods and inlays. Below a certain point, otoh, though with rare exceptions, cheaper guitars are simply unplayable. Yeah, a Martin D-28 will set you back a couple thousand dollars, but you'll never be able to claim it's the guitar's fault when whatever you're trying to play doesn't sound good.
For me, that's a good reason to never buy a Martin.
... and that's why I got mine as a Christmas gift!

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Jadagul
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by Jadagul » 01 Aug 2019, 18:53

Okay, so this is a dumb question, but y'all might have some insight into it.

I have a medium-nice classical acoustic-electric guitar, and I'd been supporting it on a cheap stand I got from an ex-girlfriend.

I also have a roomba. These two things have not typically interacted very well, and at the most recent interaction the guitar got knocked over and a tuning peg got snapped off.

Obviously I need to take the guitar into the shop to get the tuning peg replaced. But does anyone have good advice on a stand that won't have the same issue? I can wall-mount the guitar, obviously, but a floor stand would be simpler if I can find one that will work well.

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Highway
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by Highway » 01 Aug 2019, 19:16

Which kind of stand is it? Is it an a-frame stand or a three-legs and a gooseneck kind of stand? I prefer A-frame stands (and the Amazon Basics ones are actually really nice), they're weighty, and they won't get pushed around by a roomba, and the legs extend out front a little bit. If you want a 3 legs and a gooseneck stand, you can get ones that will capture the neck of the guitar so it doesn't get knocked off.

The main question is does the roomba knock the stand over with the guitar, or does it knock the guitar out of the stand while not moving the stand?
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Jadagul
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by Jadagul » 01 Aug 2019, 19:50

It's a three-leg stand, which actually causes all sorts of issues for the Roomba--which also has a tendency to climb up one of the legs and then get stuck. The roomba was knocking over the entire stand the few times this came up, but I was also slightly concerned about whether it bumping into the guitar was a bad thing.

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D.A. Ridgely
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by D.A. Ridgely » 01 Aug 2019, 20:28

Jadagul wrote:
01 Aug 2019, 19:50
It's a three-leg stand, which actually causes all sorts of issues for the Roomba--which also has a tendency to climb up one of the legs and then get stuck. The roomba was knocking over the entire stand the few times this came up, but I was also slightly concerned about whether it bumping into the guitar was a bad thing.
I doubt the Roomba is hurting the guitar by bumping into it, but it's not doing it any good. I'd probably wall mount the guitar, if I were you. You can buy weighted stands with a heavy base and guitar saddles but, really, is it worth it? I wouldn't risk even a semi-decent guitar getting damaged because no stand is designed to get bumped into with any significant force, nor do any I know of keep the guitar raised more than a foot or so off the ground.

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JD
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by JD » 02 Aug 2019, 11:53

Jadagul wrote:
01 Aug 2019, 19:50
It's a three-leg stand
I second the recommendation for the A-frame stands. I'm not that familiar with Roombas, but I doubt they'd be climbing up it. The only things I don't completely like about the A-frames are
- They don't do as well with unusual or asymmetrical body shapes
- Because there's nothing holding the neck, it is possible for the guitar for the guitar to get bumped sideways off the stand, although it is less likely than you might think.

Picture should be below:
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I sort of feel like a sucker about aspiring to be intellectually rigorous when I could just go on twitter and say capitalism causes space herpes and no one will challenge me on it. - Hugh Akston

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Jake
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by Jake » 02 Aug 2019, 13:53

JD wrote:
02 Aug 2019, 11:53
- Because there's nothing holding the neck, it is possible for the guitar for the guitar to get bumped sideways off the stand, although it is less likely than you might think.
A liberal application of epoxy should largely eliminate this risk.
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