On the modern electric guitar

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Warren
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by Warren »

JD wrote:
17 Oct 2019, 13:14
Andrew wrote:
16 Oct 2019, 07:47
Tuco wrote:
16 Oct 2019, 06:25
[She called me to tell me this. She's not dumb, but she is a bass player.
Stereotypes are a real time-saver.
...so this rock band is getting to play their first big stadium show. And the whole band is just in awe while they're playing to the cheering crowd. The guitarist is thinking, "This is so great, I'm going to be on the cover of magazines and I'm going to be a guitar legend."
And the lead singer is thinking, "This is great, look at all these groupies, I'm going to get laid so much."
And the drummer is thinking, "This is awesome, we're going to make so much money, I'm going to buy myself a mansion, and I'll have an endorsement deal."
And the bassist is thinking, "A, A, A, A, G, G, G, G..."
So what you're saying is, The only member of the band focused on his work is the bass player.
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JD
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by JD »

Warren wrote:
18 Oct 2019, 12:07
So what you're saying is, The only member of the band focused on his work is the bass player.
:-P

So this European explorer is going down a river deep in Central Africa with his native guide, their raft drifting down this dark, slow-moving, green river, the trees almost completely blocking out the light. And they start to hear these drums in the distance, going boom, boom, boom.
The explorer says, "I don't like the sound of those drums." But the guide says, "No worry. Drums good."

They keep drifting down the river, deeper into the jungle, and the drums get louder and faster. The explorer says, "I really don't like the sound of those drums!" and the guide just shakes his head and says, "Drums good, drums good."

As they keep going the drums get even louder and more insistent, and the explorer says, "I really do not like the sound of those drums at all! Are you sure it's OK?!" and the guide says "Drums all good! Only bad when drums stop!"
The explorer cries out, "Why? What happens when the drums stop?" And the guide looks him in the eye and says..."Bass solo."
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Tuco
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by Tuco »

What's the difference betweed a guitar player and god? God doesn't think he's a guitarist.

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Andrew
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by Andrew »

Guitar gear counts for this thread, right?

I rediscovered this footage of The Who from Tanglewood in July 1970 (there's also footage of the opening act, Jethro Tull). There's only the opening 55 minutes of video on YT, but the whole audio exists. Unlike the Isle of Wight footage, it's shot from several mostly-static cameras with no obnoxious jumps/zooms every 2 seconds.

It's the usual excellent performance from The Who of the era, but I like the video because you can see the gear. Both Townshend and Entwistle are using 3 Hiwatt amplifiers and 2 double stacks of speakers. I cannot even imagine how loud that was on stage yet they're playing with no stage monitors. They were playing the same show every night, but that's still impressive to hold it together when they probably can't hear each other.
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JD
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by JD »

Andrew wrote:
20 Nov 2019, 19:10
It's the usual excellent performance from The Who of the era, but I like the video because you can see the gear. Both Townshend and Entwistle are using 3 Hiwatt amplifiers and 2 double stacks of speakers. I cannot even imagine how loud that was on stage yet they're playing with no stage monitors. They were playing the same show every night, but that's still impressive to hold it together when they probably can't hear each other.
That's pretty crazy. I see that the drums are miked, so I can only imagine that the guitar amps are too, although I can't really make it out. If they're not miked, that would explain why they need so much of a backline, of course, but still. I don't know if the fake wall of amps was a thing at that point or not, but I think not. And now they can't hear each other because of the tinnitus and hearing loss!
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JD
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by JD »

And this thread reminded me: I am going to take a class in intermediate-beginner bass, so hopefully I don't pick up a ton of bad habits on the bass and I can actually play bass like a bassist instead of like a guitarist.

I've also been casting a wistful eye towards Jaguar basses again. My old Jaguar SS was OK but I really wanted a standard-scale bass. And while I like my Thunderbird, the Jaguars with the P/J configuration are pretty cool. Unfortunately it does not help that over the last few years, Fender and Squier have made them in 30", 32", and 34" scale, and people advertising one for sale rarely bother to say which it is. :-P
I sort of feel like a sucker about aspiring to be intellectually rigorous when I could just go on twitter and say capitalism causes space herpes and no one will challenge me on it. - Hugh Akston

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Andrew
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by Andrew »

JD wrote:
20 Nov 2019, 20:43
I've also been casting a wistful eye towards Jaguar basses again. My old Jaguar SS was OK but I really wanted a standard-scale bass. And while I like my Thunderbird, the Jaguars with the P/J configuration are pretty cool. Unfortunately it does not help that over the last few years, Fender and Squier have made them in 30", 32", and 34" scale, and people advertising one for sale rarely bother to say which it is. :-P
I was going to suggest the Squier Jaguar that I have, but it looks like it's already been discontinued. This one appears to be the same one that I have (the 34"). Otherwise, all I see are full-price Fender Jaguars.
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D.A. Ridgely
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by D.A. Ridgely »

It occurs to me that guitars (including electric basses) are pretty much the only instruments people collect. A professional horn player might well own several trumpets or whatever, but it is guitarists in particular who often end up owning over a dozen different guitars.

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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by Andrew »

D.A. Ridgely wrote:
24 Nov 2019, 13:02
It occurs to me that guitars (including electric basses) are pretty much the only instruments people collect. A professional horn player might well own several trumpets or whatever, but it is guitarists in particular who often end up owning over a dozen different guitars.
I can think of at least 2 books off the top of my head documenting bass collections (one of Entwistle's and one of Geddy Lee's) and I know there are several documenting guitar collections, but I'd certainly be surprised to learn of similar books for trumpets, violas, etc.
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

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Some drummers will have multiple sets, and almost all will, over time, collect cymbals and the like. I've got an acoustic kit, an electronic one, and several hand drums.
I don't really play bass or guitar (though I try), but I own two basses*, an electric guitar**, and an acoustic.***

*Squire J-bass and an off brand called a Johnson
** Squire strat
*Washburn Acoustic/Electric
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JD
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by JD »

Andrew wrote:
24 Nov 2019, 08:27
I was going to suggest the Squier Jaguar that I have, but it looks like it's already been discontinued. This one appears to be the same one that I have (the 34"). Otherwise, all I see are full-price Fender Jaguars.
That one has the "bass boost" feature and takes a 9V battery, right? Does it require the battery, or does it work without one too?
I sort of feel like a sucker about aspiring to be intellectually rigorous when I could just go on twitter and say capitalism causes space herpes and no one will challenge me on it. - Hugh Akston

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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by Andrew »

JD wrote:
25 Nov 2019, 13:06
Andrew wrote:
24 Nov 2019, 08:27
I was going to suggest the Squier Jaguar that I have, but it looks like it's already been discontinued. This one appears to be the same one that I have (the 34"). Otherwise, all I see are full-price Fender Jaguars.
That one has the "bass boost" feature and takes a 9V battery, right? Does it require the battery, or does it work without one too?
Yes, it has the boost, which mostly translates to active pickups that require a 9V battery.
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JD
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by JD »

Tried a Fender Precision Lyte bass at a used-gear store the other day and really liked it, except for the finish, which was a kind of muddy "amber-burst" with no flame. P/J pickups, J-style neck (or even thinner, maybe), and a body like a slightly reduced P body. I might go for it except for the color.

Missed out on what was in retrospect an awesome deal on a newish Fender Aerodyne Deluxe bass too.
I sort of feel like a sucker about aspiring to be intellectually rigorous when I could just go on twitter and say capitalism causes space herpes and no one will challenge me on it. - Hugh Akston

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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by Andrew »

JD wrote:
07 Jan 2020, 10:58
Tried a Fender Precision Lyte bass at a used-gear store the other day and really liked it, except for the finish, which was a kind of muddy "amber-burst" with no flame. P/J pickups, J-style neck (or even thinner, maybe), and a body like a slightly reduced P body. I might go for it except for the color.

Missed out on what was in retrospect an awesome deal on a newish Fender Aerodyne Deluxe bass too.
I think you need a Travis Bean bass:

https://reverb.com/item/30661584-travis ... 0-koa-1976
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JD
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by JD »

Andrew wrote:
09 Jan 2020, 09:15
JD wrote:
07 Jan 2020, 10:58
Tried a Fender Precision Lyte bass at a used-gear store the other day and really liked it, except for the finish, which was a kind of muddy "amber-burst" with no flame. P/J pickups, J-style neck (or even thinner, maybe), and a body like a slightly reduced P body. I might go for it except for the color.

Missed out on what was in retrospect an awesome deal on a newish Fender Aerodyne Deluxe bass too.
I think you need a Travis Bean bass:

https://reverb.com/item/30661584-travis ... 0-koa-1976
I was really thinking more like this one:
https://reverb.com/item/29459070-jackso ... loor-model
I sort of feel like a sucker about aspiring to be intellectually rigorous when I could just go on twitter and say capitalism causes space herpes and no one will challenge me on it. - Hugh Akston

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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by Andrew »

Speaking of guitars, I regularly listen to Roy Buchanan on YouTube. I don't claim to have heard every song of his, but I think I've seen every video of his on there (actual video, not a song playing over images).

Not only that, I listen to music like the Jimmy Bryant & Speedy West albums, Chet Atkins, and all the random videos of the country guys who could play like hell when they felt like it (Glen Campbell, Jerry Reed, Don Rich, Roy Clark, etc.)

Somehow, with all that data, it had never recommended Jim Campilongo to me. I found him instead by reading a random article somewhere. Your recommendation system is garbage, YouTube.
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Highway
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by Highway »

This isn't really about an electric guitar, but after watching Rick Beato's videos about using lighter gauge strings, I decided to try using .010 - .050 strings on my acoustic, instead of the 12s that I think it had on it. So far I like the feel, and might consider putting lighter strings on my electric also. Right now I use 10 to 52s, so my acoustic actually has lighter strings than my electric at the moment.
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JD
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by JD »

Highway wrote:
23 Feb 2020, 20:06
This isn't really about an electric guitar, but after watching Rick Beato's videos about using lighter gauge strings, I decided to try using .010 - .050 strings on my acoustic, instead of the 12s that I think it had on it. So far I like the feel, and might consider putting lighter strings on my electric also. Right now I use 10 to 52s, so my acoustic actually has lighter strings than my electric at the moment.
I can understand it. For a long time I was all on the "heavier strings = MOAR TONEZ" bandwagon, but a few years back I was generally burned out and needed to change things up, and I tried .008s. I eventually went to .009s, because the 8s were just a little too light, but I'm now a believer in lighter strings. I don't know how it works for acoustics, but it sounds like you're satisfied.
I sort of feel like a sucker about aspiring to be intellectually rigorous when I could just go on twitter and say capitalism causes space herpes and no one will challenge me on it. - Hugh Akston

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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by Highway »

The real key is the lower effort required to play. I found with just some playing around that I was getting better fret contact on difficult chords and less buzz, and because I wasn't having to strangle the neck, it made my hands hurt less.
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by JD »

A used Rickenbacker 4003 has come up locally for a really good price. Of course, "really good price" for a Rick 4003 is still "a hell of a lot of money".
I sort of feel like a sucker about aspiring to be intellectually rigorous when I could just go on twitter and say capitalism causes space herpes and no one will challenge me on it. - Hugh Akston

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D.A. Ridgely
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by D.A. Ridgely »

Having never been in a band, let alone a successful band, and being at best a so-so guitarist, I've never had much interest in owning more than the one electric (an American Strat) and three acoustic guitars (one inexpensive classical, one inexpensive folk, my first guitar, and a Martin HD-28). I've known a few people who were more collectors than players, and that always struck me as a bit odd, not to mention an expensive hobby, but to each their own.

However, whenever I see concert films or rock documentaries or films that include scenes inside recording studios, I'm always jealous of the usually dozens of guitars and amps sitting around. It must be nice not only to have guitars that structurally sound distinct but to have guitars set up and tuned for every song you're going to play. Need a drop-D tuned guitar for this number? No problem. A twelve-string? It's over there. Etc., etc. Plus it really pisses me off that even second and third tier rock stars doubtlessly have manufacturers throw equipment at them for cheap product placement advertising.

It's probably sexist, but I suppose the female equivalent sort of envy is watching red carpet events where all the women are wearing (often, imo, preposterous) haute couture designer outfits no ordinary person could ever afford to buy, let alone buy to wear one time. It just brings out the Bernie Sanders in me to watch already grotesquely overpaid entertainers also getting expensive freebies thrown at them in the bargain.
Last edited by D.A. Ridgely on 26 Feb 2020, 11:51, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: On the modern electric guitar

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JD wrote:
26 Feb 2020, 11:10
A used Rickenbacker 4003 has come up locally for a really good price. Of course, "really good price" for a Rick 4003 is still "a hell of a lot of money".
Have you ever watched videos of TJH3113 on YouTube? He's an extremely skilled bassist, and he plays all sorts of different basses in his videos (playing bass lines to popular songs). He must own over 100 basses, and his comment about the Rick 4003 was that the idea of playing it was way more fun than actually playing it. Given his generally favorable comments about his basses, that one really stuck out to me.
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by JD »

Andrew wrote:
26 Feb 2020, 11:49
Have you ever watched videos of TJH3113 on YouTube? He's an extremely skilled bassist, and he plays all sorts of different basses in his videos (playing bass lines to popular songs). He must own over 100 basses, and his comment about the Rick 4003 was that the idea of playing it was way more fun than actually playing it. Given his generally favorable comments about his basses, that one really stuck out to me.
I wasn't familiar with him, but I'll definitely check him out. Do you remember which video he said that in? Just looking at the thumbnails, I can see that he's using the Rickenbacker in several of them. They certainly seem to be divisive; people tend to love them or hate them.
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by Andrew »

JD wrote:
26 Feb 2020, 12:25
Andrew wrote:
26 Feb 2020, 11:49
Have you ever watched videos of TJH3113 on YouTube? He's an extremely skilled bassist, and he plays all sorts of different basses in his videos (playing bass lines to popular songs). He must own over 100 basses, and his comment about the Rick 4003 was that the idea of playing it was way more fun than actually playing it. Given his generally favorable comments about his basses, that one really stuck out to me.
I wasn't familiar with him, but I'll definitely check him out. Do you remember which video he said that in? Just looking at the thumbnails, I can see that he's using the Rickenbacker in several of them. They certainly seem to be divisive; people tend to love them or hate them.
Good question. It's not something he says in a video--it would be in text associated with a video or maybe a response to another YT commenter. I've looked but haven't been able to find it. His older videos (9-10 years old) have him playing a 4003, but then it mostly vanishes (he still occasionally plays it and a 4000 conversion). I suspect it's in response to a YT comment where the original song was played on a Rickenbacker (so maybe something by Yes) but he uses something very different in his video.
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Re: On the modern electric guitar

Post by JD »

I found a Fender Jazz Bass Special for sale, with a hard case, at a good price yesterday, and jumped on it the same day - I think the ad was up for maybe 9 hours when I contacted the seller. I like it a lot so far; it's basically a Precision body, a Jazz neck, and P/J pickups, so it's a true hybrid, and it was made in Japan some time in the years 1984-1987. Very comfortable to play.

It's been modified a bit in the last 35-ish years; somebody put a Babicz bridge and EMG active pickups in it. I'm thinking of taking those out, selling the parts, and restoring it to original condition. I never had a problem with the original Fender bridges, and so far I am not overwhelmed with the EMGs and never saw the need for active pickups anyway. Besides, the bridge costs about $130 new and the pickup set about $180 new; even if I sold them each for 50% of original price and bought good replacement parts I'd still come out ahead.
I sort of feel like a sucker about aspiring to be intellectually rigorous when I could just go on twitter and say capitalism causes space herpes and no one will challenge me on it. - Hugh Akston

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