The Sheriff Joe Arpaio Memorial Prison Reform Thread

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Painboy
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Re: The Sheriff Joe Arpaio Memorial Prison Reform Thread

Post by Painboy » 31 Aug 2018, 16:47

Warren wrote:
31 Aug 2018, 15:29
Andrew wrote:
31 Aug 2018, 14:10
Ducey is up for reelection in Nov. Appointing Joe gets him nothing since Maricopa County (3.8 million vs 3.2 million in rest of state) has proven it's already very tired of Joe. And the rest of the state is more Blue leaning than Maricopa County (so even more anti-Joe). A younger Team Red guy who is generally popular in Arizona and can win again in 2 years gets him all the right Red voters to win again in Nov.
That sounds right.
If Joe A dies in his own bed, I'm going to be disgruntled.
Hopefully his last days will be in a nursing home staffed with immigrants and ex-cons.

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Re: The Sheriff Joe Arpaio Memorial Prison Reform Thread

Post by lunchstealer » 31 Aug 2018, 21:31

Painboy wrote:
31 Aug 2018, 16:47
Warren wrote:
31 Aug 2018, 15:29
Andrew wrote:
31 Aug 2018, 14:10
Ducey is up for reelection in Nov. Appointing Joe gets him nothing since Maricopa County (3.8 million vs 3.2 million in rest of state) has proven it's already very tired of Joe. And the rest of the state is more Blue leaning than Maricopa County (so even more anti-Joe). A younger Team Red guy who is generally popular in Arizona and can win again in 2 years gets him all the right Red voters to win again in Nov.
That sounds right.
If Joe A dies in his own bed, I'm going to be disgruntled.
Hopefully his last days will be in a nursing home staffed with immigrants and ex-cons.
Surrounded by razorwire and guard towers.
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Re: The Sheriff Joe Arpaio Memorial Prison Reform Thread

Post by Taktix® » 31 Aug 2018, 21:50

lunchstealer wrote:
Painboy wrote:
31 Aug 2018, 16:47
Warren wrote:
31 Aug 2018, 15:29
Andrew wrote:
31 Aug 2018, 14:10
Ducey is up for reelection in Nov. Appointing Joe gets him nothing since Maricopa County (3.8 million vs 3.2 million in rest of state) has proven it's already very tired of Joe. And the rest of the state is more Blue leaning than Maricopa County (so even more anti-Joe). A younger Team Red guy who is generally popular in Arizona and can win again in 2 years gets him all the right Red voters to win again in Nov.
That sounds right.
If Joe A dies in his own bed, I'm going to be disgruntled.
Hopefully his last days will be in a nursing home staffed with immigrants and ex-cons.
Surrounded by razorwire and guard towers.
In Puerto Rico...

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Re: The Sheriff Joe Arpaio Memorial Prison Reform Thread

Post by lunchstealer » 31 Aug 2018, 21:58

Taktix® wrote:
31 Aug 2018, 21:50
lunchstealer wrote:
Painboy wrote:
31 Aug 2018, 16:47
Warren wrote:
31 Aug 2018, 15:29
Andrew wrote:
31 Aug 2018, 14:10
Ducey is up for reelection in Nov. Appointing Joe gets him nothing since Maricopa County (3.8 million vs 3.2 million in rest of state) has proven it's already very tired of Joe. And the rest of the state is more Blue leaning than Maricopa County (so even more anti-Joe). A younger Team Red guy who is generally popular in Arizona and can win again in 2 years gets him all the right Red voters to win again in Nov.
That sounds right.
If Joe A dies in his own bed, I'm going to be disgruntled.
Hopefully his last days will be in a nursing home staffed with immigrants and ex-cons.
Surrounded by razorwire and guard towers.
In Puerto Rico...

Sent from my SM-J727T1 using Tapatalk
Or a leased portion of Cuba.
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Re: The Sheriff Joe Arpaio Memorial Prison Reform Thread

Post by Hugh Akston » 11 Oct 2018, 15:43

The WA supreme court has ruled the death penalty unconstitutional "because it is imposed in an arbitrary and racially biased manner."
Washington has had a moratorium on executions since 2014, but the ruling makes it the 20th state to do away with capital punishment.

The court unanimously converted the sentences of the eight people on death row to life in prison, though the justices differed mildly in their reasoning.

“The use of the death penalty is unequally applied — sometimes by where the crime took place, or the county of residence, or the available budgetary resources at any given point in time, or the race of the defendant,” Chief Justice Mary Fairhurst wrote in the lead opinion.
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Re: The Sheriff Joe Arpaio Memorial Prison Reform Thread

Post by nicole » 30 Jan 2019, 11:34

"Fucking qualia." -Hugh Akston

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Re: The Sheriff Joe Arpaio Memorial Prison Reform Thread

Post by Andrew » 30 Jan 2019, 15:21

nicole wrote:
30 Jan 2019, 11:34
I'm just depressed now

https://theappeal.org/prisons-across-th ... ce-prints/
Reminder number... I dunno, I've lost count... that I need to find a different line of work.
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Re: The Sheriff Joe Arpaio Memorial Prison Reform Thread

Post by Hugh Akston » 30 Jan 2019, 21:41

The prison-industrial complex is assholes all the way down.
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Re: The Sheriff Joe Arpaio Memorial Prison Reform Thread

Post by Hugh Akston » 03 Feb 2019, 22:06

Prisoners at the federal jail in Brookyln went a week in January/February without power or heat. (also that story is annoyingly written)
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Re: The Sheriff Joe Arpaio Memorial Prison Reform Thread

Post by Hugh Akston » 23 Feb 2019, 03:38

Does the New Yorker need a new headline writer?
There may be no worse place to live in New York City than on Rikers Island, and it is an even worse place to die—locked inside of a jail, forcibly separated from family and friends. Most people whose lives end on Rikers die of natural causes, but there is no doubt that some deaths there have been caused by the culture and conditions of Rikers itself. This tally of preventable deaths includes: Jason Echevarria, twenty-five, who swallowed a packet of soap in his cell, screamed in agony for hours, and died after guards refused to take him to the medical clinic; Carlos Mercado, forty-five, a diabetic in desperate need of insulin, who collapsed in a hallway his first day in jail; Ronald Spear, fifty-two, a kidney-dialysis patient, who died after being kicked in the head by a guard.
Eight jails now operate on Rikers, each with its own medical clinics, where incarcerated people go if they feel sick or need follow-up care, often for diseases like diabetes or asthma. But part of what makes jails such health risks for the people confined there is the insidious way that the environment undermines the ability of medical staff to perform their jobs. In 2013, officials at Rikers stopped allowing incarcerated people to walk to clinics alone; now a guard had to escort them—and, suddenly, inmates were missing their appointments nearly half the time. Venters writes, “We would give security staff list after list of the ‘must see’ patients whom we feared might die without receiving care.” This strategy worked, but only temporarily. “We might make a brief improvement,” he writes, “and then a friendly deputy warden would be promoted, transferred, or fired, and we would fall back to half or fewer of our patients being produced.” Although the situation has improved, the problem persists.
Rikers has long been notorious for its culture of brutality, and, soon after Venters started working there, he sought to determine exactly why so many inmates were being injured. The main cause of injuries was fights with other incarcerated people, but the secondary cause—accounting for about a quarter of injuries—was listed as “slip and falls,” according to official records. Venters and his team developed an injury-surveillance system, with drop-down menus where medical staff could document how and where the injuries had occurred. Soon a pattern of abuse by guards emerged—and the prevalence of slip and falls made more sense. If an incarcerated person had his nose broken by an officer’s fist, he was unlikely to tell the truth when brought to the medical clinic; fearing retaliation from guards, he might instead say that he had slipped in the shower.
To conceal the extent of the abuse toward inmates, Venters discovered, guards would sometimes hide individuals with suspicious injuries in remote jail cells. Venters describes receiving a call one day from a doctor who reported that guards had just beaten a patient in a waiting area at a clinic and that “the patient had been dragged away without receiving care and had not been seen since.” Venters went searching for him. “After failing to find him in any of the normal hiding spots in this jail, I went to another facility where ‘problematic’ patients were often sent,” he writes. “I found him in a remote part . . . and heard him sobbing before I saw him in his cell.”
Mayor Bill de Blasio has promised that Rikers Island will eventually be closed, and, in preparation, New York City has been working to reduce the number of people held in its jails. In January, de Blasio announced that the jail population “had dropped to less than eight thousand people for the first time in almost forty years.” Now the number of guards on the city’s payroll actually exceeds the number of incarcerated people. But Rikers’ culture of brutality persists, and many of its jails are falling apart. “The medical infirmary was literally the DOC bus garage before they decided to upgrade their bus fleet to another site and hand the space over to us for our sickest patients,” Venters writes. “I’ve often heard complaints about inmates who would file lawsuits about bits of the ceiling material falling down on them, but the scope of the problem became clear to me when we received a report that a rotting animal carcass had fallen into the patient area.”
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Re: The Sheriff Joe Arpaio Memorial Prison Reform Thread

Post by Kolohe » 24 Feb 2019, 09:54

I didn't realize that there was even a trial baloon out there to close Rikers.
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Re: The Sheriff Joe Arpaio Memorial Prison Reform Thread

Post by Kolohe » 24 Feb 2019, 09:57

Warren wrote:
24 Feb 2019, 09:10
nicole wrote:
24 Feb 2019, 07:53
I don’t think it’s that pedantic considering how harmful people’s sloppy thinking about pretrial detention is.
Or simply the entire judicial system from top to bottom.
(from the words I dislike thread)

I also thought there was a thing were some people with short-ish sentences chose to do that in jail rather than prison, as the former are in the urban metro area close to their families, while the latter are almost always in some remote BFE part of the state.
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Re: The Sheriff Joe Arpaio Memorial Prison Reform Thread

Post by Warren » 24 Feb 2019, 10:08

Kolohe wrote:
24 Feb 2019, 09:57
Warren wrote:
24 Feb 2019, 09:10
nicole wrote:
24 Feb 2019, 07:53
I don’t think it’s that pedantic considering how harmful people’s sloppy thinking about pretrial detention is.
Or simply the entire judicial system from top to bottom.
(from the words I dislike thread)

I also thought there was a thing were some people with short-ish sentences chose to do that in jail rather than prison, as the former are in the urban metro area close to their families, while the latter are almost always in some remote BFE part of the state.
I have never heard of a prisoner being given any choice about where he does time other than as part of a plea negotiation.
Only recently has there been any public discussion of not sending prisoners far from their families just to fuck with them because fucking with prisoners is what makes us a great nation.
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Re: The Sheriff Joe Arpaio Memorial Prison Reform Thread

Post by Hugh Akston » 24 Feb 2019, 13:05

If they do close the detention facilities on Riker's Island, the obvious replacement would be a Liberty-scale statue of Jonathan Frakes.
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Re: The Sheriff Joe Arpaio Memorial Prison Reform Thread

Post by D.A. Ridgely » 24 Feb 2019, 13:44

Trump Gated Communities

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Re: The Sheriff Joe Arpaio Memorial Prison Reform Thread

Post by Warren » 24 Feb 2019, 14:15

Hugh Akston wrote:
24 Feb 2019, 13:05
If they do close the detention facilities on Riker's Island, the obvious replacement would be a Liberty-scale statue of Jonathan Frakes.
*brim touch*
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Re: The Sheriff Joe Arpaio Memorial Prison Reform Thread

Post by Ellie » 24 Feb 2019, 14:45

Ever since I got diabetes, I'm fucking terrified at the idea of going to prison (or jail). Not like I thought it would be a party before, but being insulin-dependent while locked up would be a nightmare.
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Re: The Sheriff Joe Arpaio Memorial Prison Reform Thread

Post by Aresen » 24 Feb 2019, 19:59

Ellie wrote:
24 Feb 2019, 14:45
Ever since I got diabetes, I'm fucking terrified at the idea of going to prison (or jail). Not like I thought it would be a party before, but being insulin-dependent while locked up would be a nightmare.
But you'd have a great resale market for your needles and syringes.
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Re: The Sheriff Joe Arpaio Memorial Prison Reform Thread

Post by Hugh Akston » 13 Mar 2019, 01:24

Gavin Newsom calls a moratorium on executions in CA
California Gov. Gavin Newsom will sign a sweeping order on Wednesday putting an executive moratorium on California's troubled death penalty, thus ordering a reprieve for the 737 people on death row.

The action suspends any further executions in California as long as Newsom is governor, his office said. But only California voters can repeal the death penalty, something they rejected narrowly three years ago.
"sweeping"
The governor's office said Newsom's order will also immediately close the state's execution chamber at San Quentin Prison, but does not otherwise change any existing convictions or sentences — and will not lead to any death row inmates being released.
So sweeping
A $853,000 upgrade of the execution chamber at San Quentin was completed in 2010, but it has never been used. The last execution in California occurred January 17, 2006, when Clarence Ray Allen, 76, was put to death. No executions have been carried out since.
The sweep, I can't
Anyway, good on Newsom for temporarily suspending something that was all but suspended anyway, and at the very least adding eight more years to the sentences of people rotting on death row.
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Re: The Sheriff Joe Arpaio Memorial Prison Reform Thread

Post by Warren » 16 Mar 2019, 10:44

Hugh Akston wrote:
13 Mar 2019, 01:24
Gavin Newsom calls a moratorium on executions in CA
California Gov. Gavin Newsom will sign a sweeping order on Wednesday putting an executive moratorium on California's troubled death penalty, thus ordering a reprieve for the 737 people on death row.

The action suspends any further executions in California as long as Newsom is governor, his office said. But only California voters can repeal the death penalty, something they rejected narrowly three years ago.
"sweeping"
The governor's office said Newsom's order will also immediately close the state's execution chamber at San Quentin Prison, but does not otherwise change any existing convictions or sentences — and will not lead to any death row inmates being released.
So sweeping
A $853,000 upgrade of the execution chamber at San Quentin was completed in 2010, but it has never been used. The last execution in California occurred January 17, 2006, when Clarence Ray Allen, 76, was put to death. No executions have been carried out since.
The sweep, I can't
Anyway, good on Newsom for temporarily suspending something that was all but suspended anyway, and at the very least adding eight more years to the sentences of people rotting on death row.
Umm yeah. I'm opposed to the death penalty myself. But I don't see that as a reason to release prisoners convicted of capital crimes.
Tell me Hugh, do you even believe in crime? If so, what State actions in dealing with convicted criminals would you support?
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Re: The Sheriff Joe Arpaio Memorial Prison Reform Thread

Post by Aresen » 16 Mar 2019, 10:51

Warren wrote:
16 Mar 2019, 10:44
Hugh Akston wrote:
13 Mar 2019, 01:24
Gavin Newsom calls a moratorium on executions in CA
California Gov. Gavin Newsom will sign a sweeping order on Wednesday putting an executive moratorium on California's troubled death penalty, thus ordering a reprieve for the 737 people on death row.

The action suspends any further executions in California as long as Newsom is governor, his office said. But only California voters can repeal the death penalty, something they rejected narrowly three years ago.
"sweeping"
The governor's office said Newsom's order will also immediately close the state's execution chamber at San Quentin Prison, but does not otherwise change any existing convictions or sentences — and will not lead to any death row inmates being released.
So sweeping
A $853,000 upgrade of the execution chamber at San Quentin was completed in 2010, but it has never been used. The last execution in California occurred January 17, 2006, when Clarence Ray Allen, 76, was put to death. No executions have been carried out since.
The sweep, I can't
Anyway, good on Newsom for temporarily suspending something that was all but suspended anyway, and at the very least adding eight more years to the sentences of people rotting on death row.
Umm yeah. I'm opposed to the death penalty myself. But I don't see that as a reason to release prisoners convicted of capital crimes.
Tell me Hugh, do you even believe in crime? If so, what State actions in dealing with convicted criminals would you support?
I took that to mean sitting in the special cells for those scheduled for execution - isolated from everyone - and still not knowing if 'tough on crime' Kathleen Harris might be elected governor in 2026 and execute them anyways. I didn't see Hugh advocating releasing them.
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Re: The Sheriff Joe Arpaio Memorial Prison Reform Thread

Post by Warren » 16 Mar 2019, 11:21

oh. That's different.
nevermind
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Re: The Sheriff Joe Arpaio Memorial Prison Reform Thread

Post by Hugh Akston » 16 Mar 2019, 20:07

RSN has the right of it. That being said, it's not clear to me that the American penal system as currently constituted really accomplishes all that much in terms of deterrence, rehabilitation, or even public safety. The process of putting people in jail is rife with laziness, corruption, bias, stacked decks, perverted incentives, and tribalist mentalities. Jails themselves are basically concrete boxes that serve mostly to further brutalize incarcerated people as well as the people charged with caring for them. IOW the system works really, really well.

I would be much more amenable to a penal system that focused on education and job training for people who committed crimes out of economic desperation, and rehabilitation and therapy for people who committed crimes because of mental illness. For the vanishingly small minority of people who hurt people because they just enjoy that kind of thing, I think the state can segregate them from the general population in much more humane and productive conditions.

Also, it goes without saying that if the state can't produce a victim who was materially harmed by your 'crime', you shouldn't go to prison in the first place.
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Re: The Sheriff Joe Arpaio Memorial Prison Reform Thread

Post by Warren » 16 Mar 2019, 20:13

Hugh Akston wrote:
16 Mar 2019, 20:07
RSN has the right of it. That being said, it's not clear to me that the American penal system as currently constituted really accomplishes all that much in terms of deterrence, rehabilitation, or even public safety. The process of putting people in jail is rife with laziness, corruption, bias, stacked decks, perverted incentives, and tribalist mentalities. Jails themselves are basically concrete boxes that serve mostly to further brutalize incarcerated people as well as the people charged with caring for them. IOW the system works really, really well.
Agreed
I would be much more amenable to a penal system that focused on education and job training for people who committed crimes out of economic desperation, and rehabilitation and therapy for people who committed crimes because of mental illness.
Oh hell no. I'm not giving free stuff to people that commit crimes that we don't give to law abiding citizens.
Also, it goes without saying that if the state can't produce a victim who was materially harmed by your 'crime', you shouldn't go to prison in the first place.
Yeah no. Just no. I'll go as far as to say there needs to be an actual victim, but you don't have to provide names and addresses. Besides, that test would still allow gold-digging spouses to claim they are victims of their husband's drug use.
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Re: The Sheriff Joe Arpaio Memorial Prison Reform Thread

Post by Hugh Akston » 16 Mar 2019, 20:40

Warren wrote:
16 Mar 2019, 20:13
Hugh Akston wrote:
16 Mar 2019, 20:07
I would be much more amenable to a penal system that focused on education and job training for people who committed crimes out of economic desperation, and rehabilitation and therapy for people who committed crimes because of mental illness.
Oh hell no. I'm not giving free stuff to people that commit crimes that we don't give to law abiding citizens.
Prisons already provide food, shelter, and clothing to prisoners, all of which law-abiding citizens are expected to provide for themselves. And if the end product of incarceration is a person who makes the world better by being productive rather than an unemployable wreck who falls right back into crime, I think it's worth the cost of some welding classes or generic mood stabilizers. Especially with all the money being saved by not locking up people for victimless crimes in the first place.
Also, it goes without saying that if the state can't produce a victim who was materially harmed by your 'crime', you shouldn't go to prison in the first place.
Yeah no. Just no. I'll go as far as to say there needs to be an actual victim, but you don't have to provide names and addresses. Besides, that test would still allow gold-digging spouses to claim they are victims of their husband's drug use.
So how are you supposed to say there's an actual victim without producing an actual victim? Abstract hypothetical victims are what lead to punishing people for phantom menaces like resisting arrest, obstruction of justice, possession with intent, and treason.
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