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Re: Random covid-19 observations

Posted: 26 Mar 2020, 01:56
by Hugh Akston
A PLANET WHERE APES EVOLVED FROM MEN???

Re: Random covid-19 observations

Posted: 26 Mar 2020, 01:57
by Pham Nuwen
Monkeys dammit! Its monkeys or I walk.

Re: Random covid-19 observations

Posted: 26 Mar 2020, 09:17
by Warren
Pham Nuwen wrote:
26 Mar 2020, 01:57
Monkeys dammit! Its monkeys or I walk.
ISWYDT

Re: Random covid-19 observations

Posted: 26 Mar 2020, 11:03
by nicole
They closed the lakefront this morning instead of bringing everyone congregating in groups to the Cook County Jail so they could get the coronavirus like they obviously want to.

Re: Random covid-19 observations

Posted: 27 Mar 2020, 12:27
by dead_elvis
Certain libertarian-conservative types who love to brag about being logical and principled have turned on a dime. (underlying condition) + (police tasering/beatdown) = cause of death is taser/beatdown but (underlying condition) + (covid 19) = cause of death is underlying condition. And that stupid Skittles argument on immigration. Apparently a .00000000001% chance of being murdered by MS-13 is worth drastic federal action but a 2-15(?)% chance (depending on local hospital capacity) from a preventable virus outbreak doesn't.

Re: Random covid-19 observations

Posted: 27 Mar 2020, 12:55
by nicole
I have literally never felt less solidarity with other people

Re: Random covid-19 observations

Posted: 27 Mar 2020, 13:30
by Jennifer
Today I learned that I technically committed a misdemeanor crime, the last time I went grocery shopping AND the last time (just a couple days ago) I went on a walking trail: it is illegal in Georgia to go out wearing a mask covering a substantial portion of your face.

Re: Random covid-19 observations

Posted: 27 Mar 2020, 17:56
by Jennifer
Not an observation so much as actual no-shit advice for certain people (cut and pasted from my latest Facebook and blog post):

Serious advice for anyone living in places where hurricanes and similar natural disasters are a possible threat during certain parts of the year: start washing and saving the plastic bottles (caps included) containing soda, juice, iced tea, Kool-aid and similar non-dairy beverages, even if you're usually wont to throw these bottles out with the garbage or recycling. I say this based on concern that, if supply chains and business overall remains wonky when hurricane season starts in June, buying the recommended 14-day supply of bottled water will be a HELL of a lot harder than it already is under those conditions.

Do not, however, save and re-use plastic milk jugs,plastic or any other containers that once held dairy drinks (which includes a lot of coffee beverages); no matter how many times you wash and sterilize it, you can never be entirely certain you got rid of ALL traces of milk proteins, which make microbes grow like crazy.

I already have a large collection of one-liter and one-gallon bottles (which originally held Jeff's preferred brands of club soda and unsweetened iced tea). If I had a big house and basement with lots of storage capacity, I'd just buy pallets of bottled water and be done with it; however, I live in an apartment which simply does not have the storage space (or strong-enough shelving) to hold 48 gallons of water at approximately one cubic foot and eight 1/3 pounds per gallon. So instead, I keep only a 4-day supply of pre-bottled water on hand, plus enough clean plastic bottles to hold another 11 or 12 day's worth. Here's a list of tricks I've learned over the years:

1. If you don't have enough shelf or floor storage space to easily hold all those bulky (though lightweight) bottles, you can put them in large unused garbage or lawn bags and hang them from the ceiling of a storage closet or some other out-of-the-way space. Weight is not an issue with all those empty plastic bottles; only actual volume of space is an issue.

2. Easiest way to wash and sterilize bottles (assuming clear transparent plastic): rinse out each bottle, then give it a squirt of liquid dish soap, add hot tap water full blast until the top of the soap suds start coming out the mouth of the bottle. Then cap the bottle and give it a good shake several times, enough for the soapsuds to get a chance to go against all interior surfaces.

3. The difficult/annoying part of washing bottles is actually the rinsing, and making sure not a TRACE of soap remains in any of them. The least-annoying method, I've discovered, is: dump all the hot soapy water out, then fill it with cold tap water slowly enough that the traces of remaining soap are NOT agitated into suds. Do this until the water overflows the bottle, then dump everything out. Depending on the shape of the bottle, you might need to repeat this process anywhere from two to four times to make sure every last bit of soap is gone.

4. Of course, drying out the inside of the bottles is the part that takes the longest, because YOU can't actually dry them; you can only wait for the water to evaporate out of those narrow bottlenecks. Weather permitting, I've found the best way to do this is to arrange the bottles on a drying rack by a window, with direct sunlight shining in/on the bottles. Otherwise, I set up the drying rack in an out-of-the-way part of the house.

5. If you are going to partly fill bottles of water to freeze, DO NOT use bottles or jugs with irregular shapes; stick with symmetrical bottles, ideally cylinders rather than squared-off bottles or anything with angles. I learned this the hard way when I prepared for a hurricane last year (which, luckily, did NOT hit me after all): took a hollow-handled jug which originally held a gallon of iced tea; filled it about 80 percent with water (leaving room for the ice to expand, of course); and due to the irregular shape of the bottle, the ice ended up expanding in ways that completely split the bottle. Since I did not lose power, I only had to discard a giant irregularly-shaped ice cube plus a bunch of plastic shards; had that ice melted it would've been a LOT messier.

6. I reserve the right to add to this list later if I remember anything else.

Re: Random covid-19 observations

Posted: 28 Mar 2020, 14:29
by Jennifer
Here's something which (fortunately) is not affecting me or my household, but it WOULD have if, instead of March 2020 being the month Everything Changed for Americans, this pandemic had struck anytime between, say, July 2016 to end-of-last-summer (and I am certain it is currently affecting who-knows-how-many American families right this minute): right now in many states or cities/counties throughout the country, "non-essential" businesses have been ordered to close. This includes clothing-only retailers, and thrift store/flea market/secondhand-type shops.

For me personally this second -- a full-grown adult who will never, ever be any taller than I am now, AND already has a fairly extensive wardrobe of garments appropriate for my local climate -- this isn't really a problem; the only garment I truly "need" but do not have right now is rain boots, and even then, I can (with some extra effort) avoid having to walk around in sopping wet socks and shoes by taking extra pairs of both with me, plus an old towel, so whenever I had to (for example) literally wade through ankle-deep water to get from my car to a place of business or vice-versa, as soon as I get back to dry land I change my socks and shoes. (There's a couple other garments, such as a rayon sunhat, which would be "nice to have," but strictly speaking I do not "need" them; I can make do with the hot-material sunhats I have already.)

However, suppose I could not buy thrift store clothes, or even regular retail items, when I first moved to Georgia, in the middle of a very hot summer, and immediately learned my northern-grade "summer clothes" absolutely DID NOT cut it down here -- wearing any of my circa-June 2016 clothes in Atlanta summer sunshine put me at serious risk of sunburn, heatstroke, severe dehydration/kidney stones or all three at once. So I immediately started visiting thrift stores and, after a long while, DID finally manage to amass a collection of linen or rayon extreme-heat clothes good enough that I can at least go outside on the worst summer days without my garments exacerbating various heat-and-humidity problems. But if I had need of such clothing right now -- or even a few weeks from now, the way things are going -- what the hell would I do? Theoretically I could buy a couple garments online, but of course even the cheapest e-tailers would charge far more money, for less-nice clothes, than what I was able to find secondhand. I literally cannot afford to get a decent deep-summer wardrobe if I have to pay retail prices for each item, especially not linen which is noticeably more expensive than most textiles these days. Plus, not being able to try something on before buying it is GUARANTEED to generate a buttload of "false positives" or bad purchases from me.

Or: suppose I have children who are still growing, and sometime in the past month my oldest kid's clothes switched from "a little too big so you can grow into them" to "a little too small, so that things are getting tight and the sleeves or legs are too short." And, since I already specified that this is my OLDEST kid, they can't make do with a larger sibling's hand-me-downs. Or suppose I were to get pregnant and NOT abort or miscarry -- in that case, I'll start outgrowing ALL of my current clothes sometime in the next month or so.

Tl;dr: most American individuals and households can currently go some time before anybody truly "needs" to buy new clothes or shoes -- but there are many people who cannot, and what the hell are THEY going to do?

Re: Random covid-19 observations

Posted: 28 Mar 2020, 15:38
by Twba
Jennifer wrote:
28 Mar 2020, 14:29
Tl;dr: most American individuals and households can currently go some time before anybody truly "needs" to buy new clothes or shoes -- but there are many people who cannot, and what the hell are THEY going to do?
The universal shelter in place rules won't last much longer. Americans simply don't have the patience for this shit.

Re: Random covid-19 observations

Posted: 28 Mar 2020, 16:20
by Jennifer
Twba wrote:
28 Mar 2020, 15:38
Jennifer wrote:
28 Mar 2020, 14:29
Tl;dr: most American individuals and households can currently go some time before anybody truly "needs" to buy new clothes or shoes -- but there are many people who cannot, and what the hell are THEY going to do?
The universal shelter in place rules won't last much longer. Americans simply don't have the patience for this shit.
I dunno; it depends on how bad covid-19 gets -- and more precisely, how many Americans are personally affected by it somehow. (I mean personally affected by the disease itself, not by the quarantine or other responses to it.) Fortunately, I suspect/hope MOST Americans today are more or less where I am: I personally am not sick, nobody in my household is sick, and while I do have some friends and acquaintances (including people on this very forum) who unfortunately have themselves or a spouse come down with an illness strongly suspected to be covid-19, so far everyone connected to me in any way is "only" suffering the mild forms of the disease -- the sort of thing where, if not for the news coverage, they'd think they just had an unusually gnarly cold or mild flu.

But if, Zod forbid, things change enough that most Americans instead say "Either I, or someone I care about, got extremely sick or even died of it" ... the quarantine will last at LEAST until that all ends. And not only will most Americans support this, they'll likely demand the quarantines be made stricter.

Re: Random covid-19 observations

Posted: 28 Mar 2020, 22:21
by Twba
Jennifer wrote:
28 Mar 2020, 16:20
Twba wrote:
28 Mar 2020, 15:38
Jennifer wrote:
28 Mar 2020, 14:29
Tl;dr: most American individuals and households can currently go some time before anybody truly "needs" to buy new clothes or shoes -- but there are many people who cannot, and what the hell are THEY going to do?
The universal shelter in place rules won't last much longer. Americans simply don't have the patience for this shit.
I dunno; it depends on how bad covid-19 gets -- and more precisely, how many Americans are personally affected by it somehow. (I mean personally affected by the disease itself, not by the quarantine or other responses to it.) Fortunately, I suspect/hope MOST Americans today are more or less where I am: I personally am not sick, nobody in my household is sick, and while I do have some friends and acquaintances (including people on this very forum) who unfortunately have themselves or a spouse come down with an illness strongly suspected to be covid-19, so far everyone connected to me in any way is "only" suffering the mild forms of the disease -- the sort of thing where, if not for the news coverage, they'd think they just had an unusually gnarly cold or mild flu.

But if, Zod forbid, things change enough that most Americans instead say "Either I, or someone I care about, got extremely sick or even died of it" ... the quarantine will last at LEAST until that all ends. And not only will most Americans support this, they'll likely demand the quarantines be made stricter.
Yeah, the kids are already calling it BoomerRemover-19. Even in Italy where the health care system is running around with its hair on fire when the telly cameras show up, 99 percent of deaths are 50 and older. There have been 0 COVID deaths under 30 in Italy as of yesterday. It is one thing to strongly recommend that Americans 70 and older take serious precautions, it is another entirely to threaten to arrest young Americans for getting on with life.

Re: Random covid-19 observations

Posted: 29 Mar 2020, 03:00
by Jennifer
Illinois department of health reports death of an infant who tested positive for covid-19.

https://www.dph.illinois.gov/news/publi ... us-disease

That said: of the 13 other deaths mentioned that day in the link, all were indeed aged 50 or older.

Re: Random covid-19 observations

Posted: 29 Mar 2020, 11:12
by D.A. Ridgely
Looking at the JHU map this morning I had to wonder how in the hell someone in Greenland caught the virus. I mean, Greenland? Isn't it bad enough being in Greenland in the first place? Poor guy.

Re: Random covid-19 observations

Posted: 29 Mar 2020, 13:10
by Aresen
For the first time in my life, I stood in line to enter a grocery store this morning.

I feel very soviet.

Re: Random covid-19 observations

Posted: 29 Mar 2020, 13:33
by Jennifer
Aresen wrote:
29 Mar 2020, 13:10
For the first time in my life, I stood in line to enter a grocery store this morning.

I feel very soviet.
Jeff and I had our first stand-in-line yesterday, to get into Home Depot, and I felt very similar.

Also, it felt rather off-putting and almost sci-fi dystopian to hear the messages on the store sound system: instead of the usual "Welcome shoppers, apply for a store credit card, here's today's sales" type of fare, it was all assurances that our staff is keeping the store clean and sanitized, and remember to stand at least six feet away from other shoppers.

ETA: Also, some people are far better than others, at respecting the "stay six feet away from others" rule. I can only hope certain clueless dipshits who passed within less than a foot of me (and every other person in line, or in the store) were either not infected, or did not infect me. At least I didn't hear coughs or sneezes.

Re: Random covid-19 observations

Posted: 29 Mar 2020, 14:16
by Jennifer
Ugh.

Not trying to one-up anybody else here regarding the "feeling very soviet" thing, but -- my spouse and his colleagues at a TV network just got issued special letters verifying their essential-worker status, to show police if they get pulled over after curfew.

I understand the need for such matters, and I've long held "quarantine for airborne-contagious diseases" as one exception to certain liberty/libertarian individual-rights ideals, but even so this all makes me distinctly uneasy.

Re: Random covid-19 observations

Posted: 29 Mar 2020, 14:17
by Jennifer
An employee who works on the same campus as my spouse tested positive, but it's nobody with whom they interact with.

Re: Random covid-19 observations

Posted: 29 Mar 2020, 14:19
by thoreau
The fact that an extraordinary measure is necessary does not and should not make it unobjectionable. Extraordinary measures SHOULD feel uncomfortable. They SHOULD make you feel uneasy. We SHOULD caveat our support for them. It's the only way to make sure they don't remain in place afterwards.

If people had objected more after 9/11, we wouldn't have the PATRIOT Act in perpetuity.

Re: Random covid-19 observations

Posted: 29 Mar 2020, 14:27
by Jennifer
Thing is, even with the closed-business curfew in place, there's reasons why someone would be out after 9 pm or whenever the local curfew is: maybe you're taking your family out of the city to stay in your isolated rural vacation cabin (or singlewide trailer) in the mountains a couple hours' north of your city. That is NOT an action likely to spread the virus anymore than it has already.

On the other hand, supposing you or someone in your family IS infected but doesn't know it yet -- leaving your dense city home to stay in your isolated rural house (assuming it is already stocked and supplied) might save your neighbors in the city from your infection -- but what about the cop who pulled you over to demand why you're out past curfew? Unless he's wearing viral-grade protection gear, he'll likely catch it when he pulls your car over, then he'll give it to everybody ELSE he pulls over.

Re: Random covid-19 observations

Posted: 29 Mar 2020, 22:44
by Jennifer
Jennifer wrote:
29 Mar 2020, 14:27
what about the cop who pulled you over to demand why you're out past curfew? Unless he's wearing viral-grade protection gear, he'll likely catch it when he pulls your car over, then he'll give it to everybody ELSE he pulls over.
In case anybody is curious: Jeff just got home and showed me his "curfew-breaking" paraphernalia: there's a letter, but also a very large (eight or ten inches square) placard he puts in his window when driving, with his company name/logo and press status, so presumably the cops can see it and not bother pulling him over. Jeff also showed me the letter, which is small print and covers most of a page; lots of kissing cop ass in it, including something along the lines of "These first informers* are risking their health, just as you and your colleagues are during this difficult time, to [blah blah]." And 24-hour phone numbers of various lawyers the company keeps on staff, should any cops feel the need to call and verify.

*Apparently that's an official title: people like EMTs and firefighters are exempt from curfew because they're "first responders"; working media people are exempt because they're 'first informers."

Re: Random covid-19 observations

Posted: 30 Mar 2020, 06:45
by Mo
Twba wrote:
28 Mar 2020, 22:21
Jennifer wrote:
28 Mar 2020, 16:20
Twba wrote:
28 Mar 2020, 15:38
Jennifer wrote:
28 Mar 2020, 14:29
Tl;dr: most American individuals and households can currently go some time before anybody truly "needs" to buy new clothes or shoes -- but there are many people who cannot, and what the hell are THEY going to do?
The universal shelter in place rules won't last much longer. Americans simply don't have the patience for this shit.
I dunno; it depends on how bad covid-19 gets -- and more precisely, how many Americans are personally affected by it somehow. (I mean personally affected by the disease itself, not by the quarantine or other responses to it.) Fortunately, I suspect/hope MOST Americans today are more or less where I am: I personally am not sick, nobody in my household is sick, and while I do have some friends and acquaintances (including people on this very forum) who unfortunately have themselves or a spouse come down with an illness strongly suspected to be covid-19, so far everyone connected to me in any way is "only" suffering the mild forms of the disease -- the sort of thing where, if not for the news coverage, they'd think they just had an unusually gnarly cold or mild flu.

But if, Zod forbid, things change enough that most Americans instead say "Either I, or someone I care about, got extremely sick or even died of it" ... the quarantine will last at LEAST until that all ends. And not only will most Americans support this, they'll likely demand the quarantines be made stricter.
Yeah, the kids are already calling it BoomerRemover-19. Even in Italy where the health care system is running around with its hair on fire when the telly cameras show up, 99 percent of deaths are 50 and older. There have been 0 COVID deaths under 30 in Italy as of yesterday. It is one thing to strongly recommend that Americans 70 and older take serious precautions, it is another entirely to threaten to arrest young Americans for getting on with life.
Being put on a respirator is no walk in the park. After a week or two in ICU you get pretty significant muscle loss that requires physical therapy to get back to normal. Also, I believe there has been an Italian death of someone under 30.

Re: Random covid-19 observations

Posted: 30 Mar 2020, 09:26
by Warren
:roll: whatever dude.

I've always heard, and always believed, and has been my experience, that people come together in a crisis.
But this thing. Man. Just an excuse for people to keep shouting WHAT I BELIEVE all day every day.

Re: Random covid-19 observations

Posted: 30 Mar 2020, 09:33
by JasonL
People come together so long as their interests are not orthogonal, and at a certain point of this thing, that is going to be the case.

Re: Random covid-19 observations

Posted: 30 Mar 2020, 09:37
by Warren
JasonL wrote:
30 Mar 2020, 09:33
People come together so long as their interests are not orthogonal, and at a certain point of this thing, that is going to be the case.
You mean after all the old and poor people die? :)