Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

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Andrew
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

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JD wrote: 13 Nov 2019, 10:40 They seem to have been hit particularly badly by the post-2000 economic slump and the crash of 2008, and I wonder if some of their continuing weakness has to do with that one-two punch coming early in their careers, leaving them a step behind out of the starting gate, to mix metaphors. The graph is not terribly precise, but it looks like something similar might have happened in the 1970s, where younger groups were more affected than older ones.
That was my understanding--starting in a crap economy is bad for lifetime earnings, whether it was a 70s, 80s, or later recession. Obviously not insurmountable, but it's a real issue. And anyone who takes out massive student loans is compounding (npi) the problem.
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nicole
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

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Has anyone ever read anything that compares data like this with when more and more states started raising age requirements for drivers licenses?

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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

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Why don't you put that question out on Twitter?
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

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Hugh Akston wrote: 06 Dec 2019, 11:58 Why don't you put that question out on Twitter?
I'm likely not followed by anyone who would be able to answer it and the thread I posted is too stale to ask within it. Though I did consider doing both.
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

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Well, I did it anyway. We'll see.
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

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nicole wrote: 06 Dec 2019, 11:53 Has anyone ever read anything that compares data like this with when more and more states started raising age requirements for drivers licenses?

My main concern is the decline in the number who say they've worked for pay.
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

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States have been raising the legal driving age? huh
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

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Warren wrote: 06 Dec 2019, 15:01 States have been raising the legal driving age? huh
Yeah, raising the age for getting any license but also making licenses for teens restricted. Usually involving a curfew and rules against having other teens as passengers.
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

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From what I've read, in at least some states, getting that first-ever license is considerably more expensive than when I first got mine, too.
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

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Millennials are leaving religion and not coming back
Millennials have earned a reputation for reshaping industries and institutions — shaking up the workplace, transforming dating culture, and rethinking parenthood. They’ve also had a dramatic impact on American religious life. Four in ten millennials now say they are religiously unaffiliated, according to the Pew Research Center. In fact, millennials (those between the ages of 23 and 38) are now almost as likely to say they have no religion as they are to identify as Christian. 1

For a long time, though, it wasn’t clear whether this youthful defection from religion would be temporary or permanent. It seemed possible that as millennials grew older, at least some would return to a more traditional religious life. But there’s mounting evidence that today’s younger generations may be leaving religion for good.
But one finding in the survey signals that even millennials who grew up religious may be increasingly unlikely to return to religion. In the 1970s, most nonreligious Americans had a religious spouse and often, that partner would draw them back into regular religious practice. But now, a growing number of unaffiliated Americans are settling down with someone who isn’t religious — a process that may have been accelerated by the sheer number of secular romantic partners available, and the rise of online dating. Today, 74 percent of unaffiliated millennials have a nonreligious partner or spouse, while only 26 percent have a partner who is religious.
Why does it matter if millennials’ rupture with religion turns out to be permanent? For one thing, religious involvement is associated with a wide variety of positive social outcomes like increased interpersonal trust and civic engagement that are hard to reproduce in other ways. And this trend has obvious political implications. As we wrote a few months ago, whether people are religious is increasingly tied to — and even driven by — their political identities. For years, the Christian conservative movement has warned about a tide of rising secularism, but research has suggested that the strong association between religion and the Republican Party may actually be fueling this divide. And if even more Democrats lose their faith, that will only exacerbate the acrimonious rift between secular liberals and religious conservatives.
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

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Hugh Akston wrote: 16 Dec 2019, 12:41 For one thing, religious involvement is associated with a wide variety of positive social outcomes like increased interpersonal trust and civic engagement that are hard to reproduce in other ways.
:roll: Oh please.
Hugh Akston wrote: 16 Dec 2019, 12:41 For years, the Christian conservative movement has warned about a tide of rising secularism, but research has suggested that the strong association between religion and the Republican Party may actually be fueling this divide.
And good riddance.
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

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Warren wrote: 16 Dec 2019, 14:13
Hugh Akston wrote: 16 Dec 2019, 12:41 For one thing, religious involvement is associated with a wide variety of positive social outcomes like increased interpersonal trust and civic engagement that are hard to reproduce in other ways.
:roll: Oh please.
Hugh Akston wrote: 16 Dec 2019, 12:41 For years, the Christian conservative movement has warned about a tide of rising secularism, but research has suggested that the strong association between religion and the Republican Party may actually be fueling this divide.
And good riddance.
Well, the first is true, however disappointing that observation may be to some. There are few other institutional opportunities for family participation in society, and while I desperately wish they would also practice what they preach, it's nonetheless also true that concepts such as charity, brotherhood, fidelity, etc. are more often than not espoused in religious institutions and not especially effectively taught elsewhere.

Moreover, as to the second, I'm tired of lazy reporting conflating Christianity as a whole or even Christianity in the U.S. with Evangelicalism. Big Box Evangelicalism represents somewhere around 30% of self-identified Christians in the U.S., and while they are undoubtedly in an unholy alliance with all that is bad about the Republican Party, they hardly speak for the rest of Christendom. True, Roman Catholics and Evangelicals share an anti-abortion stance, but as far as I know the Vatican hasn't murdered or imprisoned any scientists for quite a while now, nor have they contributed to the Creation Museum or rabidly urged their flocks to go out and vote for Trump.

I think it's a good thing that Millennials are increasingly rejecting the shopworn notion that one must have some religious beliefs in order to be ethical or a member in good standing in society, but we shouldn't toss out the Baby Jesus with the bilge-water, either.
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

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When I read stuff like this and I look at the state of mega church participation in the south I become more worried about fracture lines across which there is very little common experience.
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

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JasonL wrote: 16 Dec 2019, 15:11 When I read stuff like this and I look at the state of mega church participation in the south I become more worried about fracture lines across which there is very little common experience.
Painboy mentioned in the other thread the cyclical nature of xenophobia in America, and religiosity follows similar trends. It's possible that the prosperity gospel megachurches might be the one that finally rends the country in twain, but I'm certain people thought the same about the last four crests.
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

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Why millennials are the “death positive” generation Narrator: They aren't
the National Funeral Directors Association found that 15.8 percent of Americans age 18 to 39 think people should pre-plan their funerals before they’re 40 — something only 7.9 percent of people over age 60 believed.
If conventional burial all but ensured your last act on Earth was a destructive one, these green efforts often capitalize on the belief that your body can become “nutritive,” Olson, the Virginia Tech ethicist, says. People see “having a tree made out of them or turning them into compost [as a way of] giving them new life,” he says. But there’s another, darker way to read this: We want to be productive even when we’re dead. We’re taking our #riseandgrind capitalistic mentality to the grave.
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

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Millenials are KILLING IT at death!
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

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thoreau wrote: 24 Jan 2020, 12:49 Millenials are KILLING IT at death!
Millennials are killing the staying-alive industry?
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

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lunchstealer wrote: 24 Jan 2020, 15:43
thoreau wrote: 24 Jan 2020, 12:49 Millenials are KILLING IT at death!
Millennials are killing the staying-alive industry?
Ah Ah Ah
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

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This is a time when I am perfectly happy with "OK, Boomer."
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

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Aresen wrote: 24 Jan 2020, 17:02 This is a time when I am perfectly happy with "OK, Boomer."
As with my own, 'Christ you Millennials are a bunch of insufferable poppinjays,' sentiment, the numerous exceptions are kind of assumed so the usage is okay in my book.
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

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Hugh Akston wrote: 24 Jan 2020, 12:22
"...But there’s another, darker way to read this: We want to be productive even when we’re dead. We’re taking our #riseandgrind capitalistic mentality to the grave.
Never change, Vox
So, the "darker" side of capitalism is that it spurs you to be productive and benefit others?

That's not how I usually see it put.
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nicole
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🤔

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Eric the .5b
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

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You gotta understand—Mayor Pete is a square, Daddy-o! Ain't nobody gonna vote for a suit and tie...

Mind, even against Donald Trump, I suspect the Millennials won't break 50% turnout.
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

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PS - all you sucky people pls pay for everything so I can quit my job and follow My Chemical Romance on their reunion tour while bitching about late stage capitalism.
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JasonL
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Re: Fragments of an avotoast anthropology

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This article in the comments.

https://www.theawl.com/2012/02/some-adv ... ng-people/

Punchline - you should destroy the soulless careerists who use us all.
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