Dream of Konmarification - Getting rid of stuff thread

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Andrew
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Re: Dream of Konmarification - Getting rid of stuff thread

Post by Andrew »

D.A. Ridgely wrote:Have you considered Abe Books?
I had not, but it appears that setting up a seller account is far more expensive than it would be worth to sell a few books. And my textbooks are too old for their buyback program.

Interestingly, though, I'm glad I looked, because now I'll keep the early edition of Thus Spake Zarathustra that I have. Well, keep it until I can identify the exact printing (no copyright date, printing date, edition number... great) and then sell it.
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Re: Dream of Konmarification - Getting rid of stuff thread

Post by Sandy »

I have resorted to recycling books that fetch low prices on Amazon. It's worth more to be rid of them than to see if I can arbitrage Amazon's shipping allocation.
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Re: Dream of Konmarification - Getting rid of stuff thread

Post by Hugh Akston »

Financial health through minimalism
Georgina Caro downsized the family home, gave away three-quarters of their possessions and now thinks much more carefully about every purchase. As a result, Caro and her partner, Phil Warne, who live in Cornwall with their two young children, no longer have any short-term debts and have halved their mortgage.
“Shopping used to be a leisure activity but now we only shop if we need something specific. When you have spent a lot of time and effort decluttering your home, the last thing you want to do is fill it with more stuff. We have a ‘one thing in, one out policy’,” she says. “When I am shopping I ask myself: ‘Do I need it?’ And if so: ‘Why do I need it?’ If there is something we need or a holiday, for example, then we save up.”
“In the past I might have had five or six different sweaters in my wardrobe, for example. Some would still have the tags on because I got them home and didn’t ever wear them. Now I have a capsule wardrobe where I can see everything and I love every item.”
She says her biggest savings have been made through spending less on clothes and household goods. “I plan meals for the week so I don’t buy food unnecessarily. I’ve decluttered the kitchen cupboards so I can easily see what ingredients are there. I never buy duplicates by mistake now or throw away food. I have halved the cost of our weekly food shop through this process – it’s a huge saving.”

Colins also says she has got rid of all her store and credit cards so there is no temptation to spend unwisely or on a whim, something she might have regretted in the past.
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Re: Dream of Konmarification - Getting rid of stuff thread

Post by Jennifer »

"In the past I might have had five or six different sweaters in my wardrobe, for example"

[Wistful sigh] [sad nostalgia] Once upon a time, I too lived in a climate moderate enough that, if I wanted to, I could've used "Five or six different this-season tops" as an example of wretched excess. Those were the days when it wasn't unusual for me to be able to wear a non-underwear garment multiple times before it needed washing. Then I moved to Atlanta, where for seven months out of every twelve you can't wear ANYTHING more than one day without laundering the perspiration out of it (and for a couple of those months, having to change clothes TWICE a day isn't that unusual).
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nicole
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Re: Dream of Konmarification - Getting rid of stuff thread

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The five-or-six-sweater people are freaks. You know how long my sweaters are going to last if I have to wear each one more than once a week for six months of the year? Also, sometimes you have to wear more than one at a time. I hate fast fashion but that doesn't mean it's only reasonable to have five sweaters.
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Jennifer
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Re: Dream of Konmarification - Getting rid of stuff thread

Post by Jennifer »

nicole wrote:
01 Oct 2019, 15:29
The five-or-six-sweater people are freaks. You know how long my sweaters are going to last if I have to wear each one more than once a week for six months of the year? Also, sometimes you have to wear more than one at a time. I hate fast fashion but that doesn't mean it's only reasonable to have five sweaters.
This reminds me of something I've read before -- IIRC in the context of "this new tiny-home fad and related things" -- how some of the modern minimalist movement has replaced "conspicuous consumption" with "conspicuous non-consumption," if you get what I mean. Because, as you pointed out here, if you live in a climate where you need to wear sweaters -- and assuming you intend to meet the minimum acceptable hygiene and clothing-cleanliness standards of our society -- then if you make a point of only having the one sweater, or two {remember: this woman is NOT saying it's "reasonable to have only five sweaters"; she's holding "five or six sweaters" up as an example of wretched excess} then yeah, if you only own a handful of sweaters which are being washed or worn ALL THE FREAKING TIME, I'd wager that over the course of a few years, you'll actually "consume" (read: wear out) far more sweaters than the more "materialistic" person who owns a larger number of sweaters at any given time.

[Addendum: just checked the Gryll-archives and I mentioned it here already]
Jennifer wrote:
01 Nov 2018, 17:15
Ellie wrote:
01 Nov 2018, 16:15
why do tiny house people hate having reasonable access to things?
Speculation -- which is simultaneously off the top of my head and outta my ass (don't spend too much time trying to picture how that works) -- I wonder if, at least in some instances, it's the same personality trait which, in earlier eras, might've made uber-religious types subscribe to the ideas of "mortification?" It was fairly common in medieval Europe: like, instead of proving you're a good Christian via actually helping people who need it -- feed the hungry, care for the sick, provide homes to orphans -- you just make your own self miserable: wear an itchy hair shirt, sprinkle wood ash on your food to ensure you don't derive the tiniest bit of enjoyment from eating it, make a point of kneeling on hard ground to and beyond the point of actual pain, and so forth.

Semi-related: though I cannot find it now, some years ago I recall reading an article -- not about the tiny-house movement per se, but the "hyper-minimalism" movement in general -- the gist of it was, some wealthy people engage in "conspicuous consumption," whereas these folks are engaging in "conspicuous non-consumption" (or rather, conspicuous non-ownership). One specific example I recall in support of this thesis: many of the conspicuously "less is more" types will say things like "Don't save things because you might need them later; discard them, and then if you need it, BUY it." But of course, doing this requires you have the money to buy things when you need them. In today's environment, having "more stuff" is (to an extent) actually cheaper and more affordable than having "less stuff." And, while I don't watch any of the tiny-house shows you do, I get the definite impression that acquiring such a tiny house is actually more costly than a reasonably sized house, over and above such additional expenses as "Feeding yourself and your family is a hell of a lot more expensive, if you haven't room to keep more than a day or two worth of food on hand." Even for someone with an actual "need" for mobility -- such as "I make my living traveling the country to various art fairs and stuff" -- I'm sure that if all you actually want is "something mobile I can live in while traveling, and also have room to store the stuff I sell plus whatever personal living items I need while on the road," there are cheaper AND more convenient options than what the people on those shows are going for.
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Jennifer
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Re: Dream of Konmarification - Getting rid of stuff thread

Post by Jennifer »

Though, having said that: according to Hugh's article, it does at least sound like this woman has adopted many forms of "frugal minimalism" as opposed to "wasteful minimalism," since she says she is indeed paying down her debts and building savings at an increased rate nowadays.
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dhex
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Re: Dream of Konmarification - Getting rid of stuff thread

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nicole wrote:
01 Oct 2019, 15:29
The five-or-six-sweater people are freaks. You know how long my sweaters are going to last if I have to wear each one more than once a week for six months of the year? Also, sometimes you have to wear more than one at a time. I hate fast fashion but that doesn't mean it's only reasonable to have five sweaters.
Depends on whether we're talking about sweaters like you're herding sheep in the highlands for those cardigan things that you can see through. My wife has many of the latter and I dream of throwing out all but five or six.
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D.A. Ridgely
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Re: Dream of Konmarification - Getting rid of stuff thread

Post by D.A. Ridgely »

dhex wrote:
01 Oct 2019, 19:14
nicole wrote:
01 Oct 2019, 15:29
The five-or-six-sweater people are freaks. You know how long my sweaters are going to last if I have to wear each one more than once a week for six months of the year? Also, sometimes you have to wear more than one at a time. I hate fast fashion but that doesn't mean it's only reasonable to have five sweaters.
Depends on whether we're talking about sweaters like you're herding sheep in the highlands for those cardigan things that you can see through. My wife has many of the latter and I dream of throwing out all but five or six.
I have maybe a dozen sweaters which, admittedly, haven't seen that much use since we moved to Dallas, but a good wool sweater will last for decades. In fact, I just had a hand-knitted Aran Islands fisherman's sweater repaired. It will last for generations and never go out of style. Same with your basic crew neck and V-neck pullovers. Okay, maybe it's different for women, but sweaters are forever until they are so pilled they really do need to be discarded.

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Re: Dream of Konmarification - Getting rid of stuff thread

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Alpaca FTW
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D.A. Ridgely
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Re: Dream of Konmarification - Getting rid of stuff thread

Post by D.A. Ridgely »

Warren wrote:
01 Oct 2019, 20:14
Alpaca FTW
I assume you were being whimsical, but the problem with sweaters made from anything other than high quality sheep's or lamb's wool or, for merely cool weather, cotton, is that they don't wear well. If you're (not you, Warren, but the generic "you") filthy rich and like cashmere sweaters, have at it. You're probably the sort of person who buys a new wardrobe every season, anyway.

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Re: Dream of Konmarification - Getting rid of stuff thread

Post by Warren »

Well we don't get a lot of use out of sweaters her in MO (it's Oct. and still in the 90's) But the alpaca throw on the sofa is over five years old.
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Re: Dream of Konmarification - Getting rid of stuff thread

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I'm throwing out so much stuff that I could sell on Facebook Marketplace (and that I have a pretty good idea would sell and for how much -- because I bought it there a few months ago). Mostly baby stuff that Li'l Ringo immediately outgrew. I have to keep reminding myself how unlikely it is I would ever actually get around to photographing it, making a listing, and coordinating a meetup -- and that there is also value in just having the damn thing out of my house and not having to think about it anymore.
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nicole
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Re: Dream of Konmarification - Getting rid of stuff thread

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Ellie wrote:
19 Oct 2019, 08:22
I'm throwing out so much stuff that I could sell on Facebook Marketplace (and that I have a pretty good idea would sell and for how much -- because I bought it there a few months ago). Mostly baby stuff that Li'l Ringo immediately outgrew. I have to keep reminding myself how unlikely it is I would ever actually get around to photographing it, making a listing, and coordinating a meetup -- and that there is also value in just having the damn thing out of my house and not having to think about it anymore.
I have extremely been here.

When we moved last year I brought soooooo much clothes and shoes to the various bins for donations in like grocery store parking lots. Everyone says those aren’t that great because the stuff mostly ends up getting recycled into rags or whatever or even just trashed. But I have the benefit of living in an area where when I dropped these bags and bags of stuff off, there were people ready to look through them right then for their families. I think only about 10% of our stuff even made it into the bins.
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Re: Dream of Konmarification - Getting rid of stuff thread

Post by Hugh Akston »

You can always drop them off at your local Goodwill/Salvation Army drop point. There are also resale shops that specialize in babby stuff. Not sure whether and how much they pay.
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Re: Dream of Konmarification - Getting rid of stuff thread

Post by D.A. Ridgely »

Hugh Akston wrote:
19 Oct 2019, 12:34
You can always drop them off at your local Goodwill/Salvation Army drop point. There are also resale shops that specialize in babby stuff. Not sure whether and how much they pay.
They'll pay zero. And Goodwill is, imo, largely a phony charity and a racket. I know some people have problems with Salvation Army, but they are who they say they are, and most cities of any size will have plenty of independent thrift shops to donate clothing to.

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Re: Dream of Konmarification - Getting rid of stuff thread

Post by Warren »

D.A. Ridgely wrote:
19 Oct 2019, 12:43
Hugh Akston wrote:
19 Oct 2019, 12:34
You can always drop them off at your local Goodwill/Salvation Army drop point. There are also resale shops that specialize in babby stuff. Not sure whether and how much they pay.
They'll pay zero. And Goodwill is, imo, largely a phony charity and a racket. I know some people have problems with Salvation Army, but they are who they say they are, and most cities of any size will have plenty of independent thrift shops to donate clothing to.
Huh. Our Goodwill drop off is right around back of the thrift store. During business hours, the sorting hat room is open and someone will usually assist you if you got big stuff or want to know if they want your stuff.

Is second hand consignment not a thing anymore?
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Re: Dream of Konmarification - Getting rid of stuff thread

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Consignment is bigger than ever actually.
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Re: Dream of Konmarification - Getting rid of stuff thread

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I've dipped into JasonL's toolbox and hired a friend's teen to come over this afternoon and help me haul shit out of my basement because the thought of making multiple trips up and down the stairs makes me weep. (Yes, long term I should just get the hell in shape, but as Madeline Westen once said, "One mountain a day, Michael."

The immediate problem is trying to clear enough room for him to get in and out, and at least vaguely sort the trash that needs to go in the dumpster from the boxes that need to go to our storage unit. It's like a dusty, 3D 15 puzzle, except I'd swear this one has 16 or even 17 pieces.
15grid1.jpg
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The next problem will be finding a way to distract David when the kid is hauling stuff out, because there are a lot of things (like old toys, cords, chairs, an artificial Christmas tree) that we never use but are "still good" so he'd feel immense anxiety watching them be thrown away. (Fear not, I know him well enough to know that if they disappear without his awareness, he'll never miss them or be bothered by them. He has plenty of books and personal shit down here that I'm keeping for his sake.)
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Re: Dream of Konmarification - Getting rid of stuff thread

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Ugh. I knew we had a mouse in the basement maybe four months ago (caught with a humane trap and released elsewhere) so I shouldn't be surprised to find evidence, but every time I pick up a box and find mouse poop or a book chewed to make a nest I get newly grossed out and annoyed.
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Re: Dream of Konmarification - Getting rid of stuff thread

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Ellie wrote:
18 May 2020, 12:55
caught with a humane trap and released elsewhere
My contempt for this is difficult to express. Mice are vermin. ALWAYS KILL whenever possible. Releasing them elsewhere is a total dick move infesting your neighbors.
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Re: Dream of Konmarification - Getting rid of stuff thread

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Warren wrote:
18 May 2020, 15:45
Ellie wrote:
18 May 2020, 12:55
caught with a humane trap and released elsewhere
My contempt for this is difficult to express. Mice are vermin. ALWAYS KILL whenever possible. Releasing them elsewhere is a total dick move infesting your neighbors.
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Re: Dream of Konmarification - Getting rid of stuff thread

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We had not-infrequent mice problems in NoVa -- no mice actually nesting/living in our place, but there were definitely gaps and cracks that are tiny by human standards, but big enough that outdoor mice would sometimes stumble in and be unable to find their way out. Jeff also heard/read that this was an especial problem in NoVa at the time because there was LOTS of "building new homes or businesses, on land which previously held no human structures, so lots of field mice and similar critters end up being displaced."

We used poisons or kill-traps exclusively; IIRC when I'd initially looked up the possibility of humane catch-and-release traps, it said that, in order to make sure the mice doesn't run right back into your house or some other human dwelling, you should only set it loose someplace at least two MILES from the nearest human development. Which was far too difficult and time-consuming to even attempt, in that region.
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Re: Dream of Konmarification - Getting rid of stuff thread

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It wasn't out of any concern for the mouse. I'm just too grossed out and anxious at the idea of having to handle a murdered animal -- or, much worse, what if it's injured but still alive and flopping around or something? I'm feeling a little panicky just typing that. Sorry for anyone whose house the mouse moved into next, if it didn't get chomped by a feral neighborhood cat first, but I can only do so much.
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Jennifer
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Re: Dream of Konmarification - Getting rid of stuff thread

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Ellie wrote:
18 May 2020, 17:21
It wasn't out of any concern for the mouse. I'm just too grossed out and anxious at the idea of having to handle a murdered animal -- or, much worse, what if it's injured but still alive and flopping around or something?
Based on my experiences with mice problems -- especially the time our traps and poisons netted us three dead mice in only two days -- the plastic-box snap traps we used caught and killed mice but kept their bodies inside out of sight; tossing such a box is not "handling a dead animal" so much as "handling a small plastic box which, at most, has a bit of tail sticking out the back." But IIRC, those were pretty expensive -- single-use traps, and five years ago they cost us something like four bucks per disposed-of mouse, which is doable if it's just "a couple of outdoor mice who wandered in," but way too expensive for handling "actual mouse infestation." (We had far more luck with the poison-bait traps, and sweeping that desiccated dead mouse into the dustpan did not give me the "squick" effects of instead dealing with a live injured one, or a dead one with visible gore, or anything like that. But poison would be a bad idea for you because of your kids; when I complained here about the mouse problem a few years ago, I ended my first post on the matter with "Serious advice to Gryllparents with super-young'uns: if ever you have a mouse problem, stick with the plastic snap-traps rather than the poison bait, because a poisoned mouse in the middle of the floor looks EXACTLY like something a small child would mistake for a cute little toy.")

ETA: And a bit later I said this: "...the plastic-box traps are expensive ($4 each, single-use) and the old-fashioned wooden-bar traps make a bloody mess (Jeff's mom used them when he was a kid). So traps are fine if you only have one or two mice to dispose of -- say, after an outdoor critter ran inside your house -- but if you have an actual infestation, as I fear we might have, you kind of have to stick with poison, unless you're willing and able to either spend a lot of money, or deal with a literal bloody mess to clean up. Our apartment in central Connecticut was over a century old and in a distinctly slummy neighborhood -- but we never had vermin problems like we've had here."
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